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Krull

KrullThe Game: In the video-game adaptation of the movie – which, at the time, was expected to be the next Star Wars-type franchise – you are Colwyn, the hero of the piece. Your first job is to climb a treacherous mountain, dodging boulders, and finding the five pieces of the throwing-star-like Glaive weapon. On the second level, you get to use it against a bunch of nasty swamp creatures who are trying to kill your army. You get to do this for two levels. Then you have to break your men out of a stronghold, and then lead the fight against the invincible chief monster, all to save the princess. (Gottlieb, 1983)

Memories: Krull wasn’t a bad little game. It might take you a few quarters to get through, and that last level with the main monster was a killer. In a way, Krull is sort of like the opposite of Tron – whereas Tron is best remembered as a game and not a movie, Krull is virtually forgotten as a video game, and the movie still enjoys a small cult following.

KrullKrull’s two-joystick system was similar to the control scheme for Robotron, though with a scrolling level or two, there was just a little bit more to keep track of. The game does a fairly good job of including levels based on scenes from the movie, so at least it succeeds at being more than just a well-worn game premise with a 4 quarters!licensed name tacked on (see also: Journey).

It’s about as well remembered as the movie itself, but Krull really isn’t bad in video game form.

Krull Krull
Krull Krull

About Earl Green

I'm the webmaster and creator of theLogBook.com and its video game museum "sub-site", Phosphor Dot Fossils.
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