Carnival of Monsters

Doctor WhoInstead of arriving on the fabled blue planet, Metebelis 3, the Doctor and Jo materialize on board a ship in the Indian Ocean in what appears to be 1926. They soon discover, however, that they are in fact trapped in a “miniscope” – a transdimensional “ant farm” in which the humans are but one exhibit. The miniscope is the property of the rapscallion Vorg, a sort of cosmic carny from the planet Lurman who, with his assistant Shirna, is the first off-world visitor to the planet Inter Minor. He is not welcome there, as the local ruling class – officious, humorless bureaucrats – fail to find his portable zoo entertaining and fear that it may teem with germs and contagion. While Vorg awaits deportation and tries to rescue his “collection” (which include a few Ogrons and some nasty giant carnivorous worms called Drashigs), the Doctor finally emerges from the machine – inadvertently abetting the escape of the horrible Drashigs behind him.

Download this episodewritten by Robert Holmes
directed by Barry Letts
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Stuart Fell (Functionary), Michael Wisher (Kalik), Terence Lodge (Orum), Cheryl Hall (Shirna), Leslie Dwyer (Vorg), Tenniel Evans (Major Daly), Andrew Staines (Captain), Ian Marter (Andrews), Jenny McCracken (Claire Daly), Peter Halliday (Pletrac)

Broadcast from January 27 through February 17, 1973

LogBook entry & review by Robert Seulowitz […]

Frontier in Space

Doctor WhoAfter months of seething suspicion, Earth and Draconia are on the brink of all-out war, with small skirmishes and raids already taking place. As the TARDIS brings the Doctor and Jo into the fray, they discover that those raids are not all that they seem; the attacks are being carried out by neither Earth nor Draconia, but a third party trying to force the two worlds closer to the beginning of war. The Doctor is outraged to discover that this third party is the Master, working with a hired band of Ogron mercenaries, but the Doctor’s attempts to warn both the president of Earth and the royal house on Draconia go largely unheeded – until it is too late. The Doctor, Jo, and several skeptical humans and Draconians track the Master down, discovering that the war is only part of his plan. For the Master has enlisted the help of his deadliest allies yet: the Daleks.

written by Malcolm Hulke
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Roger Delgado (The Master), John Rees (Hardy), James Culliford (Stewart), Roy Pattison (Draconian Pilot), Peter Birrel (Draconian Prince), Vera Fusek (President), Michael Hawkins (Williams), Louis Mahoney (Newscaster), Karol Hagar (Secretary), Ray Lonn Ashton (Kemp), Lawrence Davidson (Draconian First Secretary), Timothy Craven (Guard), Luan Peters (Sheila), Caroline Hunt (Technician), Madhav Sharma (Patel), Richard Shaw (Cross), Dennis Bowen (Governor), Harold Goldblatt (Professor Dale), Laurence Harrington (Guard), Bill Wilde (Draconian Captain), Stephen Thorne, Michael Kilgarriff, Rick Lester (Ogrons), John Woodnutt (Emperor), Ian Frost (Draconian Messenger), Clifford Elkin (Earth Cruiser Captain), Bill Mitchell (Newscaster), Ramsay Williams (Brook), Stanley Price (Pilot), John Scott Martin, Cy Town, Murphy Grumbar (Daleks), Michael Wisher (Dalek voices)

Broadcast from February 24 through March 31, 1973

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green […]

The Six Million Dollar Man

The Six Million Dollar ManFormer lunar astronaut Steve Austin takes on the sometimes dangerous career of test piloting experimental aircraft after retiring from NASA. During one test flight, the experimental plane he’s flying crash-lands after a series of system failures. Austin loses both legs, his right arm, and his left eye in the resulting explosion. Dr. Rudy Wells, a former NASA doctor who followed Austin out of the space program, knows that bionic prosthetics could save Austin’s life and restore his mobility – and then some – but doesn’t have the budget for such an experimental procedure.

Enter Oliver Spencer, director of the secret Office of Special Operations, who has a six million dollar budget to create the perfect secret agent. He originally envisioned a robot that could pass for human, but the time and money to create such a machine exceeds what the OSO has available. He offers to finances Austin’s recovery and Dr. Well’s highly unusual prosthetic surgery, but at a price: Steve Austin will become a government agent with strength and abilities beyond those of most men. His first assignment is to free a kidnapped hostage being held in a remote area of Saudi Arabia. Austin has the ability to save the hostage, but what he doesn’t have is the knowledge that the entire operation is a trap.

teleplay by Henri Simoun
based on the novel “Cyborg” by Martin Caidin
directed by Richard Irving
music by Gil Melle

The Six Million Dollar ManCast: Lee Majors (Steve Austin), Barbara Anderson (Jean Manners), Martin Balsam (Dr. Rudy Wells), Darren McGavin (Oliver Spencer), Dorothy Green (Mrs. McKay), Anne Whitfield (Young Woman), George Wallace (General), Robert Cornthwaite (Dr. AShburn), Olan Soule (Saltillo), Norma Storch (Woman), John Mark Robinson (Aide), Charles Knox Robinson (Prisoner), Ivor Barry (Geraldton), Maurice Sherbanee (Nudaylah)

The Six Million Dollar ManNotes: In syndicated rerun packages, this movie was split into two one-hour episodes titled The Moon And The Desert Part 1 and Part 2. Unlike the remainder of The Six Million Dollar Man on TV (and unlike the original 1972 novel “Cyborg”), Steve Austin is portrayed here as a civilian astronaut/test pilot with a disdain for the military; the next Six Million Dollar Man TV movie retcons him into an Air Force colonel. This is the only appearance of Darren McGavin as Oliver Spencer; the character was replaced with Oscar Goldman in the next movie, while Dr. Wells would be recast.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Moment Of Madness

SearchCameron is kidnapped from inside PROBE Control, and there are few clues as to where he’s gone. C.R. Grover leads the search for Cameron, but he finds that even Cameron’s own niece – the only family member anyone can find – has little knowledge of Cameron’s private life. Cameron finds himself trapped in a cage, with an interrogator repeatedly asking him where and how someone will arrive. Cameron eventually recognizes his captor as a soldier who he once conditioned during the Korean War to give the enemy false information, and expresses great remorse…but that doesn’t mean he won’t keep fighting to escape.

written by Richard Landau
directed by George McCowan
music by Dominic Frontiere

SearchCast: Doug McClure (C.R. Grover), Burgess Meredith (Cameron), Patrick O’Neal (Ralph Byron), Brooke Bundy (Virginia Carr), Keith Andes (Dr. Barnett), James B. Sikking (Callas), Jan Merlin (O’Toole), Frank Maxwell (General Hack), Lenore Kasdorf (Addie), Soon-Teck Oh (Interrogator), Robert Brubaker (Dr. Weld), Tom Hallick (Harris), Pamela Jones (Miss James), Bill McConnell (Corning)

Notes: Brooke Bundy, appearing as Cameron’s niece, would go on to be the first (but certainly not last) chief engineer audiences would meet aboard the new Enterprise in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Godzilla vs. Megalon

GodzillaAn underground nuclear test in the Aleutian Islands has widespread environmental effects, even as far away as Monster Island in the South Pacific. Godzilla and the other monsters are in distress and attempt to escape the earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and storms.

The effects are also felt in Japan, where inventor Goro Ibuki, his son Rokuro, and Goro’s friend Hiroshi Jinkawa are enjoy a day at the lake. An earthquake creates a crack in the lake bed, draining the water underground. The day ruined, they return to Ibuki’s home, where the door is unlocked and open. They are attacked by several mysterious men, who flee. Hiroshi gives chase, but they manage to escape. The attackers were apparently trying to find information about the robot Ibuki is building. The leave behind an unusual red sand, which is revealed to have come from deep undersea.

Now completed, the robot is activated and named “Jet Jaguar.” The mysterious agents snatch Rokuro and use him as ploy to get into the house, using a sleep gas to knock out the two men and the boy. Receiving orders from the Emperor of Seatopia, they program the robot to lead Megalon to “the target.”

At the undersea kingdom of Seatopia, Emperor Antonio informs his subjects they are going to war against the Earth because the nuclear testing has already destroyed a third of the country. He unleashes the giant monster Megalon. The giant winged beetle with a glowing antenna and sharp, serrated claws rises to the surface.

A Seatopian agent has tied up Ibuki and his son in the back of a truck and is heading toward the cracked lake, with plans to take them to the undersea kingdom. Back at the house, Hiroshi breaks free from his bonds, knocks out a Seatopian agent, and escapes to rescue the others.

Megalon arrives at the lake, meeting Jet Jaguar who leads him to Tokyo. The city is being evacuated, and army units are being sent in. The truck drivers throw the Seatopian out of the cab, and decide to dump the container with Ibuki and his son into the dam instead of going to the lake. Megalon interrupts their task and they run off. The monster smashes the dam, releasing the water into the valley below. The container slips off the truck, but Megalon bats it over the mountain. The doors crack open spilling out the pair.

The army is making a valiant attempt to stop Megalon before he gets to Tokyo, but the beast breaks through the line and uses a laser emitting from his antenna to destroy the defenders. In an army helicopter, Ibuki uses the transmitter to override the Seatopian programming and sends Jet Jaguar to get Godzilla. Realizing the King of the Monsters will arrive soon, the Seatopians request assistance from Space Hunter Nebula M, who send Gigan.

Megalon arrives in Tokyo and uses his antenna laser to destroy huge sections of the city. Jet Jaguar meets with Ibuki and reports that Godzilla is on the way. However, Ibuki no longer controls the robot – it has reprogrammed itself “for survival.” It flies to meet Megalon, and grows to match the monster’s size in order to do battle.

Jet Jaguar is barely able to hold his own against Megalon, when Gigan appears. Caught between the two monsters, the robot tries to fly off. But Megalon knocks him out of the sky with his antenna laser. On the ground, the beasts knock Jet Jaguar around. Just as it appears hopeless, Godzilla arrives and throws some kaiju karate moves on Megalon and Gigan while Jet Jaguar licks his wounds.

Both of the monsters are seriously injured and lying on the ground. Gigan manages to get back up, flies toward Godzilla, and slashes Godzilla in the shoulder with the buzz-saw blade in his abdomen, This enrages Godzilla, who blasts the space monster with his nuclear breath, knocking it out of the sky. Gigan threatens to decapitate Jet Jaguar, but Godilla blasts Gigan again, who retreats to Megalon. The creatures surround Godzilla and Jet Jaguar with a ring of fire, but the robot lifts Godzilla out of the inferno. The allies thrash Megalon and Gigan, causing Gigan to flee like a wounded bully back to Space Hunter Nebula M. Godzilla and Jet Jaguar continue to beat on Megalon, who falls into a crevice that leads back to Seatopia.

Defeated, the Emperor orders all exits to the surface closed. Godzilla returns to Monster Island. Jet Jaguar shrinks to human size and returns to his creator.

written by Shinichi Sekizawa
directed by Jun Fukuda
music by Riichiro Manabe

Human Cast: Katsuhiko Sasaki (Goro Ibuki), Hiroyuki Kawase (Rokuro Ibuki), Yutaka Hayashi (Hiroshi Jinkawa), Robert Dunham (Seatopia Emperor Antonio)

Monster Cast: Godzilla, Megalon, Jet Jaguar, Rodan, Angirus

Notes: Jet Jaguar was based on a design created by a school child as part of a Toho-sponsored contest. He was originally intended to be in his own movie, but studio execs didn’t think he could stand alone. The English language translation pronounces the robot’s name as “Jet Jag-you-are.” While there is no “official” DVD release of this movie in North America, it does show up on TV from time to time, and there is a Mystery Science Theater 3000 version on DVD.

LogBook entry by Robert Parson

Genesis II

Genesis IIIn 1979, NASA researcher Dylan Hunt volunteers to become the first human test subject of a process of suspended animation that he has helped to develop for long space journeys. Rather than freezing its subjects, Hunt’s process relies on a special combination of drugs and a chamber pressurized with a mixture of gases that shut down the body’s metabolic processes without killing the subject. During the pressurization of Hunt’s sleeping chamber, a major earthquake strikes the underground facility, forcing the scientists there to evacuate. Dylan Hunt is left behind, buried alive beneath Carlsbad Caverns.

Hunt is awakened by a team that obviously isn’t working for NASA, and is told that it is now 2133. The underground caverns are occupied by an organization called PAX, but Hunt’s caretaker, Lyra-A, isn’t a member of PAX. She’s a mutant – as can be seen by her second navel – and claims that PAX is a civilization of warmongers, masquerading as pacifists, lurking underground and waiting to strike at the more civilized people who live on Earth’s surface. Hunt accepts Lyra-A’s offer of an escape to her city, Tyrannia, only to find an oppressive mutant regime enslaving humans.

written by Gene Roddenberry
directed by John Llewellyn Moxey
music by Harry Sukman

Genesis IICast: Alex Cord (Dylan Hunt), Mariette Hartley (Lyra-a), Ted Cassidy (Isiah), Percy Rodrigues (Primus Kimbridge), Harvey Jason (Singh), Titos Vandis (Primus Yuloff), Bill Striglos (Kellum), Lynne Marta (Primus Harper-Smythe), Harry Raybold (Slan-n), Majel Barrett (Primus Dominic), Leon Askin (Overseer), Liam Dunn (Janos), Scott Graham (Tyranian Teacher), Ed Ashley (Wehr-r), Linda Grant (Astrid), Robert Swan (Lahyn-n), Beulah Quo (Primus Lu Chan), Dennis Robertson (General), Ray Young (Tyranian Teacher #2), Tom Pace (Brian), Teryl Willis (Cardiologist), David Westburg (Station Operator), Robert Hathaway (Shuttle Car Operator), Tammi Bula (Teenager)

Genesis IINotes: If Gene Roddenberry liked working with you that one time, Gene Roddenberry will hire you again. Cases in point: Ted Cassidy played Ruk in the Star Trek episode What Are Little Girls Made Of?, while Mariette Hartley guest starred in one of the final original Trek episodes, All Our Yesterdays. Percy Rodrigues put Captain Kirk on trial in Court-Martial, and appeared in other genre series such as The Starlost and the television incarnation of Planet Of The Apes before going on to become one of the 1970s’ most frequently employed movie trailer voice-over Genesis IIartists. Dylan Hunt would be recast in his next TV adventure (1974’s Planet Earth), and would be renamed (but not recast) for one last try-out in the 20th century, 1975’s Strange New World; Roddenberry’s Dylan Hunt/PAX concept wouldn’t be revisited further until a space-based revamp transformed it into the 21st century syndicated series Gene Roddenberry’s Andromeda, for which all of the earlier attempts nearly 30 years earlier can be regarded misfired pilots.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Planet of the Daleks

Doctor WhoThe TARDIS continues toward the planet Spiridon, the location of the hidden Dalek army that could overrun the entire galaxy. The injured Doctor falls into a self-induced healing coma, leaving Jo few instructions. When the TARDIS lands, Jo ventures out into the poisonous jungle on Spiridon, eventually encountering a military expedition of Thals, the Daleks’ mortal enemies from Skaro. The Thals manage to get the Doctor to safety and join him on a mission to keep the Dalek army from launching its offensive. The invisible natives of Spiridon, enslaved by the Daleks, are another hazard, along with the lethal vegetation. When the Dalek Supreme arrives to lead its army into battle, it appears that the Doctor may be too late to stop his old rivals.

written by Terry Nation
directed by David Maloney and Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Bernard Horsfall (Taron), Prentis Hancock (Vaber), Tim Preece (Codal), Roy Skelton (Wester), Jane How (Rebec), Hilary Minster (Marat), Alan Tucker (Latep), Tony Starr (Dalek Supreme), John Scott Martin, Murphy Grumbar, Cy Town (Daleks), Michael Wisher, Roy Skelton (Dalek voices)

Broadcast from April 7 through May 12, 1973

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green […]

Slaves Of Jedikiah – Part 1

Tomorrow PeopleYoung Stephen Jameson walks through London, unaware that two very different groups of people are monitoring him closely. He suffers some sort of attack, crumples to the ground, and is rushed to a hospital. When he wakes up, he meets a young woman named Carol, one of his observers, who tells him that he has experienced his “breaking out” – the moment when he evolved from homo sapiens to homo superior, one of the Tomorrow People, the next stage in human evolution. He has mental powers beyond those of most people, and must learn to control those powers to serve a higher good. Two men dressed as doctors appear, but they’re not doctors – they’re members of the other faction watching Stephen’s progress. He is taken to their master, Jedikiah, who intends to harness Stephen’s powers for less noble purposes.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Francis de Wolff (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Patricia Denys (Mrs. Jameson), Peter Weston (Policeman), Neville Barber (Dr. Stewart), Christine Shaw (Staff Nurse)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Slaves Of Jedikiah – Part 2

Tomorrow PeopleJedikiah and his thugs interrogate Stephen, trying to gauge his emerging powers while learning more about their rivals, the Tomorrow People. Using the telekinetic ability of Jimmy, the youngest Tomorrow Person, Carol and John, the team’s leader, home in on where Stephen is being held, and rescue him from Jedikiah and an entity known only as Cyclops. The return to their top-secret base, built into an abandoned section of the London Underground, introducing Stephen to TIM, the sentient computer whose information helps to guide their efforts. There’s just one problem: Stephen isn’t entirely in control of his actions.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Francis de Wolff (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Robert Bridges (Cyclops), Patricia Denys (Mrs. Jameson), Peter Weston (Policeman)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Slaves Of Jedikiah – Part 3

Tomorrow PeopleCarol and John discover that something has happened to their base: TIM is offline, which means that their longer-distance ability to “jaunt”, or teleport, is not available. When they arrive at their base, they discover that Jedikiah and his minions lie in wait for them; an attempt to jaunt to safety leaves them trapped in hyperspace. Now only Kenny remains to fend off the invasion of the Tomorrow People’s base.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Francis de Wolff (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Robert Bridges (Cyclops)

Notes: It is revealed that the Tomorrow People have jaunted to other planets and met non-human forms of life, none of which are meant to visit Earth because it is a “closed” planet.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Green Death

Doctor WhoProblems at a Welsh mining operation draw the attention of UNIT. The Brigadier is frustrated by the usual lack of cooperation from the mining company, Global Chemicals, but the Doctor is more interested in the rash of mysterious deaths among Global’s miners. He goes down into the mine himself to learn more about the glowing green ooze that has killed almost every miner who has touched it, and discovers a horrifying sight – giant maggots, mutated to a grotesque size by Global’s waste chemicals, are secreting the deadly substance and may even be growing hostile enough to attack humans. Despite this revelation (and the well-meaning interference of local environmental protesters), however, Global Chemicals’ chairman refuses to shut down the mines – and it soon becomes evident that someone else is in charge of the operation, someone or something whose sinister motives may include allowing the poisonous insect larvae to reach the surface and hatch into equally deadly giant insects.

Download this episodewritten by Robert Sloman
directed by Michael Briant
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Nicholas Courtney (Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart), John Levene (Sergeant Benton), Richard Franklin (Captain Yates), Stewart Bevan (Professor Clifford Jones), Jerome Willis (Stevens), John Scott Martin (Hughes), Ben Howard (Hinks), Tony Adams (Elgin), Mostyn Evans (Dai Evans), Ray Handy (Milkman), Talfryn Thomas (Dave), Roy Evans (Bert), John Dearth (voice of BOSS), John Rolfe (Fell), Terry Walsh, Billy Horrigan, Brian Justice, Alan Chuntz (Guards), Mitzi McKenzie (Nancy), Jean Burgess (Cleaner), Roy Skelton (James), Richard Beale (Minister of Ecology)

Broadcast from May 19 through June 23, 1973

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green […]

Slaves Of Jedikiah – Part 4

Tomorrow PeopleJohn and Carol have regained control of TIM and the base, and free Stephen from the silencing band that soaks up his telepathic ability, but Kenny has been abducted by Jedikiah. Jedikiah sheds his human disguise, revealing himself as a robot controlled by the alien Cyclops. Base at their base, John, Carol and Stephen discover that Cyclops is on a spacecraft, speeding toward Earth, where he expects to take control, somehow using their talents.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Francis de Wolff (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Robert Bridges (Cyclops)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Slaves Of Jedikiah – Part 5

Tomorrow PeopleTIM refuses to go along with the plan to jaunt John, Carol and Stephen into the alien ship at the same time and in the same place, depositing Carol elsewhere on the ship. The damaged Jedikiah robot goes mad and begins blasting its way into other areas of the ship, causing severe damage. Cyclops begs the Tomorrow People for help…but can it be trusted?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Francis de Wolff (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Robert Bridges (Cyclops)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Medusa Strain – Part 1

Tomorrow PeopleIn deep space, Jedikiah floats through eternity for 500 years until rescued by the flamboyant captain of a passing spaceship, who supplies him with enough power to change his shape again. On the ship, a young boy is being held, a youth whose unique abilities are not unlike those of the Tomorrow People already encountered by Jedikiah, but he is kept from using those powers by the threat of a brain-sapping Medusa creature being unleashed upon him. Jedikiah, obsessed with revenge upon the Tomorrow People, harnesses the boy’s gift for time travel. On Earth, time stops.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Roger Price
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Roger Bizley (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Roger Booth (Robowski), Richard Speight (Peter), Dave Prowse (Android), Norman McGlen (The Medusa)

Tomorrow PeopleNotes: Yes, that’s future Darth Vader David Prowse, as you’ve never seen him before, nearly in the buff and painted gold as Robowski’s android servant. Both before and after his work on Star Wars, Prowse was a mainstay of British sci-fi monster suits, with appearances in Doctor Who, Space: 1999, and The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Battle For The Planet Of The Apes

Planet Of The ApesThe riots started by Caesar’s uprising were only the beginning; a bloody war followed in which humanity’s great cities were razed to the ground. Reduced to a primitive state, humans and apes try to co-exist peacefully according to Caesar’s wishes, and according to a simple set of laws: ape must never kill ape, and no human may ever say “no” to an ape again. But the truce is an uneasy one, and Caesar constantly has to keep the peace. With his human confidante MacDonald and an ape scientist named Virgil, Caesar decides to set out for the radioactive ruins of Los Angeles to retrieve archived video recordings of his parents, Cornelius and Zira, who are rumored to have spoken extensively of Earth’s history – effectively revealing the future. But L.A. isn’t unoccupied: Kolp, formerly Governor Breck’s security chief, has taken charge of a city of radiation-scarred human militants. When Caesar’s scouting party trips the alarms, Kolp’s men try to capture them, at first orders to capture them alive, but he then orders his men to shoot to kill. Caesar and his party escape, enraging Kolp. Kolp decides to form his own search party, to find Caesar’s people and wipe them out.

Returning home, though, Caesar is accosted by General Aldo, the gorilla leader of the apes’ security forces. Aldo demands to know where Caesar went and why, and is clearly not satisfied by Caesar’s cryptic explanation. That night, when his pet escapes, Caesar’s son tries to track it down and overhears Aldo rallying the gorillas for a takeover of the ape community; Aldo discovers this and critically injures the boy. While Caesar is distracted, the humans mount their first attack on the apes, and Aldo uses this as an excuse to imprison all of the humans living peacefully in the ape city and seize power by force. Kolp’s attack is routed, but Aldo’s thirst for revenge isn’t satisfied so easily: he wants even the peaceful humans in the city executed. When Caesar learns the truth about what happened to his son, he attacks Aldo, seeking vengeance…but in doing so, has Caesar merely sown the seeds of distrust that will eventually destroy the world?

Order the DVDsstory by Paul Dehn
screenplay by John William Corrington & Joyce Hooper Corrington
directed by J. Lee Thompson
music by Leonard Rosenman

Cast: Roddy McDowall (Caesar), Claude Akins (Aldo), Natalie Trundy (Lisa), Severn Darden (Kolp), Law Ayres (Mandemus), Paul Williams (Virgil), Austin Stoker (MacDonald), Noah Keen (Teacher), Richard Eastham (Mutant Captain), France Nuyen (Alma), Paul Stevens (Mendez), Heather Lowe (Doctor), Bobby Porter (Cornelius), Michael Stearns (Jake), Cal Wilson (Soldier), Pat Cardi (Young Chimp), John Landis (Jake’s Friend), Andy Knight (Mutant on motorcycle), John Huston (The Lawgiver)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Medusa Strain – Part 2

Tomorrow PeopleJust returned from hyperspace, Carol and Stephen seem to be the only people on Earth who aren’t frozen in their tracks. Even TIM is frozen, forcing the two to make short jaunts across London to see if anyone else is moving or alive. They find a handful of strangely dressed people robbing the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London, one of whom is a boy being forced to help them. Stephen is able to escape, while Carol is captured by the robbers and taken back to their spaceship. Only too late does Carol realize that one of her captors is Jedikiah.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Roger Price
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Roger Bizley (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Roger Booth (Robowski), Richard Speight (Peter), Dave Prowse (Android), Norman McGlen (The Medusa)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Medusa Strain – Part 3

Tomorrow PeopleJedikiah once again forces Carol and Peter, the boy from the future, to wear silencer bands that rob them of their abilities as Tomorrow People. Jedikiah then threatens to kill Carol unless Peter programs the time travel device to allow Jedikiah to prevent the Tomorrow People from becoming a dominant force in history. The raid on the secret base in 1973 goes awry, though, thanks to Ginge, who has stuck around to help John and the others. John and Stephen prepare to rescue Carol, but only put themselves in further danger.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Roger Price
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Roger Bizley (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Roger Booth (Robowski), Richard Speight (Peter), Dave Prowse (Android), Norman McGlen (The Medusa)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Medusa Strain – Part 4

Tomorrow PeopleJedikiah is so obsessed with destroying the Tomorrow People that he turns against his allies. Despite this, he nearly succeeds in neutralizing their power. Only Carol and Peter can save their own kind (with some help from Ginge), and their best hope is to use Jedikiah’s newfound fixation of time travel against him.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Roger Price
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Roger Bizley (Jedikiah), Michael Standing (Ginge), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Roger Booth (Robowski), Richard Speight (Peter), Dave Prowse (Android), Norman McGlen (The Medusa)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Vanishing Earth – Part 1

Tomorrow PeopleSevere storms and violent volcanic eruptions are increasing in frequency the world over; John decides that it’s up to the Tomorrow People to do something about it…but even John admits that it may be far beyond their powers. At a seaside amusement arcade, Ginge finds a pleasant distraction in the person of a young woman named Joy, and then finds himself in a metallic world populated by robots…and by something of a decidedly more organic nature called Spidron.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Kenneth Farrington (Smithers), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Kevin Stoney (Steen), John Woodnutt (Spidron), Nova Llewellyn (Joy), David Weston (No. 300), Bara Chambers (Control voice)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Vanishing Earth – Part 2

Tomorrow PeopleLefty returns to the Tomorrow People’s base to report Ginge’s disappearance, and Stephen returns with him to look for Ginge. Carol and John are still preoccupied with studying the outbreak of storms and volcanic eruptions, but when they return to their base, TIM tells them not only of Stephen’s mission, but that it may represent an immediate danger to Stephen. When Stephen and Lefty enter the same haunted house in which Ginge vanished, only Lefty emerges; Stephen is dumped at sea and retrieved by an older man who has been watching all of this activity. Carol and John try to stop him from taking Stephen…only to watch him disappear.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Kenneth Farrington (Smithers), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Kevin Stoney (Steen), John Woodnutt (Spidron), Nova Llewellyn (Joy), David Weston (No. 300), Bara Chambers (Control voice)

Notes: We find out that Ginge’s given name is Ginger Hardy.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Vanishing Earth – Part 3

Tomorrow PeopleJohn and Carol return to their base, and are stunned to find Stephen is there, in perfectly good health, but with no memory of how he got there. Even TIM can’t remember Stephen’s return. They jaunt back to the scene of the crime, discovering that the older man who carried Stephen out of the water is a galactic policeman hunting an alien criminal named Spidron…and that, thanks to the presence of the Tomorrow People, Earth’s status as a “closed planet” off-limits to aliens has been lifted, endangering the planet.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Kenneth Farrington (Smithers), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Kevin Stoney (Steen), John Woodnutt (Spidron), Nova Llewellyn (Joy)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Vanishing Earth – Part 4

Tomorrow PeopleSpidron and Steen confront each other, though Spidron seems to make a quick getaway – if, indeed, he was ever there and not appearing in holographic form. John and the Tomorrow People ask Steen, a law enforcement officer for a galactic federation, for help in either saving Earth or evacuating some of its people to another suitable planet. Steen reveals that, with Earth’s primitive state of development, it’s not an important enough planet to merit such extraordinary measures. John, Carol and the others take it upon themselves to prove otherwise by trying to stop Spidron with all of the powers at their disposal.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Brian Finch and Roger Price
directed by Paul Bernard
music by Dudley Simpson

Tomorrow PeopleCast: Sammie Winmill (Carol), Nicholas Young (John), Peter Vaughan-Clarke (Stephen), Stephen Salmon (Kenny), Kenneth Farrington (Smithers), Michael Standing (Ginge), Derek Crewe (Lefty), Philip Gilbert (TIM), Kevin Stoney (Steen), John Woodnutt (Spidron), Nova Llewellyn (Joy)

Tomorrow PeopleNotes: This is the final appearance of either Carol or Kenny in the series; both actors elected to move on after the first season was produced, leaving no time for a formal farewell scene to be written. The first episode of the second season would provide an explanation for their departure while introducing new cast members.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Unseen Alibi

Orson Welles' Great MysteriesInvited to London by a fashion model he only just met, American bachelor Jerry arrives at the appointed place, at the appointed time, opens the door of her apartment, and walks in. He a framed photo of a man, and then stumbles upon the corpse of the man in that photo, dead of a stab wound. In his panic, Jerry accidentally finds the murder weapon nearby, leaving his fingerprints on it. He panics and runs, only to be arrested by police waiting just outside the door of the apartment. Jerry is now the prime suspect in a murder, though he can produce no evidence or witnesses to exonerate himself. What he doesn’t know is that he’s walked innocently into an elaborate crime to be the decoy for the real killers.

Orson Welles' Great Mysteriesteleplay by Kenneth Jupp
based on a story by Bruce Graeme
directed by Mark Cullingham
theme music by John Barry

Cast: Dean Stockwell (Jerry Norton), Joss Ackland (Inspector Hud), Lewis Wilson (Police Sergeant), Raymond Skipp (Police Constable), James Ottaway (Hotel Porter), Gary Myers (Burford), Orson Welles (Narrator)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Power Pirate

Super FriendsPower failures wreak havoc around the world, and Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, and superheroes-in-training Marvin and Wendy (and their faithful pet Wonder Dog) gather at the Hall of Justice to try to keep on top of all of the incidents. Everything from electrical power to steam power is likely to fail, and nearly everywhere any of the Justice League members go, the dapper Sir Cedric Cedric of Scotland Yard is already on the case, investigating the power problems for himself. Or is he? Is his presence at almost every incident a mere coincidence…and is he even who he claims to be?

story by Fred Freiberger, Bernie Kahn, Ken Rotcop, Art Weiss, Willie Gilbert, Henry Sharp, and Marshall Williams
Super Friendsdirected by Charles A. Nicholas
music by Hoyt Curtin

Cast: Sherry Alberoni (Wendy), Norman Alden (Aquaman), Danny Dark (Superman), Shannon Farnon (Wonder Woman), Casey Kasem (Robin), Ted Knight (Narrator), Olan Soule (Batman), John Stephenson (Sir Cedric Cedric / Alien), Frank Welker (Marvin / Wonder Dog)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Beyond The Farthest Star

Star Trek ClassicStardate 5221.3: Near the edge of the galaxy, a powerful gravitational force has seized the Enterprise. Sulu is able to alter the ship’s course just enough to go into orbit around the dead stellar core which is the source of the gravity, rather than crashing into it. Also in orbit is a vessel of organic origins, with a structure that indicates two things – the ship was built by insectoid beings, and those beings appear to have destroyed themselves. A log entry recorded by one of the aliens warns of the presence of a malevolent life form, prompting Kirk and his landing party to return to the Enterprise – only to discover that whatever attacked the insectoids has now beamed aboard with them.

Season 1 Regular Voice Cast: William Shatner (Captain Kirk), Leonard Nimoy (Mr. Spock), DeForest Kelley (Dr. McCoy), James Doohan (Mr. Scott), George Takei (Lt. Sulu), Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura), James Doohan (Lt. Arrex), Majel Barrett (Nurse Chapel)

Order the DVDswritten by Samuel A. Peeples
directed by Hal Sutherland
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

Guest Voice Cast: James Doohan (Alien Voice), James Doohan (Insectoid Captain), James Doohan (Transporter Chief)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Departure And Arrival

Moonbase 3After a psychologically unstable pilot’s condition is quietly ignored by the crew of Moonbase 3, he commits suicide during a spacewalk, leaving Dr. Ransome, the Moonbase administrator, with only minimal astronautics training to fly his shuttle. The shuttle is destroyed when Ransome tries to pull off a daring maneuver that any trained pilot would never have even considered. The incident places the future of Moonbase 3 – considered by Earthbound authorities to be a costly “extravagance” – in jeopardy.

Dr. David Caulder is appointed to succeed Ransome as the administrator in charge of Moonbase 3, and Michel Lebrun – who thought he was next in line for the job – prepares to resign in protest. Caulder seems affable enough and eager to learn about life on a permanent outpost on the moon, but just as the crew warms to him, he begins a no-nonsense investigation into Ransome’s death, catching them off guard. Blame is placed and fingers are pointed, and Caulder finally reads his verdict to the three ranking officials on Moonbase 3: he holds them all personally responsible for the deadly incident, and will personally escort all of them home to face formal charges. But after their shuttle lifts off from the Moonbase, it becomes clear that someone aboard has taken steps to ensure that its passengers – and Caulder’s damning report – will never reach Earth…

written by Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts
directed by Ken Hannam
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Donald Houston (David Caulder), Ralph Bates (Michel Lebrun), Fiona Gaunt (Helen Smith), Barry Lowe (Tom Hill), Madhav Sharma (Rao), Michael Lees (Ransome), Michael Wisher (Sanders), Jonathan Sweet (Walters), Peter Bathurst (Director General), Robert La Brassiere (Bill Jackson), Patsy Trench (Jenny), Mary Ann Severne (Sandy), Christine Bradwell (Ingrid), Victor Beaumont (Franz Hauser), Elma Soiron (Madame Carnac), Peter Miles (Dr. Laubenthal)

Notes: Moonbase 3 (the fictional setting) is controlled by the “European Community,” lending Moonbase 3 (the show) an unusual bit of foresight in predicting the European Union. Moonbases 1 and 2 are controlled by, respectively, the United States and Russia (though not the Soviet Union, a body which most assuredly did exist at the time of Moonbase 3’s production – score another point for foresight), and Moonbase 4 is controlled by China. The series came about when BBC bosses asked Terrance Dicks and Barry Letts – the then-script editor and producer of Jon Pertwee-era Doctor Who – if they’d like to do an original SF series of their own to air during Doctor Who’s “off-season.” Moonbase 3 was the result, though both Dicks and Letts have said that there are things they would change about the show if they were to do it again, not the least of which is the show’s grim tone (which, to be fair, seems to be present in a great many SF TV series in the early 1970s). Moonbase 3 was mounted as an international co-production produced by the BBC with financial backing from ABC and 20th Century Fox on the American end of things, but it didn’t make a splash in the ratings on either side of the Atlantic. Ironically, the fact that the series was shown in America is the only reason it still exists today: as with many BBC series made in the 1960s and early ’70s, including many a classic episode of Doctor Who, Moonbase 3 was “purged” from the BBC archives and was only recoverable by way of the American master tapes.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Yesteryear

Star Trek ClassicStardate 5373.4: A visit to the Guardian of Forever goes wrong somehow, erasing Spock from history. Though the Vulcan returns to the 23rd century along with Kirk, no one recognizes Spock, and an Andorian named Thalen is serving as the Enterprise’s first officer. Spock uses the Guardian to travel 30 years into his own past, at the point when the new timeline’s history says Spock died as a boy on Vulcan. Passing himself off as his own cousin, Spock watches as his younger self sneaks away in the night, scared to undergo a grueling rite of passage. The younger Spock is followed by I’Chiya, his aging pet sehlat, who sacrifices its life to save Spock from a predatory creature. Having saved his own life, the elder Spock now worries that the unexpected death of I’Chiya may change his future yet again.

Order the DVDswritten by D.C. Fontana
directed by Hal Sutherland
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

Star TrekGuest Voice Cast: Mark Lenard (Sarek), James Doohan (Commander Thalen), Majel Barrett (Amanda Grayson), James Doohan (Officer #1), James Doohan (Officer #2), Majel Barrett (Historian), James Doohan (Alien Historian), James Doohan (Vulcan Healer), James Doohan (Guardian of Forever)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Behemoth

Moonbase 3The unexplained disappearance of two astronauts conducting a survey on the surface of the moon brings the prospect of further moonwalks to a halt. Caulder orders no further moonwalks in the survey area, which infuriates seismologist Dr. Heinz Laubenthal, whose studies have concentrated on that very area – though he refuses to say why he’s so interested in it. A mysterious accident depressurizes the seismology lab, exposing it to cold vacuum and killing Laubenthal; rumors begin to run rampant that his experiments on the moon’s surface may have awakened some previously undiscovered life form which is now seeking revenge. Other moonbases pick up on the rumor and a siege mentality quickly sets in. Caulder decides to lift his ban on exploration in Mare Frigoris and personally investigate what’s going on – but if something or someone evil is behind the disappearances, even he may not survive this mission.

written by John Brason
directed by Ken Hannam
music by Dudley Simpson

Cast: Donald Houston (David Caulder), Ralph Bates (Michel Lebrun), Fiona Gaunt (Helen Smith), Barry Lowe (Tom Hill), John Hallam (Peter Conway), Tom Kempinski (Stephen Partness), Peter Miles (Heinz Laubenthal), Garrick Hagon (Bruno Ponti), Dennis de Marne (Guido Mirandelli), Jurgen Anderson (Per Bengison), John Moreno (Alan Benavente), Derek Anders (Dr. Andrew Robertson), Robert La Bassiere (Bill Jackson), Anthony Chinn (Cheng), Christine Bradwell (Ingrid), Cy Town (Technician), Ken Haward (Foreman)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

One Of Our Planets Is Missing

Star Trek ClassicStardate 5372.3: The Enterprise crew watches helplessly as an enormous cloud engulfs an entire planet, and discover that it is headed for the heavily populated planet Mantilles. The Enterprise, pursuing the cloud, is also swallowed by it. From inside the cloud, Spock determines that it is a living organism. Kirk decides that the organism must be destroyed, but Spock finds that this can only be accomplished by unleashing an enormous amount of energy which would also destroy the Enterprise. The only hope for the people of Mantilles is an unconventional mind-meld between Spock and the planet-consuming life form.

Order the DVDswritten by Marc Daniels
directed by Hal Sutherland
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

Guest Voice Cast: James Doohan (Governor Wesley), Majel Barrett (The Organism)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Voyage Of Discovery

The StarlostAfter returning from exile as punishment for sacrelige, Devon returns to the rustic farming community of which he is a member, still bitter that he will not be permitted to marry a woman named Rachel. Devon demands a second opinion, and so the town’s preacher asks the computer system – a device which gives him direct access to his Creator, and which he refuses to question or second-guess – and it once again declares Devon an unfit genetic match for Rachel, regardless of her feelings for him. Devon refuses to stop his attempts to interrupt the impending marriage of Rachel and Garth, and is cast out from his community again. But when Devon learns that the “voice of the Creator” is actually programmed by the preacher himself, a new decree is issue: Devon must be purged from the gene pool. He ventures into a remote cave with a torch-and-pitchfork-toting mob hot on his heels – and a metallic hatch closes behind him. Devon discovers himself in an enormous chamber filled with technology the likes of which he has never seen. He stumbles across a talking console which reveals to him the truth about this place: his village is part of an agrarian biosphere, one of many biospheres clustered together to form an enormous spacefaring vessel called Earthship Ark. Constructed between the Earth and the moon and launched after a catastrophe in the year 2285, Earthship Ark’s sealed biospheres contained a representative sampling of Earth’s flora, fauna and cultures, carrying them away from their dead homeworld and seeking a solar system around a class G star, capable of supporting life.

But Devon doesn’t even know what space is, the people in his biosphere dome having reverted to a more primitive way of life (and yet one that acknowledges the prefabricated boundaries of the world, computer equipment, and other anachronisms). The machine tells him that 100 years into Earthship Ark’s multi-generational flight, an unspecified accident occurred, and the command module containing the Ark’s bridge, from which its flight was guided, was damaged; the bridge has not been heard from in over 400 years. Devon returns to his village with this knowledge, but he is branded a heretic and is sentenced to be stoned to death. Garth breaks Devon out of his prison cell on the condition that Devon should leave and not come back, but instead, Devon does the one thing that he knows will reveal the truth to the rest of his neighbors: he takes Rachel through the hatch into the Ark’s infrastructure. Only Garth is brave enough to step through, and he does so armed with a crossbow, intending to bring Rachel back by force if necessary. The three of them make their way to the bridge, finding it littered with the skeletons of the Ark’s crew. And blazing through the enormous windows in the distance ahead, they see a class G star – suitable for settling the Ark’s precious cargo of life if it has habitable planets – but there’s just one problem: the Ark is locked on a collision course for that star…and no one left alive knows how to alter that course.

Season 1 Regular Cast: Keir Dullea (Devon), Gay Rowan (Rachel), Robin Ward (Garth)

Get this season on DVDwritten by Cordwainer Bird (pseudonym for Harlan Ellison) and Norman Klenman
directed by Harvey Hart
music by Score Productions Ltd.

Guest Cast: Sterling Hayden (Jeremiah), George Sperdakos (Jubal), Gillie Fenwick (Old Abraham), William Osler (The Computer), Sean Sullivan (Rachel’s Father), Aileen Seaton (Rachel’s Mother), Jim Barron (Garth’s Father), Kay Hawtrey (Garth’s Mother), Scott Fisher (Small Boy)

Notes: The concept for The Starlost was credited to series creator “Cordwainer Bird”, a well-known pseudonym for renowned SF writer Harlan Ellison, who frequently used this nom de plume to signal to his fan following that his writing had been tampered with by producers. (At one point Ellison campaigned to have his famous Star Trek script, City On The Edge Of Forever, credited to Cordwainer Bird, and claims that Gene Roddenberry threatened to smear his name in Hollywood if he did so; afterward, Ellison included contractual provisions to have his work credited to Cordwainer Bird, and he triggered that clause on The Starlost.) The producers at Canada’s CTV network obviously had the relatively-recent 2001: a space odyssey on the brain, as Keir Dullea (2001‘s David Bowman) and 2001 special effects maestro Douglas Trumbull both worked on The Starlost.

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green […]