The Deception

Planet Of The ApesAfter narrowly escaping an unusually savage attack on the home of a fellow human who is helping them hide, Virdon and Burke follow Galen along a stretch of shoreline until their meet another ape, Fauna, who is blind. But even here, they must be careful: Fauna’s father was recently killed, and her uncle, Sestus, insists that humans were the killers. Virdon and Burke carefully conceal their identities, but just from talking to him, Fauna finds herself falling in love with Burke. In the meantime, Galen goes undercover to infiltrate a group called the Dragoons, who devote themselves to ridding their area of humans – by any and all means. Sestus is one of them, and Galen learns that even the local branch of General Urko’s forces do not approve of the Dragoons’ extreme methods. Worse yet, as part of his initiation, Galen is expected kill humans himself.

Order the DVDsteleplay by Anthony Lawrence and Ken Spears & Joe Ruby
story by Anthony Lawrence
directed by Don McDougall
music by Earle Hagen

Guest Cast: Jane Actman (Fauna), Pat Renella (Zon), John Milford (Sestus), Hal Baylor (Jasko), Baynes Barron (Perdix)

Notes: The writing/producing team of Joe Ruby and Ken Spears – also story consultant for the Planet Of The Apes TV series as a whole – is the same Ruby & Spears team behind countless children’s series and specials. For Sid & Marty Krofft, the Ruby/Spears team wrote many episodes of Wonderbug and Electra Woman & Dyna Girl, and later they wrote and produced animated series such as Thundarr the Barbarian, Mr. T, Alvin & The Chipmunks, and even animated shows based on video games such as Dragon’s Lair and Donkey Kong. Joe Ruby had been a music editor on such genre series as Time Tunnel and Lost In Space. The Deception is actually a very-thinly-veiled allegorical condemnation of the methodology and philosophy of the Ku Klux Klan.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Horse Race

Planet Of The ApesDuring a visit with the ape prefect of an outlying town, General Urko is irked when his rider loses in a seemingly friendly horse race – one which Urko was clearly expecting his rider to win (so he could win the bet). But Urko doesn’t know that the local prefect has two new humans working in his stables: Virdon and Burke. When Galen is stung by a particularly venomous scorpion, the son of the blacksmith with whom the refugees are staying offers to ride into town to the clinic for an antidote. But the prefect has made it a crime for humans to ride horses, and the boy is spotted by an ape patrol and followed back to the stables, where he surrenders to save Virdon’s life. Galen knows the prefect of the town from where the boy was pursued, and goes to barter with him: Virdon, an expert horseman, will saddle-break and ride a particularly troublesome but promising horse in the next race. The prize for crossing the finish line is freedom – but when Urko takes that bet, the race is sure to be anything but fair.

Order the DVDswritten by David P. Lewis and Booker Bradshaw
directed by Jack Starrett
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: Morgan Woodward (Martin), John Hoyt (Barlow), Richard Devon (Zandar), Henry Levin (Prefect), Russ Marin (Damon), Meegan King (Gregor)

Notes: More well-known Star Trek guest stars show up here; John Hoyt was the original Enterprise doctor in the first Star Trek pilot, The Cage, and he appears here under ape makeup, reprising the role of Barlow from the second Planet Of The Apes TV episode, The Gladiators. Morgan Woodward was a staple of ’60s and ’70s TV guest spots, including multiple episodes of the original Star Trek and the TV spinoff of Logan’s Run. Just before the final race begins, Virdon winds up covered with mud – which conveniently hides that fact that the stunt rider in the race scenes clearly isn’t Ron Harper.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Interrogation

Planet Of The ApesThe travelers’ luck runs out as an ape patrol catches up with them; Burke is captured while Virdon and Galen are able to go into hiding. Dr. Zaius sees Burke’s capture as an opportunity to test a brainwashing technique devised by Wanda, one of his science ministers; General Urko is upset, since any interrogation falls under his jurisdiction. In Wanda’s hands, Burke’s brainwashing becomes something more like torture, as he is repeatedly asked to divulge the name and location of every human who has helped him evade capture until now. Though disappointed that he’s not the one interrogating Burke, Urko knows that Galen and Virdon are certain to come to the ape city to free their friend, and lays a trap. Galen seeks shelter from his parents, but Urko’s troops aren’t far behind them – and Urko’s parents, who hold positions of importance in the apes’ government, can’t be seen to help fugitives from justice. Can Burke be rescued before his mind is broken, and what will that rescue cost Galen’s family?

Order the DVDswritten by Richard Collins
directed by Alf Kjellin
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: Beverly Garland (Wanda), Anne Seymour (Ann), Normann Burton (Yalu), Booth Colman (Zaius), Lee Delano (Officer Gorilla), Wayne Foster (Lt. Gorilla), Lynn Benesch (Susan), Harry Townes (Dr. Malthus)

Notes: ’50s and ’60s movie mainstay Beverly Garland appears here, oddly enough, both in and out of ape makeup, while ’70s TV mainstay Anne Seymour puts in a prerequisite ’70s TV appearance. Her future genre appearances would include a short stint in the original Battlestar Galactica. Wanda mentions the “common” practice of removing the frontal lobes of humans’ brains to keep them docile, a practice depicted in the first Planet Of The Apes movie.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Tyrant

Planet Of The ApesBurke, Virdon and Galen are helping out in a human village, but have to take shelter when an ape garrison rolls into town to shake down the residents for a “tax” payment: the village’s entire crop of grains for the year. The three travelers offer their help, but the older humans in the settlement are too accustomed to being beaten down for the frequent payments. Only one villager’s brash young son is willing to help mount a resistance against the apes: in a fierce attack, the grain is hijacked and brought back to the villagers. The retaliation is swift and vicious: the young man who helped Virdon and Burke is gunned down in cold blood, and his father is injured, but left alive. News of the commotion draws Urko’s attention, but the local garrison commander is an old rival of his. That rivalry may be their key to escaping with their skin intact.

Order the DVDswritten by Walter Black
directed by Ralph Senensky
music by Lalo Schifrin

Planet Of The ApesGuest Cast: Percy Rodrigues (Aboro), Michael Conrad (Janor), Joseph Ruskin (Daku), Klair Bybee (Sam), Arlen Stuart (Gola), James Daughton (Mikal)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Cure

Planet Of The ApesGetting the feeling that they’ve outstayed their welcome at the most recent human village they’ve visited, the three travelers journey on before Urko catches word of their presence. But not long after they leave, they hear that the village they just left has been quarantined by apes, with a fatal disease spreading rapidly among the humans. Virdon recognizes the symptoms immediately: malaria has taken hold. Zoran, an ape doctor dispatched by Dr. Zaius and the apes’ science council, arrives to take charge of the scene, only to find that Virdon is already directing the effort to ease human suffering and cure those affected. Worse yet for Zoran, Virdon’s attempt to contain the disease seems to be working. He takes credit for Virdon’s efforts when he reports back to Zaius – and Urko immediately suspects that Zoran has help from the runaway astronauts.

Order the DVDswritten by Edward J. Lasko
directed by Bernard McEveety
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: Sondra Locke (Amy), David Sheiner (Zoran), Ron Soble (Kava), George Wallace (Talbert), Mark Lenard (Urko), Booth Colman (Zaius), Biff Elliot (Orangutan), Albert Cole (Mason), Ron Stein (Neesa), Charles Leland (Dying Man)

Planet Of The ApesNotes: Though she’s generally better known for her movie roles, particularly those in which she appeared alongside her real-life love interest Clint Eastwood, Sondra Locke was a familiar face on early ’70s TV, also appearing in Night Gallery, Kung Fu and Barnaby Jones, among others. The medical infomation in the story – battling malaria by deriving quinine from the bark of cinchona trees – is actually accurate, though that method of battling malaria was phased out in the 1940s with the advent of more reliable medicines.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Up Above The World So High

Planet Of The ApesVirdon, Burke and Galen spot something unusually large flying overhead; the two humans immediately recognize it as a primitive hang glider, which would represent a huge step forward for humans. The glider has also attracted the interest of the apes, however: Dr. Zaius sees great potential to enforce ape law from the air, while General Urko dismisses the glider as a toy. Its inventor is determined to keep developing it regardless of the risk, but when Virdon and Burke demonstrate some knowledge of flight, he instantly regards them with suspicion. And there’s someone else involved too – someone who sees the glider as the perfect way to drop bombs on the apes.

Order the DVDsteleplay by S. Bar-David and Arthur Browne Jr.
story by S. Bar-David
directed by John Meredyth Lucas
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: Joanna Barnes (Carsia), Frank Aletter (Leuric), Martin Brooks (Konag), Mark Lenard (Urko), Booth Colman (Zaius), William Beckley (Council Orang), Ron Stein (Gorilla Guard), Eldon Burke (2nd Trooper), Glenn Wilder (Human Driver)

Planet Of The ApesNotes: This was the final live-action Planet Of The Apes project until the 2001 remake movie directed by Tim Burton, and the last Planet Of The Apes media to feature Roddy McDowall (1928-1998). With declining ratings, and the show’s increasing tendency toward controversial subject matter (including an entire completed episode that CBS deemed unsuitable for air), CBS opted not to order further episodes of the series.

S. Bar-David is a pseudonym frequently used by writer Shimon Wincelberg; he also used this pseudonym on episodes of the original Star Trek. Director John Meredyth Lucas was a frequent writer and director on that show as well, and was a name often seen in one of those capacities in 1960s TV credits. He also wrote episodes of The Starlost and Logan’s Run.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

It’s All In Your Mind

Far-Out Space NutsAfter confusing “lunch” with “launch”, two launch pad employees are blasted into deep space. They frantically try to return to Earth, but are faced with the reality that they’re really just qualified to load food on a spaceship, not fly it.

Having already explored one planet where they found a lonely life form known as Honk, which communicates entirely by honking through a horn-like protrusion on its head, they land on a planet ruled by a mind-controlling computer named G.A.L., only to find that Junior’s thoughts somehow become reality here. That’s the only way they can escape G.A.L. and its sinister cybernetic henchmen.

written by Dick Robbins & Duane Poole
directed by Wes Kenney
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Leo Gordon (Head Dronek), Joan Gerber (voice of G.A.L.)

Notes: The series art director was Herman Zimmerman, who would go on to create the distinctive sets Star Trek: The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Star Trek V, Star Trek VI, Star Trek Generations, and so on. Representing Star Trek’s past was the show’s makeup chief, Fred Phillips, who had created and applied Mr. Spock’s Vulcan ears for the entire run of Star Trek in Far-Out Space Nutsthe 1960s. The name of the all-controlling computer, “G.A.L. 36-24-36”, is both a play on 2001: a space odyssey‘s HAL 9000, and a set of measurements that was likely intended to sail directly over the heads of the show’s young audience. (An almost identical gag was used a few years later as an episode title on Quark.)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Crystallites

Far-Out Space NutsAt their latest destination, Junior and Barney discover that they’re out of water. Junior and Honk go exploring to try to find a water source, but instead, Junior finds gourd-like fruit whose innards taste like chocolate. But he’s allergic to the fruit, and every time he sneezes, he turns into a giant green hairy beast without realizing it. But the locals aren’t worried about that…until they decide Junior is their next ruler.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), John Carradine (Ruler)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Robots Of Pod

Far-Out Space NutsThe lander is trapped on a planet where a full-scale robot uprising is taking place. Barney and Junior have to disguise themselves as robots to survive in the tyrannical rule of Mercurial, the robots’ overlord, and they have to stay alive long enough to help the other robots overthrow him.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Claudio Guzman
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Eve Bruce (Princess Lantana), Earle Doud (Mercurial)

Notes: Both of the creators of Far Out Space Nuts appear in the flesh in this episode: Chuck McCann appears in every episode as Barney, while Earle Doud put in an appearance as the robots’ ruler.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Sound Of Silence

IsisA classroom demonstration of a portable force field powered by a uranium pellet impresses Andrea’s friends, and intrigues the troubled student Bill, whose failure to win a recent science fair has left him without the means to buy a car. Desperate to overcome this obstacle, Bill steals the force field and offers to sell it to a local criminal, but rather than buying it from Bill, that criminal wants to pay Bill to be the one to use it. Worse yet, Andrea finds that the uranium pellet powering the device is leaking. Whoever has the force field device is in danger of radioactive contamination…but can she walk through the field by changing into Isis?

Get this season on DVDDownload this episode via Amazon's Unboxwritten by Sid Morse
directed by Arnold Laven
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

IsisCast: Joanna Cameron (Andrea Thomas), Brian Cutler (Rick Mason), Joanna Pang (Cindy Lee), Leigh McClocskey (Bill Cady), James Canning (B.J. Tanker), Philip Bruns (Jack Evans), Wayne Storm (Jocko), Albert Reed (Dr. Barnes)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Fantastic Journey

Far-Out Space NutsBarney and Junior are surrounded by mad scientists when one scientist, clearly a few test tubes short of a laboratory, asks for their help in finding another, who turns out to be just as insane. Can either one be trusted?

written by Buddy Atkinson & Dick Conway
directed by Claudio Guzman
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Kay E. Kuter (Dr. Kala), Stanley Ralph Ross (Dr. Drone), Whitney Rydbeck (Prof. Rundspock)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Tower Of Tagot

Far-Out Space NutsUsing his “future machine”, the mad tyrant Tagot sees a future in which Barney, Junior and Honk threaten his reign. The Sarians, who seek to end Tagot’s reign by rescuing their kidnapped queen, equip the wayward space travelers with such weapons as an inviso-ray and a bravery belt, because they’re equally sure that Barney and Junior pose a threat to Tagot. The only missing piece of the puzzle? Nobody knows how they’ll overthrow Tagot.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Robert Quarry (Zarlam), Barbara Rhoades (Pulma), Paul Wexler (Tagot)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Three Spaceketeers

Far-Out Space NutsAfter some simple housekeeping tasks go awry, Barney declares Junior “useless”…and Junior decides to strike out on his own, leaving Barney and Honk behind. Trouble immediately finds him in the form of two alien freedom fighters seeking to free their queen, who is imprisoned in a nearby fortress. These aliens believe that a great leader named “Junio” will guide them in their hour of greatest need…but, since they don’t know any better, “Junior” is drafted into their plan.

written by Dick Robbins & Duane Poole
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Bob Basso (Junio), Al Checco (Sporian #1), Robert Dunlap (Sporian #2), Howard George (Lizard #1), Jason Kincaid (Lizard #2), Kathryn Loder (Royal Helona)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Flight Of The Pippets

Far-Out Space NutsA tiny flying saucer buzzes Junior while he naps, and he soon meets the crew, who can make themselves as big as he is – or shrink themselves (and him) – with a device they carry. When Honk arrives to rescue the miniaturized Junior, the aliens flee…and Junior is still tiny. He may have to become even tinier to thwart the Pippets’ plan to be the big species on the block.

written by Earle Doud & Check McCann
directed by Al Schwartz
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Robert Dunlap (Pippet Captain), Michael Hawes (Pippet), Mickey Morton (Pippet)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Birds Of A Feather

Far-Out Space NutsA group of Motrons – chicken-like birdmen – abduct Barney and Junior. Their leader, Falco, intends to force Junior to sit on the sovereign egg of the Motrons’ aerie. The egg contains the Motrons’ next ruled, but unknown to the hapless humans, they’ve become pawns in a Motron power struggle. Falco’s underlings intend to take the egg out of circulation, removing Falco’s family from power, but to save their own skins, Barney and Junior hatch a plan of their own.

written by Earle Doud & Check McCann
directed by Al Schwartz
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), John Myhers (Falco), Paul Wexler (Motron #1), Robert Dunlap (Motron #2)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Dangerous Game

Far-Out Space NutsA strange space vortex appears in the path of the lander, and when Barney and Junior investigate, a werewolf-like creature boards their spaceship. They are taken to Salana, a woman who tells them they will compete in games and play to win…or face spending eternity as her living trophies. Her wolf-like minions, Lycos and Lobos, are free to pursue them and ensure that they are not victorious. And simply not playing, as Junior suggests, isn’t an option.

teleplay by Sam Locke and Paul Roberts
story by Duane Poole and Dick Robbins
directed by Al Schwartz
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), John Caisse (Lobos), Lynn Cartwright (Salana), Mickey Morton (Lycos)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Secrets Of The Hexagon

Far-Out Space NutsWhen Barney accuses Junior yet again of being a useless idiot, Junior is vulnerable to the new intergalactic con man who offers him the ability to turn his fortunes around. But this scam artist isn’t selling space snake oil: he’s offering something called the Hexagon, which can fulfill nearly any wish its owner desires. And the asking price? The space travelers’ lander. When Barney and Junior discover that they’ve been had, the race is on to out-scam the scammer.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Rudy Diaz (voice of the Hexagon), Howard George (Flam), Gus Peters (Tride), Hal Smith (Komak)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Captain Torque Space Pirate

Far-Out Space NutsCaptain Torque’s attempts to find an intergalactic treasure map have proven far too dangerous for his inept henchmen. He decides to enlist the help of the next two fools he happens across, and naturally Barney and Junior are the easiest choices. To ensure their cooperation, captain Torque holds their spaceship hostage…with no guarantee that he’ll give it back even if they do accomplish the mission he has given them.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Walter G. Miller
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Rudy Diaz (Captain Torque), Gus Peters (Henchman), Hal Smith (Intergalactic Patrol)

Notes: Many online resources place a comma in this episode’s title; the on-air title as broadcast contains no punctuation. Junior accidentally calls Captain Torque “Captain Turk” numerous times.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Vanishing Alien Mystery

Far-Out Space NutsA meteor storm forces Barney, Junior and Honk down on a derelict space station. They find that Lantana has also docked there, as have many others, for the reading of a space will. The deceased promises his entire fortune, including the station itself, to all present, and implores them to ignore legends that the station is haunted. But when the visitors to the station begin disappearing, one by one, it looks like someone wants to be the sole surviving benefactor of that space will…

written by Jack Mendelsohn
directed by Wes Kenney
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Eve Bruce (Lantana), Mitchell Young-Evans (Spector), Michael Hawes (Zomar), Stan Jenson (Crakor)

Notes: Possibly the only instance of anything resembling continuity in Far-Out Space Nuts, this episode features a Gromek (It’s All In Your Mind), a Pippet (Flight Of The Pippets, a Crystallite (The Crystallites), and Lantana herself (The Robots Of Pod).

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Flies

Ark IIIn the 25th century, centuries of human progress have taken their toll. Pollution and war have left the Earth a desolate wasteland. The scientific community, reduced to a small enclave hiding away from the scavengers and savages that roam the planet’s surface, puts all of its hopes into a mobile laboratory called Ark II, commanded by Jonah and crewed by young scientists Ruth and Samuel, and the sentient chimpanzee Adam.

Word reaches the Ark II crew of a marauding band of orphaned children pillaging weaker communities and preying on travelers. The only group in the area that wields more power is a group of well-armed warlords. Jonah ventures out on his own, discovering that an adult named Fagon is guiding the Flies, and he discovers something else even more disturbing: the Flies’ most recent looting “find” includes at least one canister of a poisonous gas. With the children willing to do whatever Fagon says, Jonah knows time is running out to keep the Flies from stepping up from petty crime to something far deadlier – to themselves and to the warlords.

The Flieswritten by Martin Roth
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Jonathan Harris (Fagon),Tierre Turner (Tick), Malachi Throne (War Lord Brack), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: Filmation Associates, famous for its numerous early ’70s cartoons (including Star Trek: The Animated Series), took The Fliesa bold step into live-action SF with Ark II. The centerpiece and home base of the show was Ark II itself, a custom-built vehicle on an existing truck chassis; contrary to urban legend, Ark II was a new vehicle, and was not the same vehicle as the Landmaster from Damnation Alley. Another new vehicle making an appearance here was the very real jetpack, developed and then abandoned by Bell Helicopter, which wound up in the hands of a hi-tech Hollywood prop rental service. It could only fly for thirty seconds before its fuel ran out, sending its pilot (a costumed stuntman, not actor Terry Lester) plummeting to the ground on at least one occasion. The production rented the jetpack for only eight of these brief flights, each of which was filmed by four cameras at the same time, ensuring a variety of stock footage. Ark II’s smaller “convertible SUV” The Fliesvehicle was called the Roamer.

Actor Jonathan Harris – famous for his role as the villainous (but hardly competent) Dr. Smith on Lost In Space, is the episode’s main guest star, but Filmation would hire him as the adult star of their next live-action genre show, Space Academy (which later morphed into Jason Of Star Command). Malachi Throne (a veteran of ’60s and ’70s TV fondly remembered for his appearances in early episodes of Star Trek) also guest stars.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Slaves

Ark IIJonah discovers a camp where a man named Baron Vargas has enslaved the people of an entire village, using “magic” to keep them under his power. As he is surveying the slave camp and working on a strategy to free its people, Jonah is captured by Vargas’ men and is put to work. He tries to lead a rebellion, but becomes the latest “victim” of Vargas’ “magic” – he’s dumped through a trap door and Vargas convinces the other slaves that he has turned Jonah into a chicken. Ruth, Samuel and Adam launch their own plan to free Jonah and the slaves, but they run the risk of being captured themselves.

The Slaveswritten by David Dworski
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Michael Kermoyan (Baron Vargas), Michael Mullins (Gideon), Karl Lukas (Cyrus), Charles Wagenheim (Old Slave), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Wild Boy

Ark IIJonah descends underground to retrieve mineral samples from an opening in the Earth. As Samual and Ruth monitor his progress on the surface, they are attacked by a boy who can’t even speak, though the approach of riders on horseback scares off their attacker. The riders’ leader, Simone, warns Jonah and his teammates about the “wild boy” who attacks anyone who approaches the abandoned mine, and expresses her desire to capture and tame the boy by any means necessary. Jonah thanks her for the warning, and instead makes it a point to befriend the boy next time he appears. Ruth and Samuel name the boy Isaiah and begin to teach him the basics of life in their vehicle, but when he sees the ore samples Jonah retrieved from the mine, he goes berzerk and runs away. Can anyone tame Isaiah, or is he trying to warn both Jonah and Simone of a greater danger?

Ark IIwritten by Susan Dworski
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Mitch Vogel (Isaiah), Jean Sarah Frost (Simone), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Robot

Ark IIThe Ark II crew enjoys a little bit of downtime. For Jonah, Ruth and Adam, this means fishing, though they’re slightly annoyed that their expert fisherman, Samuel, is spending his free time inside the Ark, working on his hobby project, a huge robot named Alpha-1 (or, to Samuel, “Alphie”). When toxic gas is detected in the air, and Jonah and his friends see strange behavior in people exposed to the gas, the vacation is over. Jonah orders Samuel to shut Alphie down because there’s serious work to be done. Alphie has other ideas, however, and escapes from the Ark. Now Jonah has to contend with a toxic gas and an escaped robot on the loose, either one of which could do serious harm.

The Slaveswritten by Chuck Menville and Len Janson
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Al Dunlap (Brant), Elizabeth Cheshire (Nestra), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam / voice of Alphie)

Notes: If Alphie looks familiar, it’s because he’s as close as anything in Ark II gets to being a genuine sci-fi icon: he’s better known as “Robby the Robot,” an invention of MGM’s prop shop for the 1956 movie Forbidden Planet. He has appeared in dozens of other productions since, including Lost In Space, Twilight Zone, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., and Ark II’s Filmation stablemate Space Academy.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Omega

Ark IIJonah brings the Ark II to a screeching halt when he sees an old man laying in the dust. This man has escaped from a society that was thriving only three weeks ago, until the reactivation of a 21st century computer led to the entire community falling under the computer’s mind control. The computer, called Omega, has a much easier time taking over the minds of the young, but with more time and effort it can control anyone’s mind. Marcus is the last holdout, and his granddaughter is already under Omega’s control. Jonah makes it his mission to free these people by deactivating Omega at any price… but before he can even start, Omega already has control over Samuel.

The Flieswritten by Bill Danch & Jim Ryan
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Harry Townes (Marcus), Helen Hunt (Diana), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam / voice of Omega)

Notes: Yes, it’s that Helen Hunt (of Mad About You fame), though it’s far from the young actress’ first role – she had been acting professionally for three years by the time of her appearance in Ark II. Veteran character actor Harry Townes was a fixture of the golden age of TV, guest starring in Twilight Zone, The Invaders, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, One Step Beyond, Inner Sanctum and Tales Of Tomorrow. He also appeared in The Outer Limits, the original Star Trek, Planet Of The Apes, Buck Rogers, and The Incredible Hulk. He died in 2001.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Tank

Ark IIAs the Ark is on the move through a valley filled with the remnants of machines of war, Samuel and Adam spot a girl being chased by a ragtag band of scavengers. Jonah and Samuel rush to her aid, but are brought up short by an amazing sight: one of the seemingly abandoned tanks is on the move. The distraction doesn’t stop the scavengers, however: they kidnap the girl, go to her village and demand a heavy ransom – most of that village’s food crops for the next year in exchange for her safe return. Jonah notices that one of the village’s young men is the one who was driving the tank. Jonah and his team offer their help in rescuing the girl, but to do so, Jonah may have to overcome his aversion to using the tank as the weapon is was meant to be.

The Fliesteleplay by Mark Jones & Michael Prescott and Robert Specht
story by Mark Jones & Michael Prescott
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Marhsall Thompson (Baxter), Chris Nelson (Zachery), Tony Ballen (Roman), Bonnie Van Dyke (Jewel), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Cryogenic Man

Ark IIThe Ark arrives in time for the unearthing of two cryogenic capsules buried in 1986; Jonah and his crew volunteer their technology to help revive the two men frozen inside. Despite their cryogenic capsules nearly failing during power-up and revival, the two businessmen from the 1980s survive and awaken. One of them wastes no time in trying to sell the locals on his miracle chemical which will supposedly grow healthy crops in the more dire of conditions. There’s a reason this chemical was phased out before 1986, but of course no one alive in the 25th century remembers that.

The Flieswritten by Martin Roth
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Jim Backus (Arnie Pool), John Fiedler (Norman Funk), Chuck Comisky (Jeb), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: Jim Backus is easily the highest-profile guest star of Ark II’s entire run. TV audiences remember him best as Mr. Howell from Gilligan’s Island.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Rule

Ark IIEn route to investigate a small group of cave dwellers to see if their quality of life can be improved, Ark II is attacked by scavengers. The shields are activated and the attack is thwarted, but Jonah and Samuel worry about Ruth, who is doing her own scouting in the Roamer vehicle. The Roamer does indeed run into trouble in rocky terrain, and Ruth is knocked out cold. Adam runs for help, while Ruth is carried to safety by a young man from a community which is harshly ruled by his father. As leader of this community, Martin fiercely applies “the rule”: the infirm and disabled cannot contribute to society, and must be cast out before they drag the rest of the community down. When Martin’s own son is injured, the rule applies to him as well – until Ruth and her friends from Ark II help him prove his worth.

Ark IIwritten by Martin Roth
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Philip Abbott (Martin), Davis Roberts (Mr. Jackson), Kenneth O’Brien (Rufus), David Abbott (Jeff), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Note: Philip Abbott and David Abbott, playing a father and son in this episode, were a real-life father and son who appeared in the same show on more than one occasion.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Robin Hood

Ark IIWhen Jonah hears of a war heating up between two communities – one of which is led by a man who has assumed the mantle of Robin Hood – he cuts short Adam’s driving lessons and positions Ark II between the battling factions and raises its shields, preventing them from fighting. But the vehicle can’t stay between the enemies for long. Jonah takes off to try to talk to “Robin Hood” to bring him to the table for peace talks, but while he’s gone the rest of his crew is captured. “Robin”‘s enemies have control of Ark II and intend to put its power to use as a weapon.

written by Chuck Menville & Len Janson
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Richard Angarola (Lord Leslie), Johnny Ark IIDoran (Alan), Victor Rogers (Robin Hood), Alfie Wise (Big John), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: This is one of the very few times in the series that any of the people visited by Ark II have motorized vehicles. The three-wheeled all-terrain vehicles used by Lord Leslie’s entourage, though very common now, weren’t a common sight in 1976. Also not common sights then, now or in the future: the Robin Hood costume and Lord Leslie’s very glittery, wizardly robes, both of which remained unnaturally clean in the desert-like dust of the post-apocalyptic future!

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Drought

Ark IIArk II investigates an area that hasn’t seen a drop of rain in over a month. A Morse code message flashed in a mirror warns Jonah and his crew to stay away; instead, Jonah and Ruth scouut ahead in the smaller, more agile Roamer. Samuel and Adam find Fagon and his gang of Flies nearby, and shares Ark II’s water supply with them before being lured outside by a cry for help. Once none of the Ark crew is aboard, Fagon hijacks the vehicle. Jonah straps on the jet pack to follow it. A nearby tribe is discovered to have a cloud-seeding device that could end the drought almost instantly, but instead they worship it – and plan to sacrifice Ruth and Samuel to it.

Ark IIwritten by Martin Roth
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Jonathan Harris (Fagon), Tierre Turner (Tick), Richard Balin (Witch Doctor), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: Fagon and the “Flies” were last seen in the first eisode of the series. Jonah’s comment about the jet pack’s low fuel is an in-joke about the prop’s inability to keep its wearer airborne for more than 30 seconds.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Lottery

Ark IIArk II explores a desert area bordering something that the local call “the forbidden zone,” where Jonah and Ruth watch as two men are prodded into the zone and vanish without a trace. When a third person is forced toward the zone, Jonah dons the jet pack and stops him from entering, demanding to know what’s going on. He learns that the leader of the young man’s village, Kane, has decreed a brutal form of population control: a lottery is held to determine which member of the community will be banished to the forbidden zone to ensure that there are enough resources left for rest of the village. The seemingly random bursts from a volcanic steam vent choose those who will be banished… except that Adam finds evidence that Kane has control over those burtsts, ensuring that those who oppose his laws are always the ones to be exiled. Ruth slips into the next party of exiles sent into the forbidden zone, and she finds herself in a strange dark voidi with the others who have been sent there against their will. But how can Ruth and the others be retrieved?

Ark IIwrittten by Phyllis & Robert White
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Zitto Kazann (Kane), David Goldmund (Steven), Eric Boles (Borg), Jim Boles (Benjamin), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: Samuel’s laser gear uses advanced 25th century Nixie tubes to display numbers. Two weeks after he made it dangerously obvious that he couldn’t drive the Ark, Adam has mastered the controls of the Roamer.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

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