Space Vampire

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyBuck and Wilma visit Theta Station to have repairs made to Twiki. Mere minutes behind them, a derelict freighter emerges through the stargate and collides with Theta Station, after the station’s crew fails to make contact with anyone who might be on board. The crew of the freighter is found dead inside, and with no cause readily apparent, Station Commander Royko declares a quarantine. After further examination, Dr. Ecbar discovers that the “corpses” are not dead – but not long after he reveals this to Buck, the doctor dies mysteriously, his neck discolored in the same inexplicable fashion as the other victims. Wilma repeatedly experiences strange sensations, and even begins to see a chilling alien humanoid appear. Royko insists in believing that havoc is being wreaked by a hallucinatory virus, but after narrowly surviving a violent encounter with the same being that Wilma has been seeing, Buck thinks that a soul-stealing creature – the 25th century equivalent of a vampire – is responsible for the mounting body count.

Order the DVDswritten by Kathleen Barnes and David Wise
directed by Larry Stewart
music by Stu Phillips

Buck RogersGuest Cast: Christopher Stone (Commander Royko), Nicholas Hormann (The Vorvon), Lincoln Kilpatrick (Dr. Ecbar), Phil Hoover (Helson), Patti Maloney (Twiki), David Moses (Technician), Jeanne Fitzsimmons (Freighter Captain)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Broken Image

The Incredible HulkUnder the assumed name “David Bowman”, Banner takes up residence in an inner-city apartment, also taking a job there as the apartment’s janitor. But another resident there, a man named Mike Cassidy, bears a striking resemblence to Banner, and as Cassidy is already a con man, he sees an opportunity to use Banner as a decoy to throw off a group of men trying to recover thousands of dollars from him. When Banner is drawn into this sordid scheme and beaten up, the Hulk naturally emerges, complicating Cassidy’s plan (and Banner’s life). Worse yet, Jack McGee follows the latest reports of the Hulk’s appearance right to Banner’s apartment door.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Karen Harris & Jill Sherman
directed by John McPherson
music by Joe Harnell

Cast: Bill Bixby (David Bruce Banner), Jack Colvin (Jack McGee), Lou Ferrigno (The Hulk), Karen Carlson (Lorraine), John Reilly (Steve), Jed Mills (Teddy), Chris Wallace (Danny), Erica Yohn (Woman with dog), George Caldwell (Pete), Enrique Castillo (Larry), Donald W. Carter (Police Lieutenant), Al White (Police Sergeant), Sally Sommer (Miriam)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Ming’s Last Battle

Flash GordonFrozen by Ming himself, Flash is in no position to stop Ming from abducting Dale and Princess Aura to take them back to Mongo, where he plans to force Dale to marry him – or she will have to watch Flash die. Among Flash’s allies, preparations are underway to launch a final counterattack against Ming, especially since Vultan has been restored to power. Though Dr. Zarkov, Prince Barrin and Thun are worried about the lack of contact from Flash, their plans must proceed on schedule, and the Hawkmen’s mobile Sky City proceeds toward Mongo’s capitol city. Ming’s forces mount an overwhelming defense, forcing Sky City to retreat; Ming orders his robot fighters to pursue the city before repairs can be conducted. Vultan’s Hawkmen take to the sky to fight off the attack, while Aura sets Flash free. As the Queen of Frigia joins the fight and turns the tide for Sky City’s survival, Flash crashes the wedding and challenges Ming to a duel.

Flash GordonDownload this episode via Amazonwritten by Ted Pedersen
directed by Gwen Wetzler
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael
Flash Gordon theme by Marc Ellis & Jeff Michael

Cast: Bob Ridgely (Flash Gordon / Prince Barin), Alan Oppenheimer (Ming / Dr. Hans Zarkov / Captain Erzine), Diane Pershing (Dale Arden / Queen Undina), Allan Melvin (Thun / King Vultan), Melendy Britt (Princess Aura / Queen Fria), Lou Scheimer (Narrator)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Horns Of Nimon – Part 3

Doctor WhoWhile Seth and Teka worry about finding an exit from the maze, the Doctor and Romana are more interested in finding what is at the center of the maze, and at the heart of the Nimon’s operation. What they find there is a room full of equipment for diverting immense amounts of power to a matter transmitter. He and his friends then have to hide as the Nimon itself approaches, operating the equipment now that it has the tribute from Aneth to bring his complex up to full power. A pod appears in the transmat chamber, carrying two more Nimon, with more to come. The tributes of slaves and material from Skonnos are merely helping the Nimon’s own invasion plans, which will not benefit Skonnos in any way. Once the Nimon have left, Romana sits in the transmat pod to analyze it, and is accidentally sent to Crinoth, the Nimon’s home world.

Order this story on DVDDownload this episodewritten by Anthony Read
directed by Kenny McBain
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Tom Baker (The Doctor), Lalla Ward (Romana), David Brierly (voice of K9), Simon Gipps-Kent (Seth), Janet Ellis (Teka), Graham Crowden (Soldeed), Michael Osborne (Sorak), Malcolm Terris (Co-pilot), Bob Hornery (Pilot), Clifford Norgate (Nimon voices), John Bailey (Sezom), Robin Sherringham, Bob Appleby, Trevor St. John Hacker (Nimon)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Aftermath

Blake's 7The Liberator is damaged heavily in the ensuing war and starts away from the main battles. The life support system begins to fail and the crew must abandon ship. Avon is knocked out when debris from a hit near the life capsule launch area collapses on him, and Cally and Vila get him into a capsule. Landing on the planet Serran, Avon is saved from vicious natives by a young woman called Dayna, who takes him to her father’s underwater home base. On the way there, they encounter Servalan, who has deposed the High Council, declared herself President, and has topped all this by getting herself marooned. Servalan attempts to seduce Avon, but he resists and uses Orac to signal the Liberator. In an attempt to steal Orac and slip away, Servalan is stopped by Dayna’s blind father, who is killed by Servalan. Dayna vows vengeance and she and Avon set out to find Servalan. After “rescuing” Servalan from the restless natives, Avon recovers Orac, and with Dayna he returns to the Liberator when it arrives, while Servalan hides away in the undersea installation. On returning to the ship, Avon and Dayna find a full squad of Federation shock troops in control…

written by Terry Nation
directed by Vere Lorrimer
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jacqueline Pearce (Servalan), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), Josette Simon (Dayna), Cy Grant (Mellanby), Alan Lake (Chel), Sally Harrison (Lauren), Richard Franklin (Trooper), Michael Melia (Trooper), Steven Pacey (Tarrant)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Happy Birthday, Buck

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyCabin fever starts to set in as Buck tires of the sterile surroundings of the New Chicago base – and Dr. Huer and Wilma realize that Buck is nearing his birthday. As they begin to plan a surprise party for the oldest man on Earth, Lt. Garth from the New Detroit complex arrives with an urgent message: someone is hunting Huer, someone who can transform the cells in a living being’s body into lifeless silicone by touch. In order to get Buck out of the way so preparations can be made for his surprise party, Huer arranges for Buck to escort an intelligence agent to New Detroit – which puts Buck in a position to intercept Huer’s stalker…or die trying.

Order the DVDswritten by Martin Pasko
directed by Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
music by J.J. Johnson

Guest Cast: Peter MacLean (Traeger), Tamara Dobson (Dr. Delora Bayliss), Morgan Brittany (Raylyn Derren), Chip Johnson (Carew), Bruce Wright (Rorvik), Tom Gagen (Niles), Clay Alexander (Marsden), Eric Mason (Lt. Garth), Abe Alvarez (Security agent), Harry Gold (Alien squadron leader), Victoria Woodbeck (Technician), Gina Gallego (Woman)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Horns Of Nimon – Part 4

Doctor WhoRomana emerges from the transmat pod on the planet Crinoth, and is immediately surrounded by more Nimon…until she finds that she’s not the only one on Crinoth who isn’t a Nimon. Sezom, Soldeed’s predecessor, has been trapped here, and has spent years evading the Nimon on their home planet – a ruined husk of a world that they now seek to escape by invading another world. Sezom helps her get back to the pod and return to Skonnos. Soldeed has now learned that the Nimon lied when it claimed to be the last of its race, but in the course of trying to do the Nimon’s bidding, accidentally sets the Nimon’s power systems to overload. The Doctor and friends must now rely on K-9 to help them find their way out of the maze before the Nimon complex destroys itself.

Order this story on DVDDownload this episodewritten by Anthony Read
directed by Kenny McBain
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Tom Baker (The Doctor), Lalla Ward (Romana), David Brierly (voice of K9), Simon Gipps-Kent (Seth), Janet Ellis (Teka), Graham Crowden (Soldeed), Michael Osborne (Sorak), Malcolm Terris (Co-pilot), Bob Hornery (Pilot), Clifford Norgate (Nimon voices), John Bailey (Sezom), Robin Sherringham, Bob Appleby, Trevor St. John Hacker (Nimon)

Notes: The Nimon return to do battle with the Doctor in the Big Finish audio story Seasons Of Fear. The eleventh Doctor would encounter a species related to the Nimon in The God Complex (2011). Though intended to be followed by the six-part story Shada, The Horns Of Nimon was the final season 17 episode to be broadcast, and therefore marks the end of producer Graham Williams’ tenure, as well as being the final use in the original series of Delia Derbyshire’s arrangement of the theme music, which had been opening each episode of Doctor Who since 1963, sometimes in edited and lightly remixed forms. (It would next be heard at the beginning of The Day Of The Doctor (2013). This is also composer Dudley Simpson’s final musical contribution to the series for which he had been creating music since 1964’s Planet Of Giants.

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green […]

Powerplay

Blake's 7Avon and Dayna are interrogated by the Federation officers, who are under the command of Del Tarrant. Avon, using the pseudonym Chevron, fakes an attempt to draw a concealed weapon and is knocked out by Tarrant. Dayna attacks with the same end result, and both are locked into a cabin. As soon as they manage to get out again, Avon contacts Zen and learns that the ship is en route to pick up Vila, who has been marooned on a jungle planet where a primitive faction and a race of advanced humans fight each other for any new arrivals on the planet. After that, Avon and Dayna discover that someone is killing off the Federation troops one by one. Avon sets out to learn who, while Dayna stays behind armed but is captured. Avon discovers that Tarrant is not a Federation Captain, but an outlaw who had been wanting to join Blake and his crew and had to disguise himself as a Federation officer. He and Tarrant overpower the other Federation troops and rescue Dayna, as Vila and Cally, who has also arrived on that planet, are about to be killed.

written by Terry Nation
directed by David Maloney
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Jacqueline Pearce (Servalan), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen), Michael Sheard (Clegg), Doyne Byrd (Harmon), John Hollis (Lom), Michael Crane (Mall), Primi Townsend (Zee), Julia Vidler (Barr), Catherine Chase (Nurse), Helen Blatch (Receptionist)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Expeditions

The Martian ChroniclesJuly 1976: Viking 1, an unmanned space probe, lands on Mars and transmits the first pictures of its surface back to Earth. No life is found, confounding centuries of speculation about canals and the aliens who might have constructed them.

January 1999: The first manned mission to Mars lifts off from Cape Canaveral, carrying a team of three astronauts to Mars. Unknown to them, their arrival has been anticipated by an advanced race of Martians whose presence went undetected by the Viking probes. When the astronauts from Earth land, a xenophobic Martian kills them before they even have a chance to walk on Martian soil.

April 2000: A second manned mission is launched to Mars, and its three-man crew is stunned when the Martian dust clears to reveal a very Earthlike environment. But it’s not the true Martian civilization exposed at last; instead, it’s an illusion tailor-made to emulate memories plucked out of the Earthmen’s minds. At first the astronauts are taken in by the illusion, but when they begin to question it and try to escape it, the Martians show their true form and intent, allowing the astronauts to die without getting a message off to Earth about life on Mars.

June 2001: Despite the tragedy, a more extensive follow-up mission is launched, with a larger crew commanded by Colonel John Wilder, who has overseen the previous missions from Earth. Almost immediately upon landing, evidence of a Martian civilization, seemingly abandoned, is found. There’s no longer any denying the presence of life there, though the monuments seem to be abandoned, perhaps evidence of an extinct civilization. Major Jeff Spender, Wilder’s right-hand man on Earth and hand-picked to join him on this mission, ventures off into the Martian ruins himself and comes back a changed man. But changed into what?

teleplay by Richard Matheson
based on the novel by Ray Bradbury
directed by Michael Anderson
music by Stanley Myers / electronic music by Richard Harvey

Cast: Rock Hudson (Colonel John Wilder), Gayle Hunnicutt (Ruth Wilder), Bernie Casey (Maj. Jeff Spender), Christopher Connelly (Ben Driscoll), Nicholas Hammond (Arthur Black), Roddy McDowall (Father Stone), Darren McGavin (Sam Parkhill), Bernadette Peters (Genevieve Seltzer), Maria Schell (Anna Lustig), Joyce Van Patten (Elma Parkhill), Fritz Weaver (Father Peregrine), Linda Lou Allen (Marilyn Becker), Michael Anderson Jr. (David Lustig), Robert Beatty (General Halstead), James Faulkner (Mr. K), John Finch (Christ), Terence Longdon (Wise Martian), Barry Morse (Peter Hathaway), Nyree Dawn Porter (Alice Hathaway), Wolfgang Reichmann (Lafe Lustig), Maggie Wright (Ylla), John Cassady (Briggs), Alison Elliott (Lavinia Spaulding), Vadim Glowna (Sam Hinston), Richard Heffer (Capt. Conover), Derek Lamden (Sandship Martian), Peter Marinker (McClure), Richard Oldfield (Capt. York), Anthony Pullen-Shaw (Edward Black), Burnell Tucker (Bill Wilder)

The Martian ChroniclesNotes: A lavish co-production between NBC and the BBC, shot on “otherworldly” Lanzarote (a volcanic island where the BBC would also later shoot the 1984 Doctor Who story Planet Of Fire), The Martian Chronicles was intended to be the major draw to NBC’s fall 1979 season. But Ray Bradbury himself, the author of the original stories the miniseries was based on, torpedoed that launch by calling the TV adaptation out as “boring” in a publicity appearance. With the creator of its major premiere alerting the public to a stinker, NBC rescheduled the miniseries to run during the winter doldrums of January 1980, before the ratings sweeps month of February (for which NBC already had a dire forecast, since the 1980 Winter Olympics would be airing during February on rival network ABC, likely trouncing anything scheduled against the games by NBC or CBS). The BBC didn’t air The Martian Chronicles until August 1980.

The show’s decks are stacked with genre veterans, including Roddy McDowall (Planet Of The Apes), Maria Schell and Barry Morse (Space: 1999), and Darren McGavin (Kolchak: The Night Stalker). Robert Beatty had appeared in pivotal episodes of Doctor Who (The Tenth Planet) and Blake’s 7 (The Way Back). Bernie Casey would appear in both Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Babylon 5 during the 1990s. (Tangentially, Rock Hudson had starred in 1971’s creepy non-genre movie Pretty Maids All In A Row, written and produced by one Gene Roddenberry.) Director Michael Anderson also had a well-known genre credit under his belt, the 1976 SF cult classic Logan’s Run, while one of composer Stanley Myers’ earliest TV music credits was for the 1964 Doctor Who story Marco Polo.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

A Blast For Buck

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyA mysterious object is transported directly into Doctor Huer’s office, putting the entire Earth Defense Directorate complex on alert and defying any attempts to scan its contents. When Buck touches the object, it transmits a vague but menacing riddle into Huer’s computer. Buck, Wilma and even Twiki take turns under Huer’s mind probe, trying to figure out who would have the resources to pull off such an elaborate scheme, and why such an entity wouldn’t simply attack Earth rather than sending a puzzle.

Order the DVDsteleplay by Richard Nelson
story by John Gaynor
directed by David Phinney
music by Stu Phillips

Guest Cast: Patty Maloney (Twiki), Gary Coleman (Hieronymous Fox)

Appearing in footage from earlier episodes: Jack Palance (Kaleel), Peter Graves (Noah Cooper), Frank Gorshin (Kellogg), Pamela Hensley (Princess Ardala), Ray Walston (Roderick Zale), Buster Crabbe (Brigadier Gordon), Brianne Leary (Ryma), Pamela Susan Shoop (Tangie), Jamie Lee Curtis (Jen Burton)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Volcano

Blake's 7Dayna and Tarrant’s first assignment as Liberator crew members is to visit the planet Obsidian and investigate two things: rumors that Blake had fled to that planet after evacuating the Liberator, and the possibility of using Obsidian as a base from which to fight the Federation. But Servalan and her troops arrive to take over the world, and the people of Obsidian reveal the weapon which has kept them safe from the Federation all this time.

written by Allan Prior
directed by Desmond McCarthy
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Jacqueline Pearce (Servalan), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), Michael Gough (Hower), Malcolm Bullivant (Bershar), Ben Howard (Mori), Alan Bowerman (Battle Fleet Commander), Russell Denton (Milus), Judy Matheson (Mutoid)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Episode 8 (Fit The Eighth)

Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy: Secondary PhaseZaphod Beeblebrox isn’t in big trouble. He left big trouble behind long ago and is now in galaxy-sized trouble – he has been taken to the Frogstar, the most evil world in all the galaxy, where he has a date with the Total Perspective Vortex…a usually fatal sentence. No less fatal is the predicment in which Ford and Arthur have found themselves. Ford’s attempt to flag down a passing spaceship to hitch a ride has instead resulted in the ship crashing and causing a volcanic eruption, leaving the two hitchhikers trapped in a cave with no escape. Rather inexplicably, Zaphod rescues them in the Heart of Gold, having survived his encounter with the Total Perspective Vortex.

Order this CDwritten by Douglas Adams
directed by Alick Hale-Munro
music by Paddy Kingsland

Cast: Peter Jones (The Voice of the Book), Simon Jones (Arthur Dent), Geoffrey McGivern (Ford Prefect), Mark Wing-Davey (Zaphod Beeblebrox), Alan Ford (Roosta), David Tate (Eddie / Frogstar Prison Relations Officer), Valentine Dyall (Gargravarr)

The Settlers

The Martian ChroniclesFebruary 2004: Even with the high cost in lives of the third manned mission to Mars, full-scale colonization of the red planet begins. Mankind is still unaware of the ongoing Martian presence. Mining begins on Mars, supporting the construction of buildings and roads. The invasion from Earth has begun.

The Martians stay hidden, observing and plotting, and occasionally trying to walk among the humans in disguise. One such disguise – the dead son of a couple who have moved to Mars – gives the secret away. A pair of monks nearly die in an avalanche, only to be saved by Martian intervention, though one of the monks is certain that it’s a sign of God, not a sign of alien life, and nearly goes mad trying to prove it. At a greasy spoon cafe established by one of Wilder’s former landing party members, a Martian appears in full ceremonial robes, only to be shot at point blank range. Another appear, seemingly surrendering any claim on nearly half of Mars. What no one on Mars realizes is that the red planet is soon to become humanity’s permanent home.

teleplay by Richard Matheson
based on the novel by Ray Bradbury
directed by Michael Anderson
music by Stanley Myers / electronic music by Richard Harvey

Cast: Rock Hudson (Colonel John Wilder), Gayle Hunnicutt (Ruth Wilder), Bernie Casey (Maj. Jeff Spender), Christopher Connelly (Ben Driscoll), Nicholas Hammond (Arthur Black), Roddy McDowall (Father Stone), Darren McGavin (Sam Parkhill), Bernadette Peters (Genevieve Seltzer), Maria Schell (Anna Lustig), Joyce Van Patten (Elma Parkhill), Fritz Weaver (Father Peregrine), Linda Lou Allen (Marilyn Becker), Michael Anderson Jr. (David Lustig), Robert Beatty (General Halstead), James Faulkner (Mr. K), John Finch (Christ), Terence Longdon (Wise Martian), Barry Morse (Peter Hathaway), The Martian ChroniclesNyree Dawn Porter (Alice Hathaway), Wolfgang Reichmann (Lafe Lustig), Maggie Wright (Ylla), John Cassady (Briggs), Alison Elliott (Lavinia Spaulding), Vadim Glowna (Sam Hinston), Richard Heffer (Capt. Conover), Derek Lamden (Sandship Martian), Peter Marinker (McClure), Richard Oldfield (Capt. York), Anthony Pullen-Shaw (Edward Black), Burnell Tucker (Bill Wilder)

Notes: Michael Anderson Jr. is the son of director Michael Anderson; he also appeared in Land Of The Giants, Psi Factor and an episode of the Highlander series.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Episode 9 (Fit The Ninth)

Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy: Secondary PhaseThough Zaphod has managed to escape the Total Perspective Vortex – at the cost, perhaps, of a bit of what’s left of his sanity – the Heart of Gold crew’s problems are only beginning. Ford notices that a Vogon fleet has been following the ship for some time now, but takes his time to notify Arthur or Zaphod of this fact. Though the Vogons are packing enough firepower to finish them off, they seem to be holding back for some reason. This is just as well, because Arthur as inadvertently set the Heart of Gold’s entire computer system onto the problem of why he should ask for real tea instead of synthesized tea, leaving the rest of the ship incapable of offering any kind of tactical or defensive help. When the Vogons do attack, however, Zaphod seeks help from the other side.

Order this CDwritten by Douglas Adams
directed by Alick Hale-Munro
music by Paddy Kingsland

Cast: Peter Jones (The Voice of the Book), Simon Jones (Arthur Dent), Geoffrey McGivern (Ford Prefect / Ventilation system), Mark Wing-Davey (Zaphod Beeblebrox), Stephen Moore (Marvin / Gag Halfrunt / Vogon guard), David Tate (Eddie / Vogon guard #2 / Vogon computer), Bill Wallis (Vogon Captain), Leueen Willoughby (Nutrimat machine), Richard Goolden (Zaphod Beeblebrox IV)

Episode 10 (Fit The Tenth)

Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy: Secondary PhaseThe Heart of Gold escapes the Vogons by using the Infinite Improbability Drive, materializing in what looks like a cave on the planet Brontitall. Technically, though, it’s not on the planet – it’s 13 miles above the planet, as Arthur discovers when he falls out of the opening. Luckily for him, he lands on the back of a large and apparently sentient bird, who informs him that he’s actually just fallen out of a statue. When Arthur sees the statue in full, he’s aghast to see it’s a representation of himself, throwing a cup of badly made synthetic tea from the Heart of Gold’s nutrimat. Every oriface of the anatomically correct statue has become home to this race of intelligent birds. Much to his alarm, Arthur finds that he may have changed the very course of evolution on Brontitall, and he also finds that an archaeologist named Lintilla is currently attempting to work out quite how he did it.

Order this CDwritten by Douglas Adams
directed by Alick Hale-Munro
music by Paddy Kingsland

Cast: Peter Jones (The Voice of the Book), Simon Jones (Arthur Dent), Geoffrey McGivern (Ford Prefect), Mark Wing-Davey (Zaphod Beeblebrox), Stephen Moore (Marvin), David Tate (Eddie), Ronald Baddiley (Bird One), John Baddeley (Bird Two / Foot Warrior), Rula Lenska (Lintilla), John Le Mesurier (Wise Old Bird)

Notes: It may surprise Hitchhiker’s fans to learn that it wasn’t until this episode of the radio series that the now-legendary tirade on uses for the towel was introduced to the Hitchhiker mythos, along with the words “hoopy” and “frood.”

Ardala Returns

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyOn a deep space patrol with Twiki, Buck is captured by the Draconian flagship. Princess Ardala and Kane have hatched a plan to replace Buck with a robot copy programmed to emulate Buck’s personality. The copy is armed with a bomb and sent back to Earth in a “stolen” Draconian fighter; when Wilma encounters the robot Buck, he tells her that he escaped in the Draconian fighter but Twiki didn’t make it. When the robot returns to Earth, it tries to detonate the bomb the first time it’s in the same room with Wilma, Dr. Huer and Dr. Theopolis – and only Wilma’s quick reflex to destroy the robot saves the day. In the meantime, aware that their plan has failed, Ardala and Kane set about trying to make a more accurate, undetectable copy of Buck. And Buck is unaware that his every cunning escape attempt is being studied to make his robot clones deadlier in a fight. Can Buck taint his robotic replicas by dulling his survival instincts?

Order the DVDswritten by Chris Bunch & Allan Cole
directed by Larry Stewart
music by Johnny Harris

Guest Cast: Pamela Hensley (Princess Ardala), Michael Ansara (Kane), H.B. Haggerty (Tigerman), James Emery (Pilot), Betty Bridges (Technician), Bob Minor (Guard)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Episode 11 (Fit The Eleventh)

Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy: Secondary PhaseMomentous events are afoot on Brontitall as Arthur and Lintilla (and a couple of her five billion or so clones) discover a layer of ancient shoes beneath the planet’s surface. This proves Lintilla’s theory that Brontitall may have once been a shoe-based economy, eschewing every other sector of commerce in favor of the production, marketing and sale of footwear. Meanwhile, Ford and Arthur have rather haphazardly made their way to the planet’s surface via bird, where they find a graveyard of spacecraft – including one which still seems to be in good working condition.

Order this CDwritten by Douglas Adams
directed by Alick Hale-Munro
music by Paddy Kingsland

Cast: Peter Jones (The Voice of the Book), Simon Jones (Arthur Dent), Geoffrey McGivern (Ford Prefect), Mark Wing-Davey (Zaphod Beeblebrox), Stephen Moore (Marvin / Pupil), David Tate (Eddie / Compu-Teach / Commentator), John Baddeley (Bird Two / Foot Warrior), Rula Lenska (Lintilla), Mark Smith (Hig Hurtenflurst)

Episode 12 (Fit The Twelfth)

Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy: Secondary PhaseArthur, Lintilla, Marvin, Lintilla and Lintilla are trapped, pinned down by Brontitall Foot Warriors, but they get an unexpected bit of help from a number of clones all named Allitnil, all of whom are quite taken with Lintilla. Meanwhile, Ford and Zaphod make their way into the still-viable derelict, discovering that the crew is in suspended animation – at least until they awaken. But they’re suddenly removed from Brontitall by Zarniwoop, the man about whom Zaphod left himself a message. Together with Arthur, they meet the man who’s supposedly running the universe. And when he reveals that it was, in fact, Zaphod who ordered the demolition of the Earth, no one expects Arthur Dent to do what he does next.

Order this CDCast: Peter Jones (The Voice of the Book), Simon Jones (Arthur Dent), Geoffrey McGivern (Ford Prefect / Priest), Mark Wing-Davey (Zaphod Beeblebrox), Stephen Moore (Marvin / The Man in the Shack), David Tate (Eddie / Allitnils), Rula Lenska (Lintilla / Stewardess), Ken Campbell (Poodoo), Jonthan Pryce (Zarniwoop / Autopilot)

Galactica Discovers Earth

Battlestar Galactica (original)The beleaguered Battlestar arrives at Earth, a full generation after having received the planet’s location. But there are two problems: the Cylons are still in pursuit of Galactica, and somewhat to the crew’s surprise, Earth (in the year 1980 A.D., by its time scale) isn’t even remotely capable of withstanding a Cylon attack. Adama’s grandson Troy (who spent his childhood with the nickname “Boxey”) and Lt. Dillon remain on Earth as their ship departs Earth once more in an attempt to divert the Cylons from the defenseless human race. A plan emerges to give the human race a higher order of technology to defend Earth from the Cylon onslaught, but there is disagreement over how much technology should be given to a race which is just as likely to destroy itself. And one member of the Council of Twelve decides to take matters into his own hands, traveling back in time to arm the people of Earth with advanced weaponry…but he may be handing dangerously sophisticated technology to precisely the wrong players in Earth’s history.

Season 2 Regular Cast: Lorne Greene (Commander Adama), Kent McCord (Captain Troy), Barry Van Dyke (Lt. Dillon), Robyn Douglass (Jamie Hamilton), Patrick Stuart (Dr. Zee), Herbert Jefferson Jr. (Colonel Boomer), Fred Holliday (Brooks)

Order the DVDsDownload this episodewritten by Glen A. Larson
directed by Sidney Hayers

Guest Cast: Robbie Rist (Dr. Zee), Richard Lynch (Xavier), Robert Reed (Professor Mortinson), Christopher Stone (Major Stockwell), Sharon Acker (Secretary), Richard Eastham (General Cushing), Albert Paulsen (?), Louis Turenne (?), Michael Strong (?), Pamela Susan Shoop (Ms. Carlyle), Vernon Weddle (First cop), David Moses (Second cop), Brion James (Willy), Mickey Jones (Donzo), Duncan Mackenzie (First pilot), Bruce Douglas (Second pilot), Eddie Firestone (Derelict), Frank Downing (First guard), Don Maxwell (Second guard), Ted Gehring (Sheriff), Curt Lowens (German commander), James R. Parkes (Walt Griffin), Bruce Wright (Aide), Adam Starr (Willy Griffin), Missy Francis (Little girl), Todd Martin (Third German), John Zenda (Cop), Erik Holland (Second German officer), Eric Forst (First German officer), Hank Brandt (Colonel), Duncan Mackenzie (Third guard), Jonathan Williams (Second guard), Paul Brown (Fourth guard), Ray Duke (Newspaper boy), Doug Hale (Air Force Major), Billy Jacoby (Tucker)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Dawn Of The Gods

Blake's 7Orac, curious about an unusual black hole, takes control of the Liberator and swings her too close. The ship is swallowed up by the black hole, and it is discovered that this particular black hole is indeed unusual because it is artificial constructed by an outcast “god” from Cally’s home planet of Auron who seeks a powerful ship, brilliant slaves – and Cally.

written by James Follett
directed by Desmond McCarthy
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), Sam Dastor (The Caliph), Terry Scully (Groff), Marcus Powell (The Thaarn)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Martians

The Martian ChroniclesNovember 2006: Colonel Wilder flies a solo return mission to Earth, hoping to find survivors or some remnants of civilization, but nuclear war has wiped out the birthplace of the human race. The only surviving humans now live on Mars, and no further supply missions from Earth are coming. Wracked with guilt, Wilder returns to Mars.

As the human settlers eke out a meager existence trying to live off the Martian land, though some are seemingly oblivious to Earth’s fate. Wilder lands near the home of a brilliant scientist who, in despair, has turned his talents toward recreating his dead family members with robots. Returning to the Martian ruins that drove Spender mad, Wilder encounters a Martian – or perhaps a recorded message from one – who urges him to make peace with the destruction of Earth and accept that people from Earth are the new Martians.

teleplay by Richard Matheson
based on the novel by Ray Bradbury
directed by Michael Anderson
music by Stanley Myers / electronic music by Richard Harvey

Cast: Rock Hudson (Colonel John Wilder), Gayle Hunnicutt (Ruth Wilder), Bernie Casey (Maj. Jeff Spender), Christopher Connelly (Ben Driscoll), Nicholas Hammond (Arthur Black), Roddy McDowall (Father Stone), Darren McGavin (Sam Parkhill), Bernadette Peters (Genevieve Seltzer), Maria Schell (Anna Lustig), Joyce Van Patten (Elma Parkhill), Fritz Weaver (Father Peregrine), Linda Lou Allen (Marilyn Becker), Michael Anderson Jr. (David Lustig), Robert Beatty (General Halstead), James Faulkner (Mr. K), John Finch (Christ), Terence Longdon (Wise Martian), Barry Morse (Peter Hathaway), Nyree Dawn Porter (Alice Hathaway), Wolfgang Reichmann (Lafe Lustig), Maggie Wright (Ylla), John Cassady (Briggs), Alison Elliott (Lavinia Spaulding), Vadim Glowna (Sam Hinston), Richard Heffer (Capt. Conover), The Martian ChroncilesDerek Lamden (Sandship Martian), Peter Marinker (McClure), Richard Oldfield (Capt. York), Anthony Pullen-Shaw (Edward Black), Burnell Tucker (Bill Wilder)

Notes: Producer Milton Subotsky was one of the founders of ’60s British horror powerhouse Amicus Films, which also released the two ’60s big-screen adaptations of Doctor Who starring Peter Cushing. (Since the Amicus name was associated so closely with horror films, a fictitious production company called AARU Films was credited for the Doctor Who films.) Amicus also released the first filmed adaptation of the Tales From The Crypt comics, predating the HBO series by 17 years.

Twiki Is Missing

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyAn unusual asteroid composed of frozen oxygen is being escorted to Earth by a squadron of fighters under Wilma’s command. Though hardly a routine operation, the plan is to maneuver the asteroid through a precisely calculated window in Earth’s atmosphere shield to replenish the planet’s air. A slight miscalculation would cause it to miss the window – and the oxygen would heat up and ignite explosively, laying waste to Earth’s surface. On another asteroid, corrupt mining magnate Kurt Belzack is growing infuriated with his miners’ demands for adequate rest and humane treatment. When they send a union representative to negotiate, Belzack unleashes the powers of three lovely psychokinetic women to eliminate him. A spy on Earth relays information to Belzack about a robotic drone that could do the work of Belzack’s miners without pay, food, or rest. One possible drawback is that the drone has an unquestioning loyalty to one man – and neither Twiki nor his “owner” are likely to cooperate.

Order the DVDswritten by Jaron Summers
directed by Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
music by Herbert Woods

Guest Cast: Eddie Benton (Stella), John P. Ryan (Kurt Belzack), David Darlow (Pinchas), Janet Bebe Louie (Clare), Eugenia Wright (Dawn), Ken Letner (Oto Anad)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Harvest Of Kairos

Blake's 7Servalan’s new right-hand man and tactical advisor takes Tarrant on in a battle of strategy in space and on foot on the deadly planet of Kairos, but Avon’s obsessive search for an elusive new weapon hinders the Liberator crew’s efficiency – but saves them in the end.

written by Ben Steed
directed by Gerald Blake
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Jacqueline Pearce (Servalan), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), Andrew Burt (Jarvik), Frank Gatliff (Dastor), Anthony Gardner (Shad), Charles Jamieson (Guard), Sam Davies (Carlon), Christopher Douglas (First Leader, Third Leader), Hywel David (Interceptor Captain, Second Leader)

Notes: In a 1986 interview with Time Screen magazine, Paul Darrow said that this episode was “the one that made Jan Chappell decide to leave.”

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Olympiad

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyBuck is invited to fly an authentic 20th century Olympic flag at the 2492 Olympics on behalf of the Earth Defense Directorate, and takes Twiki and Dr. Theopolis along with him to the games. Buck finds that the Olympics have changed in 500 years, however – simple events have become mind-boggling, gravity-defying feats, and some of the off-world contestants have unusual customs, including one young man who refuses to speak to Buck and then appears to experience severe pain. A young woman competing in the astrosledding event gives Buck a taste of high-speed orbital racing, but also uses the isolation of her sled pod to plead for Buck’s help in freeing her and her boyfriend, the young man who demanded that Buck leave him alone, from the stranglehold their manager has on them. She officially requests asylum, and Buck gets approval from Dr. Huer before proceeding. But in doing so, he’s put himself in the crosshairs of a manager who intends to keep his athletes – or kill them before they can defect.

Order the DVDswritten by Craig Buck
directed by Larry Stewart
music by J.J. Johnson

Guest Cast: Nicolas Coster (Allerick), Judith Chapman (Lara Teasian), Barney McFadden (Jorex Leet), Paul Mantee (Karl), Elgin Baylor (Athlete), Anthony Davis (Athlete), Thomas “Hollywood” Henderson (Athlete), Carlos Palomino (Athlete), Jerry Quarry (Quarod), Bob Seagren (Rand Sorgon), Paul Coufos (Zogan), John Zee (Satrap)

Notes: This episode’s guest stars have years of professional football, basketball and boxing experience, including real-life Olympian Thomas Henderson, who was on the U.S. basketball team in the 1972 Olympics. Former boxing champ Carlos Palomino had a later brush with science fiction as well – he helped to train actor Robert Beltran for the Star Trek: Voyager episode The Fight, which involved Chakotay boxing with an alien.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The City At The Edge Of The World

Blake's 7Vila is bullied by Tarrant into assisting an unknown party on Keezarn, a remote planet, in exchange for some weapons crystals needed on the Liberator. The unknown party shortchanges Tarrant, sending a bomb instead, which is what Avon anticipated. As he and Cally teleport down to rescue Vila, the thief discovers that he is to be working for a criminal known as “Bayban the butcher” – a man with a reputation for mayhem “second only to Blake” (a comment to which Bayban himself reacts badly). Bayban wants Vila to break into an impossible door, which is what Vila does, taking Bayban’s attractive gunhand with him. They discover an infinite-range teleport system that sends them to the planet the real people of Keezarn are destined to reach and there Vila discovers the type of crystals Tarrant needed. On returning to Keezarn, they find that Avon and the others have captured Bayban’s forces. Vila has a chance to go off with Kerril or return to the Liberator – and then Bayban himself prepares to destroy the city.

written by Chris Boucher
directed by Vere Lorrimer
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), Colin Baker (Bayban), Carol Hawkins (Kerril), John J. Carney (Sherm), Valentine Dyall (Norl)

Notes: This script was written by Chris Boucher especially for Michael Keating when Keating’s young daughter, watching an earlier Blake’s 7 episode, turned around and told her father his character was stupid! It also set the stage for a rematch between Paul Darrow and Colin Baker in the arguably forgettable 1985 Doctor Who story Timelash.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

A Dream of Jennifer

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyWhile shopping with Twiki for the components of an authentic 20th century hot tub, Buck thinks he spots a familiar face. He tries to follow her, but loses track of her and then sees her again at a spaceport the next day. Buck’s friends grow concerned about his insistence on looking for the woman who resembles his 20th century girlfriend Jennifer, but they help him track her down to the city that Buck once knew as New Orleans. When Buck does finally have a change to talk to her, she warns Buck that someone is trying to harm him – moments before two masked attackers pull a gun on both of them. Buck learns that the woman he has been following was the bait in a trap laid especially for him by a group of aliens who want him to destroy a shipment of Earth weapons to an allied world – a world these aliens are at war with. They threaten the woman’s life if Buck doesn’t cooperate, so he reluctantly goes along with the plan – but what he doesn’t expect to find is that Dr. Huer has sent Wilma along with the arms shipment to ensure its safe arrival.

Order the DVDswritten by Michael Bryant
directed by David G. Phinney
music by John Cacavas

Guest Cast: Paul Koslo (Commander Reeve), Gino Conforti (Sylvie), Mary Woronov (Nola), Anne Lockhart (Jennifer), Jessie Lawrence Ferguson (Lt. Hekoff), Cameron Young (Toby Kaplin), Shawn Michaels (Supervisor), Dennis Haysbert (Guard), Marsha Merchant (Clerk), Mitchell Young-Evans (Mime)

Notes: Anne Lockhart is the daughter of June Lockhart, who played the matriarch of the Robinson clan on Lost In Space. If you listen closely after Buck is turned away from the spaceport boarding gate, “Captain Christopher Pike” is paged on the P.A. system. Also, Dr. Huer reveals in this episode that he is a widower. Guest star Mary Woronov would later take over the role of Na’Toth – very briefly – in the second season of Babylon 5.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Children Of Auron

Blake's 7Cally’s twin sister, Zelda, sends out a telepathic distress signal when the planet Auron is ravaged by a plague which has, in fact, been unleashed on the pacifist Aurons by Servalan in an attempt to capture the Liberator and its crew.

written by Roger Parkes
directed by Andrew Morgan
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally, Zelda), Michael Keating (Vila), Jacqueline Pearce (Servalan), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), Rio Fanning (Deral), Ric Young (Ginka), Jack McKenzie (Patar), Beth Harris (CA Two), Ronald Leigh-Hunt (CA One), Sarah Atkinson (Franton), Michael Troughton (Pilot Four-Zero)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Space Rockers

Buck Rogers In The 25th CenturyDr. Huer lets Buck in on a troubling piece of information – the hottest band in the galaxy, Andromeda, seems to be spawning acts of violence among its young audience. An Earth Defense Directorate spy has infiltrated Andromeda’s interstellar road crew as their sound engineer, but when he’s discovered by Andromeda’s manager, he pays for it with his life. Even more disturbingly, Andromeda operates from a former military space station now known as MusicWorld, and the band’s manager, an ex-researcher named Lars Mangros, has written classified papers on a potential new method of mind control. Huer manages to get Buck a slot as a presenter for Andromeda’s next concert, a galaxy-wide broadcast which could wreak massive havoc with young people on hundreds of worlds. On MusicWorld, Buck discovers that Mangros is indeed planning to hide a mind-controlling frequency within the sound waves of Andromeda’s music, turning the galaxy’s youth into a mindless fighting force. Buck alerts the band to this plan, and they refuse to go ahead with the concert – and are promptly locked away, along with Buck. Now the only weapon Buck has is his cunning – and rock ‘n’ roll.

Order the DVDswritten by Chris Bunch & Allan Cole
directed by Guy Magar
music by Johnny Harris

Guest Cast: Jerry Orbach (Lars Mangros), Judy Landers (Joanna), Nancy Frangione (Karana), Leonard Lightfoot (Cirus), Jesse Goina (Rambeau), Paul LeClair (Tarkas), Richard Moll (Yarat), Jeff Harlan (Mark), Cynthia Lear (Elaine), Mitch Reta (Technician), Joseph Taggart (Security man)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Rumours Of Death

Blake's 7Avon sets out to avenge the death of his lover, Anna Grant. He kidnaps a Federation “prison psychologist” (torturer) whom he believes is responsible for her execution, but information gained from that encounter leads Avon and the crew back to Earth in a raid on Servalan’s mansion – which has been taken by a rebel group already – where Avon discovers that Anna was never killed…nor was she ever, in fact, alive.

written by Chris Boucher
directed by Fiona Cumming
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Jacqueline Pearce (Servalan), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac), John Bryans (Shrinker), Peter Clay (Chesku), Lorna Heilbron (Sula, Anna), Donald Douglas (Grenlee), David Haig (Forres), Philip Bloomfield (Balon), David Gillies (Hob)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Sarcophagus

Blake's 7After visiting a derelict alien “tomb-vessel,” Cally is inhabited by the soul of a long-dead creature who begins to take her shape, draining her of her energy, and takes over the ship and, one by one, the crew – except for Avon, the one member of the crew who is determined not to surrender into slavery. But the alien possessing Cally has predicted Avon’s presence and his resistance.

written by Tanith Lee
directed by Fiona Cumming
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Paul Darrow (Avon), Jan Chappell (Cally), Michael Keating (Vila), Steven Pacey (Tarrant), Josette Simon (Dayna), Peter Tuddenham (Zen, Orac)

LogBook entry by Earl Green