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Where Is Everybody?

The Twilight ZoneA man awakens on the outskirts of the town of Oakwood, with no knowledge of how he got there – or even who he is. He can’t find another living creature anywhere in town – no policemen in the police station, no prisoners in the jail, no business owners in the shops. And yet he’s certain that he’s being watched by someone who has something to do with his present predicament. He pieces together clues that add up to an inescapable conclusion: someone else is in Oakwood with him. Whether he can figure out who it is before his sanity gives way is another question…

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Robert Stevens
music by Bernard Hermann

Cast: Earl Holliman (Mike Ferris), James Gregory (General), Paul Langton (Doctor), James McCallion (Reporter The Twilight Zone#1), John Conwell (Colonel), Jay Overholt (Reporter #2), Carter Mullally (Captain), Gary Walberg (Reporter #3), Jim Johnson (Staff Sergeant)

Notes: If Oakwood’s town square seems familiar, you’ve probably been time traveling with Doc Brown. The same outdoor set on the Universal Studios lot became the center of the town of Hill Valley in the Back To The Future movies.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

One For The Angels

The Twilight ZoneJoe Bookman, a small-time street vendor, plies his wares – mainly toys and ties – to anyone within earshot of his sales pitch. A well-dressed man appears, and Joe guesses he’s a census taker, since the man seems to know everything about him. But this stranger has an more sinister agenda: he is Death, and he’s come to make his appointment with Joe. Joe tries to trick him, so Death simply chooses another victim. Infuriated, Joe gets ready for the pitch of a lifetime: it’s time to sell Death on the idea of taking a holiday.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Robert Parrish
music not credited

The Twilight ZoneCast: Ed Wynn (Lou Bookman), Murray Hamilton (Death), Dana Dillaway (Maggie), Jay Overholts (Doctor), Merritt Bohn (Truck Driver)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Mr. Denton On Doomsday

The Twilight ZoneWashed-up gunslinger Al Denton, once a local legend, is now a local embarrassment, wasting away at a local saloon, tortured by younger men and by his own past. Denton finds a gun on the ground, and more by accident than by design he bests a local bully, regaining the respect of those around him, enough that he decides to go sober. Before the night is out, Denton is challenged to a gunfight, and he remembers how that life is what led him to drink in the first place. The mysterious elixir peddler Mr. Fate offers help in the form of a potion that improves Denton’s aim dramatically…for a very short period. But once word spreads that Denton is back in fine form, it’s not long before he has a challenger. Can Fate help break the cycle?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Allen Reisner
music not credited

The Twilight ZoneCast: Dan Duryea (Al Denton), Martin Landau (Dan), Jeanne Cooper (Liz), Malcolm Atterbury (Henry J. Fate), Ken Lynch (Charlie), Arthur Batanides (Leader), Bill Erwin (Man), Robert Burton (Doctor), Doug McClure (Grant)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Sixteen Millimeter Shrine

The Twilight Zone1930s starlet Barbara Jean Trenton hides away from the world in the mansion paid for by her film fame, the curtains drawn, constantly rewatching the movies she made in her heyday. Attempts to break back into Hollywood prove elusive in 1959; she balks at a comeback part in a minor role as another character’s mother. She becomes a recluse again, despite the best efforts of those around her to keep her surrendering her real life to the characters she portrayed a quarter of a century ago.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Mitchell Leisen
music by Franz Waxman

The Twilight ZoneCast: Ida Lupino (Barbara Jean Trenton), Martin Balsam (Danny Weiss), Jerome Cowan (Jerry Herndon), Ted de Corsia (Marty Sall), Alice Frost (Sally), Dean Stockwell (Daniel Wise)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Walking Distance

The Twilight ZoneWashed-up New York ad agency executive Martin Sloan returns home, on foot, to his home town of Homewood. When he sets foot in Homewood, he steps back in time, more literally than he realizes. He even encounters himself, though the intensity with which he tries to impart his wisdom to younger Martin scares the boy away. His parents – both still alive in this idealized past – are no more receptive to older Martin’s presence. How far will he go to warn his younger self of the mistakes that lie ahead?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Robert Stevens
music by Bernard Herrmann

The Twilight ZoneCast: Gig Young (Martin Sloan), Frank Overton (Robert Sloan), Irene Tedrow (Mrs. Sloan), Michael Montgomery (Young Marty, Ronnie Howard (Wilcox Boy), Byron Foulger (Charlie), Sheridan Comerate (Gas Station Attendant), Joseph Corey (Soda Jerk), Buzz Martin (Teenager), Nan Peterson (Woman in Park), Pat O’Malley (Mr. Wilson)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Escape Clause

The Twilight ZoneConvinced that he’s on his deathbed every day, hypochondriac Walter Bedeker makes a deal with the devil: in exchange for his soul, Walter will be made healthy and immortal. He also has an escape clause: if he decides to renege on the deal for whatever reason, he will die. Walter immediately becomes the clumsiest man around, miraculously surviving numerous “accidents” in public places with many witnesses, and then suing for an insurance settlement. But the thrill of these incidents wears thin on him; he decides to commit a crime so heinous that he’ll get to experience (and survive) the electric chair. But when he’s sentenced to “mere” life in prison with no possibility of parole, will he be able to back out on his immortality?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Mitchell Leisen
music by Bernard Herrmann

The Twilight ZoneCast: David Wayne (Walter Bedeker), Thomas Gomez (Cadwallader), Virginia Christine (Ethel Bedeker), Raymond Bailey (Doctor ), Wendell Holmes (Cooper), Dick Wilson (Jack), Joe Flynn (Steve ), Nesden Booth (Guard)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Lonely

The Twilight ZoneConvicted criminal James Corry is sentenced to live out his life on an asteroid with a breathable atmosphere, nine million miles from Earth. A rocket from Earth checks on him four times a year, and the desperate loneliness of isolation has driven Corry to begin regarding his jailkeepers as much-needed company. Captain Allenby smuggles a special gift to Corry: a female robot named Alicia, almost indistinguishable from a human woman. Left alone with a synthetic woman, will Corry find sanity and even love…or a new outlet for cruelty?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Jack Smight
music by Bernard Herrmann

Cast: Jack Warden (James Corry), John Dehner (Captain Allenby), Jean Marsh (Alicia), Ted Knight (Adams)

The Twilight ZoneNotes: British actress Jean Marsh would go on to create and star in Upstairs, Downstairs, but she also has a significant SF pedigree, going on to appear as two different characters in Doctor Who (short-lived TARDIS traveler Sara Kingdom in The Daleks’ Masterplan, 1965-66, and Morgaine in Battlefield, 1989). She appeared in the George Lucas-produced Willow in 1988, and has appeared in such series as The Love Boat, 9 To 5, UFO, and the 1990s revival of The Tomorrow People. She has since reprised the Doctor Who character of Sara Kingdom in the Companion Chronicles audio series.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Time Enough At Last

The Twilight ZoneHenpecked at home and unappreciated at work, bank teller Henry Bemis sneaks down to the bank vault to read on his lunch breaks. His wife resents his bookworm tendencies, and the bank manager doesn’t take too kindly to his reading habits either. One day during his lunchtime reading break, Henry falls asleep, only to be awakened by the sound of the end of the world: an atomic bomb. Protected in the bank vault, Bemis is the only survivor, and he can find no other living human beings. Helpless and on the verge of suicide, Bemis then realizes that he is now the last custodian, and consumer, of the world’s books.

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Rod Serling
based on a short story by Lynn Venable
directed by John Brahm
music by Leith Stevens

The Twilight ZoneCast: Burgess Meredith (Henry Bemis), Vaughn Taylor (Mr. Carsville), Jaqueline deWit (Helen Bemis), Lela Bliss (Mrs. Chester)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Perchance To Dream

The Twilight ZoneEdward Hall walks into a doctor’s office and claims that he can’t allow himself to fall asleep, lest a woman that he has seen only in a dream cause him to die in that dream, and in real life. The doctor warns Mr. Hall that staying awake much longer will cause him to have a heart attack and die. Then Mr. Hall realizes that the woman from his dream is following him even in his waking life…or perhaps she’s just the doctor’s receptionist.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Charles Beaumont
directed by Robert Florey
music by Van Cleave

Cast: Richard Conte (Edward Hall), John Larch (Dr. Rathmann), Suzanne Lloyd (Maya)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Judgment Night

The Twilight Zone1942: an Allied passenger ship, S.S. Queen of Glasgow, has become separated from her convoy in enemy waters during the height of the German U-Boat threat in World War II. One passenger, a Mr. Lanser, admits to being from Germany and seems very distracted. This arouses the suspicions of his fellow passengers, who begin trying to find out more about him. Lanser has little recollection of how he came to board the Queen of Glasgow, but his memory returns at the same time the others discover his true identity: he’s a German boat captain – the one responsible for sinking the S.S. Queen of Glasgow.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by John Brahm
music not credited

Cast: Nehemiah Persoff (Carl Lanser), Deirdre Owen (Barbara Stanley), Patrick Macnee (First Officer McLeod), Ben Wright (Captain Wilbur), Leslie Bradley (Major Devereaux), Kendrick Huxham (Bartender), Hugh Sanders (Potter), Richard Peel (1st Steward), Donald Journeaux (2nd Steward), Barry Bernard (Engineer), James Franciscus (Lt. Mueller)

The Twilight ZoneNotes: This is one of those Twilight Zone episodes that’s crawling with future genre stars, including Patrick Macnee (1922-2015), barely two years before taking on the role of Steed in ITV’s The Avengers, James Franciscus (1934-1991), future star of Beneath The Planet Of The Apes, and Nehemiah Persoff, who guest starred in Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea, The Six Million Dollar Man, Logan’s Run, Battlestar Galactica, The Bionic Woman, and Star Trek: The Next Generation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

And When The Sky Was Opened

The Twilight ZoneA spacecraft that flew 900 miles above Earth and then vanished for 24 hours returns, with its crew of three intact. But one of the astronauts, Major Gart, doesn’t remember one of the others; he only recalls a crew of two. His crewmate, Forbes, remembers the presence of a third man, Harrington, but Forbes is the only one who seems to remember him. And then suddenly, Gart no longer remembers Forbes…

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Charles Beaumont
based on a short story by Richard Matheson
directed by Douglas Heyes
music by Leonard Rosenman

The Twilight ZoneCast: Rod Taylor (Lt. Col. Clegg Forbes), James Hutton (Maj. William Gart), Charles Aidman (Col. Ed Harrington), Maxine Cooper (Amy ), Paul Bryar (Bartender), Sue Randall (Nurse), Joe Bassett (Medical Officer)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

What You Need

The Twilight ZoneA man desperate for a job holds down a corner stool at the local bar, unable to afford a drink, until an older man promises him that “what you need” is coming soon. Moments later, the phone rings with a much-hoped-for job offer. Another man at the bar, harboring a more dangerous desperation, follows the old man in the hopes that he can also score a miracle. Reluctantly, just such a minor miracle is handed to him by the old man, but that isn’t enough: he wants a steady string of “what you need” and he’ll stop at nothing to get it.

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Rod Serling
based on a short story by Lewis Padgett (pseudonym for Henry Kuttner)
directed by Alvin Ganzer
music by Van Cleave

The Twilight ZoneCast: Steve Cochran (Fred Renard), Ernest Truex (Pedott), Read Morgan (Lefty), Arline Sax (Girl in Bar), William Edmonson (Bartender), Doris Karnes (Woman), Fred Kruger (Man on Street), Norman Sturgis (Hotel Clerk)

Notes: A dark and somber Christmas episode by any measure, What You Need isn’t really overtly a “Christmas special”…but perhaps has a warning for those who aren’t appreciative of their gifts. Arline Sax was later known by the stage name Arlene Martel.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Four Of Us Are Dying

The Twilight ZoneArch Hammer, a man with an uncanny ability to change his face to look like others, checks into a hotel room with a plan to impersonate several recently deceased men in an attempt to swindle their acquaintances out of money, love, or both. When he tries to escape the lair of a mob boss whose money he’s just taken, he must change his face to resemble that of a man whose picture he saw just moments ago…only to have that man’s past catch up with him.

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Rod Serling
based on a short story by George Clayton Johnson
directed by John Brahm
music by Jerry Goldsmith

Cast: Harry Townes (Arch Hammer), Phillip Pine (Virge Sterig), Ross Martin (Johnny Foster), Don Gordon (Andy The Twilight ZoneMarshak), Harry Jackson (Trumpeter), Bernard Fein (Mr. Penell), Peter Brocco (Mr. Marshak), Milton Frome (Detective), Beverly Garland (Maggie)

Notes: This is an early TV scoring credit for composer Jerry Goldsmith (1929-2004), who was only about five years into his storied career as a TV/film composer when he scored this, his first Twilight Zone episode.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Third From The Sun

The Twilight ZoneOn the eve of a global holocaust, two men who work on hydrogen weapons and the means of delivering them to their targets meet with their families. They have a plan: the government has also been secretly working on a craft capable of interstellar flight. They will steal this vehicle and resettle on another world, one they hope is free from the kind of madness that could wipe out all life on its surface…one that is the third planet from its sun. Unless, of course, someone from their own world puts a stop to their plan.

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Rod Serling
based on the short story by Richard Matheson
directed by Richard L. Bare
music not credited

The Twilight ZoneCast: Fritz Weaver (William Sturka), Edward Andrews (Carling), Joe Maross (Jerry Riden), Denise Alexander (Jody Sturka), Lori March (Eve Sturka), Jeanne Evans (Ann Riden)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

I Shot An Arrow Into The Air

The Twilight ZoneA rocket manned by eight astronauts is launched, and then disappears off of the scopes. Of the eight-man crew, four survive the rocket’s crash landing, into what they believe to be an asteroid near Earth’s orbit, since the sun is approximately the same size in the sky. The asteroid has a conveniently breathable atmosphere, but between them, the four survivors have only five gallons of water. One of them suffered critical injuries in the crash, but the mission’s commander refuses to entertain notions that water no longer be “wasted” on the injured. His subordinates, however, are feeling less charitable, until the expedition is whittled down to a single survivor…who finds that he’s far closer to home than he thought.

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Rod Serling
based on the story by Madelon Champion
directed by Stuart Rosenberg
music not credited

The Twilight ZoneCast: Dewey Martin (Corey), Edward Binns (Colonel Donlin), Ted Otis (Pierson), Harry Bartell (Langford), Leslie Barrett (Brandt)

Notes: The “asteroid” exteriors were shot in Death Valley, so it’s likely that the cast members were in need of water almost as badly as their characters…

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Hitch-Hiker

The Twilight ZoneA highway blowout at high speed, which could be a fatal accident in the making, merely proves to be a good scare for young Nan Adams during her cross-country drive. As she waits for a new tire to be put on her car, she first spots him: a nondescript hitchhiker, beckoning to her from the highway. Even when she resumes her trip, she keeps seeing him, and fears losing her sanity. She’s afraid to stop for him, and yet he’s everywhere. Where does he want to go…or, more precisely, where does he want her to go?

Download this episode via Amazonteleplay by Rod Serling
based on the radio play by Lucille Fletcher
directed by Alvin Ganzer
music not credited

Cast: Inger Stevens (Nan Adams), Adam Williams (Sailor), Lew Gallo (Mechanic), Leonard Strong (The Hitch-Hiker), Russ Bender (Counterman), George Mitchell (Gas Station Man)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Fever

The Twilight ZoneFranklin Gibbs is annoyed by his wife’s insistence that they vacation in Las Vegas, especially when she feeds a single nickel into a slot machine. At the insistence of a drunken casino patron, Franklin himself gives a nickel to the one-armed bandit, only to win a payout. Unable to sleep that night, Franklin gathers up his winnings and declares that it’s “tainted” money that he must rid himself of by going back to the casino to put it back into the machine from which it came. Hours later, he’s still there, having fallen for the trap, the illusion that if he keeps playing, he can win again.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Rod Serling
directed by Robert Florey
music not credited

The Twilight ZoneCast: Everett Sloane (Franklin gibbs), Vivi Janiss (Flora Gibbs), William Kendis (Hansen), Lee Millar (Joe), Lee Sands (Floor Manager), Marc Towers (Cashier), Art Lewis (Drunk), Arthur Peterson (Sheriff)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Last Flight

The Twilight ZoneSecond Lieutenant William Decker of the Royal Flying Corps lands his biplane on an American airstrip on French soil, but is astonished at the other planes nearby, and at the extraordinary reception he gets. Somehow he has traveled from 1917 to 1959, with no idea of how he came to be where and when he is. Now the question becomes: can he go back…and should he go back?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Richard Matheson
directed by William Claxton
music not credited

The Twilight ZoneCast: Kenneth Haigh (William Decker), Alexander Scourby (General Harper), Simon Scott (Major Wilson), Robert Warwick (MacKaye), Harry Raybould (Corporal), Jerry Catron (Guard)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Reluctant Stowaway

Lost In SpaceOctober 16, 1997: with Earth suffering from extreme depletion of resources, the race is on to colonize planets in nearby star systems, starting with a planet orbiting Alpha Centauri. The Jupiter 2 is prepared for launch, to be crewed by the Robinson family – Dr. John Robinson, Dr. Maureen Robinson, and their children, Judy, Penny, and Will – and the pilot, Major Don West. With the stakes so high, sabotage is almost expected, and indeed a saboteur has snuck aboard the Jupiter 2, one Dr. Zachary Smith, who has programmed the robot to destroy the Jupiter 2 with all hands aboard at eight hours into the mission. But Smith is as inept as he is evil, and is stuck aboard the ship when it lifts off. While trying (and failing) to convincingly explain his presence to the Robinsons when the Jupiter 2 goes off course, Smith now has to undo his own act of sabotage…or become a victim of his own plot.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by S. Bar-David
directed by Tony Leader
music by Johnny Williams

Lost In SpaceCast: Guy Williams (Dr. John Robinson), June Lockhart (Maureen Robinson), Mark Goddard (Don West), Marta Kristen (Judy Robinson), Billy Mumy (Will Robinson), Angela Cartwright (Penny Robinson), Jonathan Harris (Dr. Zachary Smith), Hoke Howell (Security Guard), Tom Allen (Inspector), Fred Crane (Alpha Control Technician), Don Forbes (TV Commentator), Bob May (Robot), Brett Parker (Security Guard), Ford Rainey (President), Hal Torey (General), Dick Tufeld (Robot voice / Narrator), Paul Zastupnevich (Bearded Foreign Correspondent)

Lost In SpaceNotes: None of the guest stars, except for Jonathan Harris (who is credited in every episode of the series as a “special guest star”), are credited on screen. Don’t let “received wisdom” convince you that Lost In Space is a giant ball of interstellar cheese; the show is actually quite forward-looking in some areas, including John Robinson’s use of a multi-directional jet gun during his spacewalk, very much like the one recently used by U.S. astronaut Ed White during the first NASA spacewalk earlier in 1965.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Genesis II

Genesis IIIn 1979, NASA researcher Dylan Hunt volunteers to become the first human test subject of a process of suspended animation that he has helped to develop for long space journeys. Rather than freezing its subjects, Hunt’s process relies on a special combination of drugs and a chamber pressurized with a mixture of gases that shut down the body’s metabolic processes without killing the subject. During the pressurization of Hunt’s sleeping chamber, a major earthquake strikes the underground facility, forcing the scientists there to evacuate. Dylan Hunt is left behind, buried alive beneath Carlsbad Caverns.

Hunt is awakened by a team that obviously isn’t working for NASA, and is told that it is now 2133. The underground caverns are occupied by an organization called PAX, but Hunt’s caretaker, Lyra-A, isn’t a member of PAX. She’s a mutant – as can be seen by her second navel – and claims that PAX is a civilization of warmongers, masquerading as pacifists, lurking underground and waiting to strike at the more civilized people who live on Earth’s surface. Hunt accepts Lyra-A’s offer of an escape to her city, Tyrannia, only to find an oppressive mutant regime enslaving humans.

written by Gene Roddenberry
directed by John Llewellyn Moxey
music by Harry Sukman

Genesis IICast: Alex Cord (Dylan Hunt), Mariette Hartley (Lyra-a), Ted Cassidy (Isiah), Percy Rodrigues (Primus Kimbridge), Harvey Jason (Singh), Titos Vandis (Primus Yuloff), Bill Striglos (Kellum), Lynne Marta (Primus Harper-Smythe), Harry Raybold (Slan-n), Majel Barrett (Primus Dominic), Leon Askin (Overseer), Liam Dunn (Janos), Scott Graham (Tyranian Teacher), Ed Ashley (Wehr-r), Linda Grant (Astrid), Robert Swan (Lahyn-n), Beulah Quo (Primus Lu Chan), Dennis Robertson (General), Ray Young (Tyranian Teacher #2), Tom Pace (Brian), Teryl Willis (Cardiologist), David Westburg (Station Operator), Robert Hathaway (Shuttle Car Operator), Tammi Bula (Teenager)

Genesis IINotes: If Gene Roddenberry liked working with you that one time, Gene Roddenberry will hire you again. Cases in point: Ted Cassidy played Ruk in the Star Trek episode What Are Little Girls Made Of?, while Mariette Hartley guest starred in one of the final original Trek episodes, All Our Yesterdays. Percy Rodrigues put Captain Kirk on trial in Court-Martial, and appeared in other genre series such as The Starlost and the television incarnation of Planet Of The Apes before going on to become one of the 1970s’ most frequently employed movie trailer voice-over Genesis IIartists. Dylan Hunt would be recast in his next TV adventure (1974’s Planet Earth), and would be renamed (but not recast) for one last try-out in the 20th century, 1975’s Strange New World; Roddenberry’s Dylan Hunt/PAX concept wouldn’t be revisited further until a space-based revamp transformed it into the 21st century syndicated series Gene Roddenberry’s Andromeda, for which all of the earlier attempts nearly 30 years earlier can be regarded misfired pilots.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Joy Riders

Shazam!Young Billy Batson has been given a special power by the immortals: by speaking the word “Shazam!”, he can transform into Captain Marvel. But this is a last resort, as Billy himself is meant to be learning from both the immortals and Mentor as they travel across the country.

Billy and Mentor take note of a group of boys who are starting down a dangerous path, “harmlessly” borrowing cars for joyrides. One of the boys, Chuck, is less enthusiastic about joining his friends; he knows they’re doing something wrong. But when the peer pressure mounts, Chuck gives in and joins them, finding himself in enough trouble that it may take Captain Marvel to save them.

written by Len Janson & Chuck Menville
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Horta-Mahana

Shazam!Cast: Michael Gray (Billy Batson), Les Tremayne (Mentor), Jackson Bostwick (Captain Marvel), Kerry MacLane (Chuck Wagner), Barry Miller (Mike), Ty Henderson (Kyle), Lee Joe Casey (Rich)

Notes: Ty Henderson would be cast as a series regular on a later Filmation live-action series, Space Academy. This is not the first filmed adaptation of Captain Marvel; the first was a 1941 theatrical serial released during the character’s WWII heyday, at a time when Fawcett Publications’ Captain Marvel comic book was routinely outselling Superman, published by rival National Comics (later to change names to Shazam!DC Comics). But that was also the year that National Comics sued Fawcett for copyright infrignement, a suit that was initially decided in Fawcett’s favor, but a 1951 appeal gave National Comics the upper hand. The two companies settled out of court, with Fawcett backing out of the comics business altogether. DC Comics licensed and revived Captain Marvel – quite probably for the sheer perversity of keeping a character named Captain Marvel out of the hands of its new rival, Marvel Comics – in 1972, keeping the character alive through what is now widely regarded as the Silver Age of comics. In 1980, DC put enough money on the table for Fawcett to hand over all rights to Captain Marvel and its other comics to DC in perpetuity.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Escape From Tomorrow

Planet Of The ApesA human spacecraft launched in 1980 is captured in a time warp and thrown into the far future. It comes in for a landing on Earth again, over a millennium later in the year 3085; humanity has been reduced to frightened scavengers, with highly evolved apes as their overlords. Of the three crewmen aboard the vehicle, only astronauts Alan Virdon and Pete Burke survive, and they are moved to a place of safety by an old man named Farrow shortly before their ship is found by apes.

Virdon and Burke are captured and brought to trial before the apes’ high council, and while the apes’ leader, Dr. Zaius, believes they must be kept alive to learn the secrets of their technology. Urko, however, feels that the humans are a threat to the ape way of life and wants them executed now – and he demonstrates the use of a human-made grenade to make his point. But the humans’ scientific knowledge intrigues Zauis’ curious assistant, Galen. When he dares to speak on the humans’ behalf, Zaius silences him. Galen then learns that Urko is plotting to kill the humans regardless of Zaius’ wishes; when Galen goes to warn the humans, he winds up in a life-or-death struggle with one of Urko’s guards, and accidentally kills him. Galen is imprisoned, and is stunned when Virdon and Burke arrive to mount a jailbreak.

No longer welcome among his own kind, Galen tags along with the two humans as they try to get their ship ready for a relaunch. The arrival of Urko’s soldiers cuts the repairs short, and when Urko destroys the spaceship, Virdon and Burke are trapped in this time – with only Galen as their guide.

Season 1 Regular Cast: Roddy McDowall (Galen), Ron Harper (Alan Virdon), James Naughton (Pete Burke)

Order the DVDswritten by Art Wallace
directed by Don Weis
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: Royal Dano (Farrow), Woodrow Parfrey (Veska), Mark Lenard (Urko), Booth Colman (Zaius), Biff Elliot (Ullman), Bobby Porter (Arno), Jerome Thor (Proto), William Beckley (Grundig), Alvin Hammer (Man)

Notes: Where the TV series fits into the continuity of the films is uncertain; Zaius mentions a previous visit from human astronauts “10 years ago,” an adventure in which the astronauts were killed, almost certainly referring to the original film. However, since Beneath The Planet Of The Apes takes place immediately after that film, and ends with the destruction of all life on Earth, there are two possibilities: the nuclear holocaust from which Cornelius and Zira escapes in Escape From The Planet Of The Apes may have been overstated, or, as strongly hinted in Battle For The Planet Of The Apes, history has been changed as a result of Cornelius and Zira going into the past. This latter theory is strongly reinforced by the fact that humans have the power of speech and the English language has survived. While that is likely dictated by production realities – the series would’ve been boring at best if Virdon and Burke were the only humans capable of speaking – it would seem to indicate that, while the incident with Taylor did happen, it took place in a parallel timeline in which humans had retained their intelligence; as Zaius later says that the last human visitors didn’t live long enough for him to learn their names, it would seem that Taylor’s visit unfolded even more violently than chronicled in the first movie, again suggesting an alternate timeline.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Brothers

Shazam!Danny Martin and his blind younger brother Chad are on a nature hike when Chad grows tired of Danny’s over-protective attitude. Chad runs away, ending up in the middle of the highway, where Billy and Mentor nearly hit him. Quickly discovering that Chad is blind (despite the boy’s best efforts not to tell them), they wait for Danny to catch up. Billy tries to coach Chad on making better use of his senses of sound and smell to help him, but Danny is still overprotective – until he’s bitten by a rattlesnake and needs Chad (with an assist from Captain Marvel) to find help.

written by Len Janson & Chuck Menville
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
Shazam!music by Horta-Mahana

Cast: Michael Gray (Billy Batson), Les Tremayne (Mentor), Jackson Bostwick (Captain Marvel), Lance Kerwin (Chad Martin), Steve Tanner (Danny Martin)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Gladiators

Planet Of The ApesAs Virdon, Burke and Galen explore their world, stopping to sample the local fruit until the hear the sounds of fighting nearby. The two astronauts intervene when they find two men apparently intent on beating each other to a pulp. Burke intervenes, but instead of finding a victim grateful that his attacker has been beaten off, he finds himself targeted by both combatants. Virdon joins in until the sound of approaching ape soldiers drives the astronauts into hiding. Virdon realizes that his most prized possession – a disc from the spaceship’s flight recorder that might prove useful in reconstructing the events leading up to the time warp – was dropped during the fight, and is now in the hands of the local ape prefect. Virdon, Burke and Galen go to retrieve the disc, and Galen offers to take the point, as he’ll have less trouble blending into an ape community. Virdon and Burke, on the other hand, are arrested for trying to steal horses. Burke is singled out to participate in gladiatorial games against another human – Tolar, the older of the two men they spotted fighting before. Burke beats Tolar in hand-to-hand combat, but refuses to kill him when a sword is thrown into the arena. Rather than inspiring humans and apes alike with this act of mercy, Burke has merely made a new human enemy by violating a primitive code of honor – and they’re no closer to retrieving the disc.

Order the DVDswritten by Art Wallace
directed by Don McDougall
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: William Smith (Tolar), John Hoyt (Barlow), Marc Singer (Dalton), Mark Lenard (General Urko), Pat Renell (Jason), Andy Albin (Man), Eddie Fontaine (Gorilla Sergeant), Nick Dimitri (A Gorilla), Ron Stein (1st Gorilla), Jim Stader (2nd Gorilla)

Notes: A number of past and future SF TV veterans appear here, most notably Mark Lenard – best known for playing the part of Spock’s father Sarek in the original Star Trek – shows up again as the astronauts’ recurring arch-rival General Urko. John Hoyt also puts in an appearance; he had played the part of the Enterprise’s original chief medical officer, Dr. Boyce, in the Star Trek pilot The Cage. And future V veteran Marc Singer can be seen here as well, putting in an early-career guest appearance.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Thou Shalt Not Kill

Shazam!Lynn is upset that her favorite horse, Becket, is scheduled to be put down because he’s been deemed dangerous by a rancher who blames Becket for injuring him. Mentor and Billy arrive on the scene and introduce Lynn to the idea of a peaceful protest to delay Becket’s “execution”. When the local sheriff – who also happens to be Lynn’s father – points out that the protest is within the law and on public property, the rancher decides that a demonstration of how dangerous Becket is will change everyone’s minds. Captain Marvel has to save the horse’s life.

written by Marianne Mosner
directed by Arthur H. Nadel
music by Horta-Mahana

Shazam!Cast: Michael Gray (Billy Batson), Les Tremayne (Mentor), Jackson Bostwick (Captain Marvel), Pamelyn Ferdin (Lynn Colby), William Sargent (Sheriff Colby), John Karlen (Nick)

Notes:Another future Space Academy cast member puts in a guest appearance; Pamelyn Ferdin would become one of the later Filmation show’s leads.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Trap

Planet Of The ApesGeneral Urko intensifies his search for Virdon, Burke and Galen – he’s taken it on as his personal mission. He pursues them into a territory stricken by frequent earthquakes…and a village known for sheltering humans on the run from their ape masters. Virdon is less interested in the earthquakes than he is in artifacts which are unknown to the humans of this era…but he recognizes them as pieces of a computer. Over Burke’s protests, Virdon and company set out to the ruins of a city where the pieces were found – a place which also happens to be the epicenter of the earthquakes. Urko and his troops follow, and just as Urko captures Burke, a violent quake sends both of them tumbling into an underground chamber which is then sealed off by debris. When Burke comes to, he recognizes it as a subway station. Burke does his best to convince Urko to let him stay alive: the ape doesn’t know enough about the “ancient” subway to find his way back to freedom, so he needs Burke’s help. But with the already-stale air running out underground, Urko’s patience is also running out…and with it, Burke’s time.

Order the DVDswritten by Edward J. Lasko
directed by Arnold Laven
music by Richard LaSalle

Guest Cast: Mark Lenard (Urko), Norm Alden (Zako), John Milford (Miller), Cindy Eilbacher (Lisa Miller), Mickey LeClair (Jick Miller), Wallace Earl (Mary Miller), Gail Bonney (Old Woman)

Notes: The BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) subway station pinpoints The Trap’s location as the ruins of San Francisco, but Burke is obviously from a more advanced future San Francisco: his talks about nuclear-powered subway trains, meals in a pill and replacement organs as commonplace items.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Good Seeds

Planet Of The ApesUrko’s troops pursue the fugitives to the point of exhaustion – and that leads to clumsy missteps. Virdon and Burke have to carry Galen on a stretcher to the nearest settlement, where they’re met with the usual stares of distrust. There is one bit of good luck: they’ve stumbled into an ape farming settlement, and one that needs extra laborers, in exchange for which the apes – though still suspicious – are willing to hide them from Urko’s patrols. Virdon’s own experiences growing up on a farm lead him to start giving advice on how to make the farm run much more smoothly, from the use of simple machines to better methods of planting crops. But are Virdon’s improvements – completely unorthodox in this primitive era – going to buy Galen time to heal…or will they draw too much attention from the patrols?

Order the DVDswritten by Robert W. Lenski
directed by Don Weis
music by Lalo Schifrin

Guest Cast: Geoffrey Deuel (Anto), Lonny Chapman (Polar), Jacqueline Scott (Zantes), Mark Lenard (Urko), Bobby Porter (Remus), Eileen Dietz Elber (Jillia), John Garwood (Police Gorilla), Dennis Cross (Gorilla Officer), Michael Carr (Patrol Rider), Fred Lerner (Police Gorilla)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Legacy

Planet Of The ApesVirdon, Burke and Galen find the ruins of a city – once known to them as Oakland – and find it inhabited by humans, though the approach of an ape patrol on horseback is enough to scatter anyone who might welcome the travelers. They take refuge in a building that was once the Oakland Science Institute – a place that Virdon remembers as a government think tank – where they discover a piece of equipment locked away for centuries, intact and functional: a hologram promising the sum total of human knowledge at the time of the then-approaching apocalypse. It needs a new battery before it will divulge any of that knowledge, however, and Virdon becomes nearly obsessed with constructing a new battery; even just before his capture, he tells Burke that extracting the information is more important than the lives of any one of the group. Virdon is captured by Urko’s troops, but while Urko is eager to torture his prisoner, Dr. Zaius arrives to conduct the interrogation by far subtler means. Virdon may not even realize that he is betraying his fellow fugitives…or that he’s handing over the sum of human knowledge to the apes.

Order the DVDswritten by Robert Hamner
directed by Bernard McEveety
music by Earle Hagen

Guest Cast: Zina Bethune (Arn), Jackie Earle Haley (Kraik), Robert Phillips (Gorilla Captain), Mark Lenard (Urko), Booth Colman (Zaius), Jon Lormer (Scientist), Wayne Foster (Gorilla Sergeant), Victor Kilian (Human)

Notes: Director Bernard McEveety (1924-2004) was the brother of Star Trek director Victor McEveety, whose six turns in the director’s chair on that series included some of its more memorable episodes; both brothers also directed episodes of Buck Rogers. Bernard McEveety’s other genre credits include episodes of Airwolf, Blue Thunder, Voyagers!, The Incredible Hulk, and Knight Rider, but he may be best remembered as the director of the miniseries How The West Was Won. The city ruins seen in The Legacy look remarkably like those seen in The Trap, aired mere weeks earlier.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Tomorrow’s Tide

Planet Of The ApesVirdon, Burke and Galen are making good time along a shoreline, with the humans actually traveling on foot in the water as much as possible so the tide will cover their tracks; Galen is having none of it, preferring to stay well away from the water. They spot what appears to be a damaged raft adrift, and Burke and Virdon swim out to retrieve it, finding a man lashed helplessly to it: someone tied him to it and left him for dead at sea. The exhausted man wears a metal band indicating that he was a slave from a forced labor camp. Virdon and Burke scout out the nearby labor camp, where humans are forced to spear-fish at gunpoint by their ape masters, but they are captured by the guards and brought before Hurton, the camp’s commandant. They prove their ability to fish under fire – literally – but in order to prevent them from becoming trapped at Hurton’s camp, Galen appears, claiming that Virdon and Burke are his wayward slaves. But instead of releasing them, Hurton decides they should answer for their crimes to the “gods of the sea” – the plentiful sharks that have claimed many a fisherman in these waters. But even after thwarting this attempt to kill them, the two astronauts face a new threat: the man they rescued has been discovered…and Hurton’s over-eager security chief is more than happy to blame the newcomers for this, and punish them accordingly.

Order the DVDswritten by Robert W. Lenski
directed by Don McDougall
music by Earle Hagen

Guest Cast: Roscoe Lee Browne (Hurton), Jay Robinson (Bandor), John McLiam (Gahto), Jim Storm (Romar), Kathleen Bracken (Soma), Larry Ellis (Drayman #2)

Notes: Actor Roscoe Lee Browne is well-known in genre circles for two other genre appearances in the 1970s: he appeared as the gleaming robot Box in Logan’s Run (1976), and later narrated the best-selling storybook record The Story Of Star Wars in the wake of that film’s success. While the episode boasts some beautiful location filming and impressive underwater scenes for a TV budget, the “shark” props used (usually before a glimpse of stock footage of real sharks) are, perhaps, a little bit less than convincing.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Surgeon

Planet Of The ApesAn ape ambush catches the fugitives off-guard; Virdon takes a bullet. They go into hiding before they can be found, and Galen decides to return to the ape hospital in the outskirts of the central city. His ex-fiancee, an ape surgeon named Kira, should be able to help, and Galen believes he can come up with a cover story to get Virdon into the hospital without immediately being arrested by Urko’s security forces. But even once Virdon is in the hospital, Dr. Kira can’t help him: she knows nothing about human medicine. Galen knows where to find a text on that subject…but it means venturing into the heart of the city and breaking into Dr. Zaius’ secret stash of human artifacts – right under the nose of General Urko.

Order the DVDswritten by Barry Oringer
directed by Arnold Laven
music not credited

Guest Cast: Jacqueline Scott (Kira), Michael Strong (Travin), Martin Brooks (Leander), Mark Lenard (Urko), Booth Colman (Zaius), Jamie Smith Jackson (Girl), David Naughton (Dr. Stole), Raymond Mayo (Human), Diana Hale (Brigid), Phil Montgomery (Jordo)

Notes: There is no incidental music score credit for this episode, only a theme music credit for composer Lalo Schifrin. Library music pieces may have been used.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

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