Ladyhawke (newly expanded edition)

Ladyhawke (newly expanded edition)Either an awkward or awesome fit for its movie, depending upon whom one asks, 1984’s Ladyhawke veered away from the usual (indeed, almost stereotypical) Korngold-inspired heraldry expected of swords-and-sorcery films and, courtesy of composer Andrew Powell and his producer/collaborator Alan Parsons (of Alan Parsons Project fame), dared to score a period piece with synthesizers and rock music.

The result is practically a lost Project album in style and execution, and not a bad one at that. La-La Land Records expands the Ladyhawke score (last issued in the 1990s by GNP Crescendo) to two discs, including every note of the score, plus goodies such as demos, unused cues, and bite-sized edits of the movie’s music intended for radio advertising. If you already like the score, this release will delight you: there’s more where it came from, including fascinating alternate cues. If you didn’t like the score to begin with, steer clear: nothing here is likely to change your mind about it unless you’re prepared to go in with an open mind and open ears.

3 out of 4The packaging is a huge improvement on the almost-generic presentation of the 1990s release, with liner notes including interviews with Powell, Parsons, and director Richard Donner. This 2-CD set balances out the synth-heavy Crescendo single CD release by revealing that Powell prepared as much “traditional” material as he did anachronistic material; it’s still a fun listen.

Order this CD

    Disc One

  1. Main Title (03:02)
  2. Phillipe’s Escape From Dungeon (01:51)
  3. Phillipe’s Escape Through Sewer (01:43)
  4. The Search For Philippe (03:27)
  5. Navarre At Sunset (00:22)
  6. Tavern Fight (Philippe)
  7. (02:10)

  8. Tavern Fight (Navarre)
  9. (02:43)

  10. Navarre’s Saddlebag (00:37)
  11. Navarre Dreams Of Isabeau (00:56)
  12. Pitou’s Woods (04:07)
  13. Marquet’s Return To Aquila Part 1 (01:01)
  14. Philippe Describes Isabeau (01:14)
  15. Marquet’s Return To Aqula Part 2 (01:17)
  16. Bishop’s Garden (00:45)
  17. Navarre Has Returned (00:27)
  18. Monk’s Chant In Bishop’s Garden (01:58)
  19. Isabeau Chases A Rabbit (00:25)
  20. Navarre’s Sunset / Philippe’s Capture (00:36)
  21. Navarre Is Ambushed / Hawk Injured (04:55)
  22. Philippe And Imperius Enter Abbey (01:18)
  23. Philippe Discovers Isabeau’s Secret (01:28)
  24. Imperius Removes Arrow From Isabeau (01:37)
  25. The Bishop Interviews Cezar (01:33)
  26. “You Must Save This Hawk” (01:07)
  27. Chase Up The Turret / Isabeau’s Fall Part 2 (02:49)
  28. Isabeau’s Transformation (00:39)
  29. Isabeau Flies Free (01:14)
  30. Navarre And Imperius (00:42)
  31. Navarre And Philippe Leave The Abbey (01:45)
  32. Wedding Party (01:45)
  33. Navarre’s Transformation (00:44)
  34. Wedding Dance (02:38)
  35. Cezar’s Woods (05:32)
  36. “She Was Sad At First” (02:09)
  37. Navarre Rides To Aquila (01:40)
  38. Philippe And Imperius (00:28)
  39. Wolf Trapped In Ice Pool (02:38)
  40. Navarre And Isabeau’s Dual Transformation (03:24)
    Disc Two

  1. Navarre Sees Phillipe’s Wounds (00:44)
  2. Return to Aquila (02:44)
  3. Phillipe’s Return Through Sewer (01:03)
  4. Bishop’s Procession Chant 1 (01:32)
  5. Bishop’s Procession Chant 2 (01:48)
  6. The Service Begins (Part 1) (00:50)
  7. Navarre’s Instruction to Kill Isabeau (00:50)
  8. The Service Begins (Part 2) (00:40)
  9. Navarre Enters the Cathedral (01:36)
  10. Navarre and Marquet Cathedral Fight (04:27)
  11. Marquet’s Death (02:02)
  12. Isabeau Appears (00:50)
  13. Bishop’s Death (02:30)
  14. The Final Reunion / End Titles (06:07)
  15. Chase Up the Turret / Isabeau’s Fall Part 1 (00:53)
  16. Chase / Fall / Transformation (02:10)
  17. Phillipe Discovers Isabeau’s Secret (01:44)
  18. Imperius Removes Arrow From Isabeau (01:33)
  19. Navarre and Phillipe Leave the Abbey (01:45)
  20. Navarre’s Transformation (00:46)
  21. Wolf Trapped in Ice Pool (02:36)
  22. Phillipe’s Jewel (00:51)
  23. Ent Titles (05:00)
  24. Spot 01 Radio Bed A – 30′ (00:35)
  25. Spot 02 Radio Bed A – 30′ (00:35)
  26. Spot 03 Radio Bed B – 30′ (01:05)
  27. Spot 04 Radio Bed C – 30′ (00:56)
  28. Spot 05 Radio Bed A – 60′ (01:03)
  29. Spot 06 Radio Bed B – 60′ (01:09)
  30. Spot 07 Radio Bed C – 75′ (01:16)
  31. Spot 08 Radio Bed A – 90′ (01:31)
  32. Spot 10 Radio Bed B – 90′ (01:38)
  33. Spot 09 Radio Bed A – Full (03:32)
  34. Ladyhawke Theme (Single) (03:37)

Released by: La-La Land Records
Release date: February 10, 2015
Disc One total running time: 1:08:23
Disc One total running time: 1:01:38

Chris Hadfield – Space Sessions: Songs From A Tin Can

Space Sessions: Songs From A Tin CanSpace Sessions: Songs From A Tin Can is Canadian astronaut (and former International Space Station commander) Chris Hadfield’s long-promised album of songs he recorded, at least in part, while in space. Holed up in his tiny sleeping cubicle on the station after “work hours”, and trying to brace an acoustic guitar against his own body so it could actually be played, Hadfield used an iPad to generate a click track by which to keep tempo, and to record his guitar and vocal parts as separate tracks. (His sleeping area was the quietest place aboard the ISS; air handling and life support systems created too much noise anywhere else. Turns out that the 1980s/90s Star Trek series, with their constant “air conditioning” roar in the background, weren’t far off the mark.)

Aside from the obligatory appearance of his mesmerizing YouTube favorite cover of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” as a bonus track, everything on Space Sessions is written by Hadfield himself in a folk-country style. A great many of the songs are, somewhat predictably, space-themed, though it’s worth noting that some of them were written while in orbit, while others were penned on the ground before liftoff. But even with the constant subtext of space in the background, there’s everything from a musical prayer for the reliability of the technology keeping space explorers alive (“Big Smoke”) to a number about getting accustomed to zero-G disorientation (“Feet Up”) to a story song about a woman giving birth while her husband is in space (“Caroline”).

3 out of 4All of it is performed with a strong singer/songwriter sensibility (I think John Denver would have approved of both the music and the venue in which it was made). Only a couple of tracks suffer from having been recorded in a sleeping cubicle on a real orbiting space station, but this can probably be forgiven for the following reason: recorded on a real orbiting space station. In all seriousness, however, Hadfield’s got the goods to command a space station or belt out a tune. This stuff would be worth a listen even if it was completely earthbound.

Order this CD

  1. Big Smoke (3:37)
  2. Beyond The Terra (4:05)
  3. Feet Up (2:57)
  4. I Wonder If She (4:19)
  5. Caroline (4:12)
  6. Jewel In The Night (3:08)
  7. Daughter Of My Sins (2:26)
  8. Window Of My Mind (3:15)
  9. Space Lullaby (3:25)
  10. Farm Auction (3:08)
  11. Ride That Lightning (3:20)
  12. Space Oddity (5:19)

Released by: Warner Music Canada
Release date: October 9, 2015
Total running time: 43:11

Rob Dougan – The 22nd Sunday In Ordinary Time Sessions

The 22nd Sunday In Ordinary Time SessionsIf you’re a fan of the music from The Matrix trilogy, you’re probably a fan of Rob Dougan without realizing it: the first movie’s music for the woman in the red dress, The Matrix Reloaded‘s scenery-destroying all-out melee in a museum-like space – basically, where you heard almost James-Bond-cool strings overlaid with a trip-hop techno beat, that was Rob Dougan, an Australian DJ whose work had gained a cult following nearly a decade before The Matrix hit theaters.

But Dougan has always had more artsy ambitions: sampled strings aren’t good enough for him. That’s the theory behind this EP, which continues his neo-classical (no Matrix pun intended) fusion experiments. The 22nd Sunday In Ordinary Time Sessions see Dougan’s compositions played by a real orchestra: “Frescobaldi’s Toccata” is stately, “Vale (Ave Atque Vale)” and “A Drawing-Down of Blinds-Valedico” are sedate, while the more driving “The Return” is presented both with and without a drum overlay. There are no lead vocals on any of the songs; this is a strictly instrumental (and occasionally choral) experience.

4 out of 4This is the first we’ve heard of Dougan since his knockout 2004 solo album Furious Angels, and hopefully it isn’t the last – indeed, he’s working on a full album even as his fans listen to The 22nd Sunday In Ordinary Time Sessions and ponder how much he’s been missed. This is classy, retro-cinematic cool at its finest.

Order this CD

    Frescobaldi’s Toccata (Orchestral Session) (4:38)
    Vale (Ave Atque Vale) (Orchestral Session) (4:46)
    The Return (Orchestral Session) (5:02)
    A Drawing-Down of Blinds-Valedico (Orchestral Session) (6:24)
    The Return (Orchestral Session) (Alternative Mix) (5:00)

Released by: robdougan.com
Release date: May 9, 2015
Total running time: 25:50