The Xena Scrolls

Xena: Warrior PrincessIn 1940’s Macedonia, Dr. Janice Covington, an archeologist, is looking for the Xena Scrolls. After finding a telegram that Dr. Covington sent to her father, Melinda Pappas arrives at her dig to help with the translation of the scrolls. A rival archeologist, Dr. John Smythe, sends some men to their camp to take anything that Janice and her crew have found. But she runs them off before they get the chance. A Lieutenant Jacques from French Intelligence is also snooping around. He tells Covington that he was sent to help her. Smythe appears at the camp with a tablet that could be the key to opening up the tomb that Janice has uncovered. He forces Janice to open it at gunpoint. As they enter the tomb, the stairwell colapses. Janice, Mel, and Jacques are seperated from Smythe and his men. Mel translates the writing that is on the walls as saying that they are in the tomb of Ares. The trio soon discover the hidden scrolls, and with them is half of Xena’s chakram. Janice tries to remove it from the stone that it is imbedded in but is unsuccessful. Mel, however, easily extracts the broken weapon. Once it’s in her hand, it seems to pull Mel toward something. She encounters Smythe and his men. Smythe has found the other half of the chakram.

Order the DVDsteleplay by Adam Armus and Nora Kay Foster
story by Robert Sidney Mellette
directed by Charlie Haskell
music by Joseph LoDuca

Cast: Lucy Lawless (Melinda “Mel” Pappas), Renee O’Connor (Dr. Janice Covington), Ted Raimi (Jacques/Jack Klieman/Joxer), Ted Raimi (Ted), Kevin Smith (Ares), Mark Ferguson (John Smythe), Ajay Vasisht (Nikos), Robert Tapert (Robert Tapert), Reza Nijad (Local), Campbell Rocsselle (Thug #1)

LogBook entry by Mary Terrell

Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed

  • The shows, movies and other stories covered here, and all related characters and placenames, are the property of the originators of the respective intellectual properties. This site is not intended to infringe upon the rightsholders' copyright in any way. theLogBook.com makes no attempt - in using the names described herein - to supercede the copyrights of the rightsholders, nor is any of this information officially sanctioned, licensed, or endorsed by the shows' creators, writers or producers.