Into The Darkness: 4 Themes – music by Cliff Eidelman

If an unused cue from a TV or movie music score is the musical equivalent of a deleted scene, an entirely unused/rejected score (or, in this case, demos) are the musical equivalent to a completely different cut that never escapes the editing room. Such is the case with Into The Darkness: 4 Themes, a download-only EP by Cliff Eidelman, the composer who steered the Star Trek film franchise into dark, operatic territory with 1991’s Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. The four themes in question here are a four-track demo submitted by Eidelman to the producers of the then-yet-to-premiere Star Trek: Discovery, at their request.

What’s interesting about that request is that it didn’t come from Discovery creative consultant (and Star Trek VI director) Nick Meyer, but instead came from Discovery’s initial (and later dismissed) showrunner, Bryan Fuller. Reports have since emerged that Fuller had some very different ideas for launching a new Star Trek series for CBS, but had to rein some of his wilder ideas in. Eidelman’s track titles so specifically reference events in Discovery’s first two episodes that it’s clear that music was auditioned late in the process (as it usually is). “Battle Of Two Worlds” is a minor word swap away from Battle At The Binary Stars, the second hour of the series, and “Mutiny In Darkness” also references incidents in that second episode. So we can say with certainty that Eidelman’s music would have – if the composer had landed the assignment – accompanied a story very much like what actually played out on screen (with Jeff Russo’s accompaniment).

That being said, there’s something a bit less than pulse-pounding about the music presented here. It isn’t just that it’s a synth demo standing in for what was undoubtedly expected to be a full orchestra – I can cut it a break on that front knowing that it’s a demo – but it just doesn’t go anywhere. I’ve probably heard the actual Discovery theme as used on the show itself 20-25 times, and I can hum it. I’ve listened to Into The Darkness about as many times – and why not, when there’s no official Discovery soundtrack release as yet? – and I can scarcely remember Eidelman’s main recurring theme a couple of hours later. I do like his take on music involving the Klingons, as it gives a nod to the guttural, percussive brutality present in themes introduced for the Klingons down through the years by the likes of Goldsmith and Horner and Ron Jones, but that’s almost all I can remember of this EP later.

2 out of 4Scoring film and TV is a collaborative process. It’s entirely possible that even Jeff Russo didn’t hit it right out of the park on his first attempt at a theme, and that he received notes from the producers asking for either refinement or a from-the-ground-up rethink. It is, perhaps, unfair to judge Eidelman’s demos too harshly on the basis that they don’t represent a finished, polished product of that same collaborative evolution. I find the very idea of recruiting an experienced Trek composer fascinating in the extreme. But as a listening experience goes, Into The Darknes: 4 Themes shows perhaps too much restraint and not enough of the in-your-face brassiness that made so many of us fans of Star Trek’s music way back in the day.

Order this CD

  1. Into The Unknown (1:27)
  2. Battle Of Two Worlds (2:16)
  3. Mutiny In Darkness (2:13)
  4. Resolve (1:10)

Released by: Cliff Eidelman
Release date: October 20, 2017
Total running time: 7:06

The Voyager Golden Record (remastered)

The Voyager Golden RecordThis isn’t a typical music review, because it can’t be. There’s no single artist whose style can be latched onto and studied; it’s a various artists greatest hits from the breadth and depth of humanity. Perhaps it’s best treated as a historical document than a collection of music.

In 1977, with mere weeks to go before the launch of Voyager 2 (the first Voyager spacecraft to leave Earth), Carl Sagan, Jon Lomberg, Ann Druyan, Frank Drake, Linda Salzman, and Timothy Ferris won last-minute approval to assemble a kind of “time capsule” to attach to each Voyager. Copyright clearances had to be obtained, greetings had to be recorded, the whole thing had to be edited, mastered and pressed onto gold-plated copper records, to be encased in aluminum covers attached to the spacecraft…all in a matter of weeks. Photographs are also encoded onto the records, and those too had to be selected, annotated, and cleared for copyright. It was really something of a shotgun wedding as far as putting a record together goes – and at numerous stages of its development, there were high-ranking NASA officials who made it clear that, as far as they were concerned, Sagan’s greatest hits record could stay on Earth with him. The Golden Record was a bear to put together, and it was a constant struggle to keep it on the flight manifest.

The rapid ramp-up from idea to execution, as well as the state of the art in 1977, means that there’s some unavoidable tape hiss from the original recording media. Ozma Records has done a marvelous job of cleaning everything up as far as sound quality, but sometimes you can’t overcome the limitations of the original medium. The track list is exactly as it was on the LP attached to the Voyager spacecraft (which, as a result of being mastered at a lower speed than 33 1/3, could hold more information).

If you spring for the physical package of either vinyl records or CDs, a book is included with the complete selection of photos included on the original records, as well as essays and memoirs from those involved with the Golden Record who are still with us. I backed the initial Kickstarter for the project, but only up to the digital download level due to budgetary concerns on my end; I’m seriously considering circling back around and buying the Golden Record compilation a second time just for the book.

If there’s a feeling one gets from listening to this message-in-a-bottle thrown through the outer solar system and right through the heliosphere, it’s one of feeling humbled. The wide variety of life and experiences on Earth is mind boggling, and some of the sequencing is canny – the launch of a Saturn V rocket followed by the cries of a human baby. We’re still in our infancy, pushing our way into the universe by brute force, and still trying to figure out how we can survive a journey to another planet within our solar system. The Voyagers are going further – one of the Golden Records has already left the solar system, never to return – bearing a snapshot of our hopes and dreams circa the summer of 1977.

And in the troubled summer of 2017, maybe we need to revisit those hopes and dreams too.

This title is not being given a rating due to its unique nature.

Order this CD

  1. Greetings from the Secretary General of the United Nations – Kurt Waldheim (0:43)
  2. Greetings in 55 languages (3:46)
  3. United Nations greetings / Whalesong (4:04)
  4. The Sounds of Earth (12:18)
    • Music of the Spheres by Laurie Spiegel
    • Volcanoes
    • Earthquake
    • Thunder
    • Mud Pots
    • Wind
    • Rain
    • Surf
    • Crickets
    • Frogs
    • Birds
    • Hyena
    • Elephant
    • Chimpanzee
    • Wild Dog
    • Footsteps
    • Heartbeat
    • Laughter
    • Fire
    • Speech
    • The First Tools
    • Tame Dog
    • Herding Sheep
    • Blacksmith
    • Sawing
    • Tractor
    • Riveter
    • Morse Code
    • Ships
    • Horse and Cart
    • Train
    • Tractor
    • Bus
    • Auto
    • F-111 Flyby
    • Saturn 5 Lift-off
    • Kiss
    • Mother and Child
    • Life Signs
    • Pulsar

  5. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F Major, BWV 1047: I. Allegro – Munich Bach Orchestra/Karl Richter (4:44)
  6. Ketawang: Puspåwårnå (Kinds of Flowers) – Pura Paku Alaman Palace Orchestra/K.R.T. Wasitodipuro (4:47)
  7. Cengunmé – Mahi musicians of Benin (2:11)
  8. Alima Song – Mbuti of the Ituri Rainforest (1:01)
  9. Barnumbirr (Morning Star) and Moikoi Song – Tom Djawa, Mudpo, and Waliparu (1:29)
  10. El Cascabel (Lorenzo Barcelata) – Antonio Maciel and Los Aguilillas with Mariachi México de Pepe Villa/Rafael Carrión (3:20)
  11. Johnny B. Goode – Chuck Berry (2:41)
  12. Mariuamang? – Pranis Pandang and Kumbui of the Nyaura Clan (1:25)
  13. Sokaku-Reibo (Depicting the Cranes in Their Nest) – Goro Yamaguchi (5:04)
  14. Bach: Partita for Violin Solo No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1006: III. Gavotte en Rondeau – Arthur Grumiaux (2:58)
  15. Mozart: The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflöte), K. 620, Act II: Hell’s Vengeance Boils in My Heart – Bavarian State Opera Orchestra and Chorus/Wolfgang Sawallisch (3:00)
  16. Chakrulo – Georgian State Merited Ensemble of Folk Song and Dance/Anzor Kavsadze (2:21)
  17. Roncadoras and Drums – Musicians from Ancash (0:55)
  18. Melancholy Blues – Louis Armstrong and His Hot Seven (3:06)
  19. Mu?am – Kamil Jalilov (2:35)
  20. Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring (Le Sacre du Printemps), Part II—The Sacrifice: VI. Sacrificial Dance (The Chosen One) – Columbia Symphony Orchestra/Igor Stravinsky (4:38)
  21. Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II: Prelude & Fugue No. 1 in C Major, BWV 870 – Glenn Gould (4:51)
  22. Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Opus 67: I. Allegro Con Brio – Philharmonia Orchestra/Otto Klemperer (4:38)
  23. Izlel e Delyu Haydutin – Valya Balkanska (5:04)
  24. Navajo Night Chant, Yeibichai Dance (Ambrose Roan Horse, Chester Roan, and Tom Roan (1:01)
  25. Anthony Holborne: The Fairie Round – Early Music Consort of London/David Munrow (1:19)
  26. Naranaratana Kookokoo (The Cry of the Megapode Bird) – Maniasinimae and Taumaetarau Chieftain Tribe of Oloha and Palasu’u Village Community (1:15)
  27. Wedding Song – Young girl of Huancavelica (0:42)
  28. Liu Shui (Flowing Streams) – Guan Pinghu (7:36)
  29. Bhairavi: Jaat Kahan Ho – Kesarbai Kerkar (3:34)
  30. Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground – Blind Willie Johnson (3:32)
  31. Beethoven:String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Opus 130: V. Cavatina – Budapest String Quartet (6:41)

Released by: Ozma Records
Release date: 2017
Total running time: 1:51:04

The Woman Astronaut – music by Penka Kouvena

The Woman AstronautFrom the mind of big-league orchestrator/arranger Penka Kouvena, whose work can be heard in the Gears Of War game series and the soundtracks of such movies as Ender’s Game, Angels And Demons, and Elysium, The Woman Astronaut is a very modern soundtrack without a movie. With no visuals to adhere to and no game whose moods must be matched, it’s pure musical expression, and rather autobiographical at that (her liner notes state that this is really her story: there are fewer female composers actively working in Hollywood than there have been female astronauts in orbit).

By weaving her music around the framework of the ambitions, struggles and triumphs of a fictional female astronaut, there’s a “space” sound that makes this fitting accompaniment to that journey. And it’s awesome, widescreen stuff – there are some big-name soloists and a full orchestra, thanks to a Kickstarter campaign backed by fans, Twitter followers, and even fellow composers, among them Lolita Ritmanis (Batman: The 4 out of 4Animated Series). Any movie would do well to have such a soundtrack, and something tells me we’ll be seeing Kounevic credited as a composer, not just an orchestrator, in the future. So here’s an idea: let’s find a project worthy of Penka Kouvena’s talents and her message. Is that Honor Harrington movie adaptation still a go? Because here’s a completed soundtrack practically waiting for the movie to happen.

Order this CD

  1. Earth (4:51)
  2. Starry Way (3:$8)
  3. The Forest (2:45)
  4. Land Of Burning Fields (2:10)
  5. Looking Up (2:36)
  6. Training (3:53)
  7. Broken (1:57)
  8. Taking Flight (5:12)
  9. Alarm And Rescue (2:18)
  10. In Space (4:06)
  11. Insomnia (3:43)
  12. Siren (3:20)
  13. Goodbyes In Zero Gravity (3:12)
  14. Solar Flare (4:17)

Released by: Varese Sarabande
Release date: July 10, 2015
Total running time: 48:08

Doctor Who: The Rapture – music by Jim Mortimore

Doctor Who: The RaptureIn 2002, Big Finish Productions released The Rapture, a Doctor Who audio play which had the distinction of being the first professionally-published work by one Joe Lidster (who went on to do more for Big Finish before being snatched up by the BBC itself), and of being one of the most controversial things the company had produced up to that point. Plucking the seventh Doctor and Ace out of tea time TV and dropping them into a storyline at an all-week rave complete with sex and drugs was too much for some fans’ tender sensibilities. And The Rapture had some awesome music – real club music, not some soundtrack-composer-for-hire’s second-hand impression of real EDM. Composer Jim Mortimore, in addition to having written Doctor Who novels and audio stories in the past, had also enjoyed a second career, playing live music at raves through much of the 1990s. To say that The Rapture‘s music is merely authentic is probably underselling it. It’s the real deal.

In 2012, via Bandcamp, Mortimore released three CDs’ worth of music from an audio story (whose narrative running time was only enough to take up two CDs). Drawing from his ’90s recordings as well as concocting an entire CD worth of new music, and bringing collaborators Jane Elphinstone and Simon Robinson on board, Mortimore presented Big Finish with a series of pieces that would be excerpted as needed for The Rapture, with some music heard only briefly in the background mix at the story’s titular nightclub and with other pieces – the specially composed ones – more prominently placed in the foreground. A few Rapture tracks had previously been presented on a Big Finish soundtrack CD in the past, but were savagely edited down to two and three minute running lengths: most of the tracks in their original form run close to eight minutes long, and are better for it, with the melodies developing a bit more naturally. Tracks such as “Over Me” show much deeper layers and arrangements than the edited-down versions hinted at.

The “A Side” covers all of the music composed expressly for The Rapture, while the “B Side” tracks are the full-length tracks Mortimore presented from his ’90s work for inclusion in the background of several scenes. (Again, the average length is about eight minutes; most of the excerpts of these pieces in the finished audio play could be measured in seconds or maybe as many as a couple of minutes.) The “E Side” consists of downtempo tracks, one of them quite lengthy; whether the “E” is for “epic”, “ecstasy”, or “etheral” is up for you to decide.

4 out of 4Many times over the years I’ve dragged out that Big Finish soundtrack and its woefully truncated soundtrack for The Rapture because it’s ridiculously good music by which to write. Color me “E” for “elated” that the full tracks – and more of them – are now available. And gloriously, “Doctored Who” gives us the full-length rave remix of Delia Derbyshire’s Doctor Who theme. Whether or not the story of The Rapture is worth the listening time is something that’s still hotly debated in Doctor Who fan circles, but its soundtrack is undoubtedly worth the listening time for audiences far beyond Doctor Who fandom.

Order

    “Side A”

  1. Over Me (7:02)
  2. On The Beach (6:01)
  3. Rebirth (7:46)
  4. Brook Of Eden (8:07)
  5. Freestyle (6:34)
  6. Sorted (6:31)
  7. Jude’s Law (9:09)
  8. Pink Pulloff (4:52)
  9. Music Of The Spheres (6:10)
  10. Gloves Off (3:40)
  11. Doctored Who (2:10)
  12. “Side B”

  13. Kanhra (8:18)
  14. Udu (8:08)
  15. Uracas (8:16)
  16. Xanthulu (7:17)
  17. Mahser Dagi (8:07)
  18. “Side E”

  19. Sven’s Wrath (3:39)
  20. Radio Beach (5:32)
  21. Ice Floes At Twilight (35:20)
  22. Phases Of The Moon (3:58)

Released by: Jim Mortimore via BandCamp
Release date: October 28, 2012
Total running time: 2:36:37

Doctor Who: Music From The Excelis Audio Adventures

Music From The Excelis Audio AdventuresOnce upon a time, as hard as it is to imagine from the vantage point of 2011, Doctor Who wasn’t on TV, existing only as a steadily growing series of audio plays, a steadily waning range of original novels, and a steady stream of merchandise related to a TV show that wasn’t there anymore. In 2002, to offset the fact that the regular monthly audio stories would follow the eighth Doctor for half of that year, Big Finish released a quartet of additional stories, chronicling previous Doctors’ sequential encounters with an immortal being named Grayvorn. This kept fans of the earlier Doctors happy, and was an interesting early experiment in story arc plotting for Big Finish.

It also gave resident composer David Darlington a shot at creating a quartet of thematically linked music scores to go with the quartet of linked stories. Each story has overlapping musical ideas, as well as a unique tone suiting the ever-evolving setting of the planet Artaris, from its zombie-infested bronze age, to a Renaissance-like era, to a dystopian dictatorship. A fourth story, featuring not the Doctor but the reckless Time Lady Iris Wildthyme (a character introduced in the BBC’s line of novels), went even further back in time. The material common to all of the scores is a mesmerizing, repeating guitar riff which – uncommonly for synth-dominated early Big Finish – actually sounds like it was played on a guitar. If you can recall the hypnotic quality of the Alan Parsons Project instrumental “Sirius”, it’s sort of like that.

Strangely, a maddening series of equally repetitive drum loops represents the middle ages for the music from Excelis Dawns. This is the least enjoyable element of this series of soundtracks. I’m not completely opposed to the apparent anachronism, but the repetition is maddening – one particular drum loop spans two tracks and just doesn’t let up. By the time the Excelis Dawns music gets interesting, it’s like the drum loop has delivered a dose of a potent mental anesthetic – my ears were desensitized to the more interesting elements.

Excelis Rising continues the guitar riff and adds echoing church bells befitting the story’s reason-vs.-superstition storyline. This story’s soundtrack also includes some attempts to emulate the small acoustic ensemble sound of the Dudley Simpson era of Doctor Who music; it doesn’t quite hit the mark, but the contrast against the other scores on this CD is welcome.

Excelis Decays opens up with a musical suite featuring dialogue from the story in question. I’m not a big fan of that practice, but here it has two interesting twists: Excelis Decays was savagely edited down at the last minute to get it to fit on the single CD that Big Finish had scheduled for it, and the track in question (“There’s More To This Than You Know”) consists largely of dialogue that was edited out of the episode. Slightly less welcome is that the dialogue has been processed to include a layer of dialogue which is slightly auto-tuned to match up with the background music. It’s mixed down behind the spoken version of that dialogue, but it’s a curious – and ultimately distracting – stylistic choice.

The rest of Excelis Decays is much more interesting listening, twisting the church bells of Excelis Rising into dissonant industrial percussion. The composer’s liner notes mention a fixation on Vangelis’ Blade Runner score, and that influence is very evident. The last score, to the Doctor-less Plague Herds Of Excelis, combines elements of all of the previous approaches, with that hypnotic guitar riff still prominent.

3 out of 4Excelis seemed like a bold experiment back in the heady early days of Big Finish-produced Doctor Who (these days, every Doctor gets a thematically-linked three-story “season” every year), and the music helped to cement the connections between the four chapters of this mini-epic in style. I might’ve gone lighter on the drum loops if it was up to me, but overall it’s one of the more cohesive Big Finish music soundtracks.

Order this CD

    Excelis Dawns

  1. Excelis (1:39)
  2. The Mountain of Adventure (6:26)
  3. Dawn of the Dead… (2:36)
  4. …But The Hills Are Alive (1:20)
  5. Welcome To The Jungle (2:02)
  6. A Handbag (1:34)
  7. Vanishing Point (1:46)

    Excelis Rising

  8. The Sacred Art Of Stealing (2:22)
  9. Live Forever (1:42)
  10. Ouija Board, Ouija Board (2:54)
  11. Burn Off Into The Distance (4:40)
  12. Hosanna In Excelis Deo (1:51)
  13. Made of Stone (2:49)

    Excelis Decays

  14. There’s More To This Than You Know (3:28)
  15. Oppression (1:54)
  16. Electric Urban Youth (3:10)
  17. Lake Of Fire (3:20)
  18. Propoganda (2:30)
  19. Time to Die (2:12)
  20. Two Hearts Under the Skyscrapers (3:35)
  21. Let the Nuclear Wind Blow Away Our Sins (0:58)

    Bernice Summerfield And the Plague Herds Of Excelis

  22. Panic On The Streets (2:54)
  23. I’m Under A Cow (1:21)
  24. Two Tortured Souls (3:19)
  25. When the Screams Subside (3:43)
  26. Something Savage and Pure (1:05)
  27. But Now the Weakness Comes (2:19)
  28. The Secret (2:03)
  29. Slight Return (1:19)

Released by: Big Finish Productions
Release date: 2002
Total running time: 72:51

E.S. Posthumus – Makara

With custom-made movie trailer music gaining wider acceptance as listening material away from the big screen, E.S. Posthumus is among a handful of trailer music producers who find that their music is suitable for general audiences, and is actually in demand. Their third album, Makara, highlights the big, boisterous orchestral sound that seems to be de rigeur for previews of upcoming attractions. The problem is that Makara doesn’t deviate from that style much from track to track, so it can be an exhausting album to listen to from top to tail.

Where the previous album was skewed heavily toward gentler, less action-oriented music, Makara swings the pendulum hard in the other direction. Highlights include “Kalki”, “Ushas”, “Arise” and “Krosah”, but generally speaking, the action trailer music on Makara isn’t up to the level of similar material on Unearthed; it’s hard to put a finger on, but just as the gentle-and-sentimental material on Cartographer varied between listenable and just plain maudlin, Makara veers between enjoyably bombastic and “just too much” with a handful of quieter tracks (including a strangely flat-but-trying-so-hard-to-be-epic take on “Moonlight Sonata”).
2 out of 4
Still, if you’re a fan of trailer music, you know what you’re getting into, and if what you want to get into sounds like the musical accompaniment to a preview that’s thick with gunfire and explosions, Makara won’t let you down.

Order this CD

  1. Kalki (3:05)
  2. Varuna (4:17)
  3. Unstoppable (3:04)
  4. Durga (3:41)
  5. Manju (4:18)
  6. Kuvera (4:05)
  7. Ushas (3:55)
  8. Lavanya (3:57)
  9. Vishnu (3:38)
  10. Indra (4:18)
  11. Arise (4:12)
  12. Saint Matthew Passion (3:38)
  13. Discuss it!Krosah (4:50)
  14. Anumati (3:19)
  15. Moonlight Sonata (5:30)

Released by: Wigshop Records
Release date: 2010
Total running time: 59:47

Raymond Scott – Manhattan Research, Inc.

Manhattan Research, Inc.Perhaps unfairly best known for having his music repurposed into the backing tracks for classic Warner Bros. cartoons, the late Raymond Scott has another claim to fame that often gets overlooked – he was one of the true pioneers of electronic music in America. In this area, Scott was a true renaissance man: not only did he pioneer the sound, but he built his own instruments and early devices that presaged sequencers, and he even did some of the first work on multi-track recording, at roughly the same time that Les Paul was experimenting with similar ideas. In the 1950s and 1960s (at roughly the same time as the ascendancy of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop), Scott was carving out his own path in an entire new genre of music.

Not only that, but Scott was trying his hardest to make his experiments pay for themselves: he marketed his unusual new sounds as music beds and jingles for commercials, with some success. The two-disc Manhattan Research, Inc. collection chronicles and archives that material, with a selection of Scott’s finished spots (both with and without announcers/singers) as well as demos and experiments that never made it to radio. The commercials range from obscurely local/regional campaigns (Baltimore Gas & Electric Company) to major national campaigns (IBM, Bufferin, Vicks, General Motors and a Sprite radio campaign that remains famous enough that it’s now become an ironic cover song). In a way, Scott achieved his aim by getting a new style of music into the ears of millions of listeners – but until now, not with any recognition.

While the commercials are a nostalgia trip that goes back even before the writer of this review was born, some of the purely instrumental pieces are startlingly ahead of their time: the “Night and Day” track on the first disc could’ve caught on in the 1980s had it been revived then. “Take Me To Your Violin Teacher” could easily be mistaken for modern chiptunes performed with 1980s video game hardware… and yet it was recorded in 1969. “Ripples (Montage)” anticipates abstract-but-tuneful electronic film scoring. “Cindy Electronium” sounds like late ’80s/early ’90s video game music.

There are a few throwbacks as well; Scott tries out completely electronic renditions of his existing compositions including “The Toy Trumpet” (which becomes almost unrecognizable) and “Twilight In Turkey”, both of which featured in their original, jazzier forms on Reckless Nights & Turkish Twilights. Some of his electronic music beds are also quite obviously very close cousins of the music from his Soothing Sounds For Baby albums. There’s also one very interesting guest star on a few tracks: the voice of none other than Jim Henson graces some tracks recorded in 1969, including “Limbo: The Organized Mind”, a free-form ramble set to Scott’s electronic sounds, and a couple of Bufferin commercials which seem to have sprung from “Limbo” both conceptually and musically.

A lot of this information, incidentally, is included in a book that clocks in at around 140 pages and covers Scott’s entire life and career, not just the material on these two CDs, in a wealth of detail.

3 out of 4Raymond Scott is still overdue for a reassessment of one of the electronic music pioneers in the United States, to say nothing of being a composer whose works influenced generations of children (by way of Warner Bros. cartoons). Manhattan Research, Inc. really isn’t a “general audience” listening experience, but it’s an invaluable archive for anyone interested in how electronic music gained a foothold in our national consciousness: in little snippets, 30 or so seconds at a time, behind commercial announcers and jingle singers.

Order this CD

    Disc One

  1. Manhattan Research, Inc. Copyright (0:11)
  2. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. (Instrumental, Take 4) (1:14)
  3. Bendix 1: The Tomorrow People (1:06)
  4. Lightworks (1:52)
  5. The Bass-line Generator (3:10)
  6. Don’t Beat Your Wife Every Night! (1:44)
  7. B.C. 1675 (Gillette Conga Drum Jingle) (3:16)
  8. Vim (0:59)
  9. Auto-Lite: Sta-Ful (Instrumental) (0:47)
  10. Sprite: Melonball Bounce (Instrumental) (1963)
  11. Sprite: Melonball Bounce (1963)
  12. Wheels That Go (0:50)
  13. Limbo: The Organized Mind (4:33)
  14. Portofino 1 (2:13)
  15. County Fair (1:01)
  16. Lady Gaylord (1:02)
  17. Good Air (Take 7) (0:38)
  18. IBM MT/ST: The Paperwork Explosion (4:31)
  19. Domino (0:33)
  20. Super Cheer (0:34)
  21. Cheer: Revision 3 (New Backgrounds) (0:39)
  22. Twilight in Turkey (1:32)
  23. Raymond Scott Quote / Vicks: Medicated Cough Drops (1:34)
  24. Vicks: Formula 44 (0:46)
  25. Auto-Lite: Spark Plugs (1:00)
  26. Nescafe (1:06)
  27. Awake (0:35)
  28. Backwards Overload (6:04)
  29. Bufferin: Memories (Original) (0:59)
  30. Bandito the Bongo Artist (1:30)
  31. Night and Day (Cole Porter) (1:45)
  32. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. (“395”) (1:07)
  33. K2r (0:19)
  34. IBM Probe (1:56)
  35. GMGM 1A (1:49)
  36. The Rhythm Modulator (3:37)
    Disc Two

  1. Ohio Plus (0:17)
  2. In the Hall of the Mountain Queen (0:49)
  3. General Motors: Futurama (1:04)
  4. Portofino 2 (2:14)
  5. The Wild Piece (a.k.a. String Piece) (4:07)
  6. Take Me to Your Violin Teacher (1:40)
  7. Ripples (Original Soundtrack) (0:59)
  8. Cyclic Bit (1:04)
  9. Ripples (Montage) (4:06)
  10. The Wing Thing (1:00)
  11. County Fair (Instrumental) (1:00)
  12. Cindy Electronium (1:59)
  13. Don’t Beat Your Wife Every Night! (Instrumental) (1:45)
  14. Hostess: Twinkies (0:32)
  15. Hostess: Twinkies (Instrumental) (0:32)
  16. Ohio Bell: Thermo Fax (0:24)
  17. Pygmy Taxi Corporation (7:11)
  18. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. (Announce Copy, Take 1) (0:29)
  19. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. (0:44)
  20. Lightworks (Slow) (1:40)
  21. The Paperwork Explosion (Instrumental) (3:30)
  22. Auto-Lite: Ford Family (1:03)
  23. Auto-Lite: Ford Family (Instrumental) (0:54)
  24. Raymond Scott Quote / Auto-Lite: Wheels (1:50)
  25. Bufferin: Memories (Demo) (0:44)
  26. Space Mystery (Montage) (5:11)
  27. The Toy Trumpet (2:15)
  28. Backwards Beeps (1:05)
  29. Raymond Scott Quote / Auto-Lite: Sta-Ful (1:36)
  30. Lightworks (Instrumental) (1:29)
  31. When Will It End? (3:14)
  32. Bendix 2: The Tomorrow People (1963)
  33. Electronic Audio Logos, Inc. (5:23)

Released by: Basta
Release date: 2000
Disc one total running time: 58:48
Disc two total running time: 63:11