Arrival

The PrisonerAn agent of the British Foreign Office unexpectedly submits his resignation, setting into motion a chain of events that will forever change his life. A black car trails him to his home, and he is gassed. When he awakens, he is in the Village, a gaily-colored, self-contained community whose residents seem to know nothing beyond its boundaries, and seem to be unwilling to question that oddity. No one seems to know who he is, and no one knows his name. A man identifying himself as Number Two invites him to lunch, and it is a most revealing meal. The reason for the abduction and enforced exile of the newly-christened “Number Six” is revealed – certain unnamed parties are stopping at nothing to prevent his classified knowledge from falling into the wrong hands…or perhaps from reaching the right hands. Number Two makes it clear that no one leaves the Village – and Number Six suspects that the penalty for doing so would be death, especially when Number Two demonstrates a deadly security device called Rover. Despite the danger and the vaguely implied threats, Number Six mounts a valiant escape attempt, but he is captured by the Rover and taken to the Village’s hospital. When he awakens, he is sharing a hospital ward with a fellow agent named Cobb, who also doesn’t remember how he came to be in the Village. Not long afterward, Cobb is reported to have committed suicide, though Number Six immediately suspects something far more sinister. But even most macabre speculation is nowhere near the truth of what happened to his colleague…or what is happening to him now.

written by George Markstein and David Tomblin
directed by Don Chaffey
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Virginia Maskell (The Woman), Guy Doleman (Number Two), Paul Eddington (Cobb), George Baker (The New Number Two), Angelo Muscat (The Butler), Barbara Yu Ling (Taxi Driver), Stephanie Randall (Maid), Jack Allen (Doctor), Fabia Drake (Welfare worker), Denis Shaw (Shopkeeper), Oliver MacGreevy (Gardener/Electrician), Frederick Piper (Ex-Admiral), Patsy Smart (Waitress), Christopher Benjamin (Labour Exchange Manager), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), David Garfield (Hospital attendant), Peter Brace (1st Guardian), Keith Peacock (2nd Guardian)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Chimes of Big Ben

The PrisonerNumber Six watches with curiosity and suspicion as the Village welcomes a new resident whose background is almost too conveniently similar to his own. But Number Six finally admits to compassion when he steps forward to cooperate with Number Two to put a stop to his new neighbor’s torturous interrogation. When the two prisoners begin hatching an escape plan, can either of them truly trust the other – or are each of them testing the other?

written by Vincent Tilsley
directed by Don Chaffey
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Leo McKern (Number Two), Nadia Gray (Nadia), Finlay Currie (General), Richard Wattis (Fotheringay), Kevin Stoney (Colonel J), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), Christopher Benjamin (Number Two’s assistant), David Arlen (Karel), Hilda Barry (Number 38), Jack Le-White (Judge), John Maxim (Judge), Lucy Griffiths (Judge)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

A, B, and C

The PrisonerNumber Two and his interrogators embark on a new project to pry into Number Six’s dreams, hoping to find the events behind his resignation in his subconscious. Three individuals figure prominently in Number Six’s thoughts about his resignation, but before Number Two can discover their involvement, something unexpected will interrupt his attempt to eavesdrop on his prisoner’s dreams.

written by Anthony Skene
directed by Pat Jackson
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Colin Gordon (Number Two), Katherine Kath (Engladine), Sheila Allen (Number 14), Peter Bowles (A), Georgina Cookson (Blonde), Annette Carrell (B), Lucille Soong (Flower Girl), Bettine Le Beau (Maid), Terry Yorke (Thug), Peter Brayham (Thug), Bill Cummings (Henchman)

Original title: Play In Three Acts

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Free For All

The PrisonerNumber Six jumps at the opportunity to run for the office of Number Two, making individual freedom his campaign platform. The incumbent Number Two declares this approach to be against the laws of the Village, and Number Six is forced to endure a test for his suitability as a candidate. The test makes it possible for Number Six to win the election, but not in a way that he could imagine.

written by Paddy Fritz (a.k.a. Patrick McGoohan)
directed by Patrick McGoohan
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Eric Portman (Number Two), Rachel Herbert (Number 58), George Benson (Labour exchange manager), Harold Berens (Reporter), John Cazabon (Man in cave), Dene Cooper (Photographer), Kenneth Benda (Supervisor), Holly Doone (Waitress), Peter Brace (Mechanic), Alf Joint (Mechanic)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Schizoid Man

The PrisonerVillage officials enter Number Six’s residence in the dead of night, drugging him and taking him away. He is experimented on, injected with drugs, and awakens with a new face – or at least a new hairdo. Number Two tries to convince him that he is, in fact, Number Twelve – a deep cover agent assigned to break the will of the difficult Number Six. Number Six is unimpressed with this latest attempt to break him…until he returns to his residence and finds a man there with the number and the face that were once his own.

written by Terence Feely
directed by Pat Jackson
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Anton Rodgers (Number Two), Jane Merrow (Alison), Earl Cameron (Supervisor), Gay Cameron (Number 36), David Nettheim (Doctor), Pat Keen (Nurse), Gerry Crampton (Guardian), Dinney Powell (Guardian)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The General

The PrisonerWhen a new speed-learning lecture series takes the Village by storm, Number Six is immediately suspicious, and finds a like-minded ally in Number 12. Their skepticism is quickly proven to be correct when they learn that the speed-learning device uses subliminal messages – and that the hidden masterminds of the Village, not the Professor, control what information is subliminally fed to the population. Number Six discovers that the enigmatic General is behind the whole endeavour…but it may cost him dearly to find out any more than that.

written by Joshua Adam
directed by Peter Graham Scott
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Colin Gordon (Number Two), John Castle (Number 12), Betty McDowall (Professor’s wife), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), Conrad Phillips (Doctor), Michael Miller (Man in buggy), Keith Pyott (Waiter), Ian Fleming (Man at cafe), Normal Mitchell (Mechanic), Peter Bourne (Projection operator), George Leech (Guard), Jackie Cooper (Guard)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Many Happy Returns

The PrisonerNumber Six sees an opportunity to escape when he finds that the entire population of the Village has disappeared without a trace. He hitches a boat ride back to London, but finds himself in even worse trouble among a boatful of gun smugglers. Upon arriving in London, Number Six returns to his former employers and briefs them on the Village…only to discover that no one believes his story. He offers to find the Village for them to prove its existence, not suspecting that his return to his prison will be a one-way trip.

written by Anthony Skene
directed by Joseph Serf
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Donald Sinden (The Colonel), Patrick Cargill (Thorpe), Georgina Cookson (Mrs. Butterworth), Brian Worth (Group Captain), Richard Caldicott (Commander), Dennis Chinnery (Gunther), Jon Laurimore (Ernst), Nike Arrighi (Gypsy girl), Grace Arnold (Maid), Larry Taylor (Gypsy man)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Dance of the Dead

The PrisonerNumber Six spots a former co-worker trapped in the Village, only to find that the man is being tortured for information about him. Worse yet, Number Two informs Number Six that the man’s ordeal can be ended if only Six will reveal everything he knows. The new prisoner is broken quickly, while Number Six finds a possible means of summoning help – and finds himself on trial as well…

written by Anthony Skene
directed by Don Chaffey
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Mary Morris (Number Two), Duncan MacRae (Doctor), Norma West (The Observer), Bee Duffell (Psychiatrist), Alan White (Dutton), Aubrey Morris (Town crier), Camilla Hasse (Day supervisor), Michael Nightingale (Night supervisor), Patsy Smart (Night maid), Denise Buckley (Maid), George Merritt (Postman), John Frawley (Flower man), Lucy Griffiths (Lady in corridor), William Lyon Brown (Doctor)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Checkmate

The PrisonerNumber Six participates in a bizarre, life-size game of chess where people are the pieces – and Number Two is one of the players. Number Six believes he has found allies among the other pawns in the game, but one by one, they are gradually taken away from him – either literally, or through mind control. Number Six is left with only one co-conspirator – and when he escapes on his own, Number Six remains imprisoned in the Village.

written by Gerald Kelsey
directed by Don Chaffey
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Peter Wyngarde (Number Two), Ronald Radd (Rook), George Coulouris (Man with stick), Rosalie Crutchley (Queen), Patricia Jessel (Psychiatrist), Bee Duffell (Psychiatrist), Basil Dignam (Supervisor), Danvers Walker (Painter), Denis Shaw (Shopkeeper), Victor Platt (Assistant supervisor), Shivaun O’Casey (Nurse), Geoffrey Reed (Skipper), Terence Donovan (Sailor), Joe Dunne (Guard), Romo Gorrara (Guard)

Original title: The Queen’s Pawn

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Hammer Into Anvil

The PrisonerUnable to free himself from the Village, Number Six decides to begin tearing his prison apart from the inside out. He plays on Number Two’s paranoia with an elaborate scheme involving rumors that Number Six is actually a spy sent to the Village by Number Two’s superiors. Even Number Two’s most trusted aide is implicated by Number Six’s insinuations. Despite the fact that he is still stranded, Number Six scores a major victory when he brings his jailor to the brink of a total nervous breakdown.

written by Roger Woddis
directed by Pat Jackson
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Patrick Cargill (Number Two), Basil Hoskins (Number 14), Victor Maddern (Bandmaster), Norman Scace (Psychiatrist), Derek Aylward (New supervisor), Hilary Dwyer (Number 73), Arthur Gross (Control room operator), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), Victor Woolf (Shop assistant), Michael Segal (Technician), Margo Andrew (Girl), Susan Sheers (Code expert), Jackie Cooper (Guardian), Fred Haggerty (Guardian), Eddie Powell (Guardian), George Leach (Guardian)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

It’s Your Funeral

The PrisonerRumors abound that an assassination will take place in the Village – and despite the fact that he knows nothing about this plot, Number Six discovers that he is rumored to be a part of the scheme. Finding the man who is building the bomb to be used in the killing is a simple task, and he even confesses that Number Two is his target. But when Number Six goes to warn Number Two, he finds that there is more than one Number Two in the Village – and one could be trying to do away with the other.

written by Michael Cramoy
directed by Robert Asher
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Derren Nesbit (Number Two), Mark Eden (Number 100), Annette Andre (Watchmaker’s daughter), Andre Van Gyseghem (Retiring Number Two), Martin Miller (Watchmaker), Wanda Ventham (Computer attendant), Mark Burns (Number Two’s assistant), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), Charles Lloyd Pack (Artist), Grace Arnold (Number 36), Arthur White (Stall holder), Michael Bilton (Councillor), Gerry Crampton (Kosho opponent)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

A Change of Mind

The PrisonerOnce again, Number Six is subjected to a torturous session of brainwashing, but the process backfires, leaving him perfectly normal. In another plot to tear the Village apart from within, Number Six hypnotizes the woman who was used by Number Two to lure him into brainwashing. Number Six confuses his enemies by offering to repent and confess – and by planting a human time bomb in their midst. While this person poses no physical threat to Number Two, she does carry an important message that will turn the Village’s people against their dictator.

written by Roger Parkes
directed by Joseph Serf
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), John Sharpe (Number Two), Angela Brown (Number 86), George Pravda (Doctor), Kathleen Breck (Number 42), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), Thomas Heathcote (Lobo Man), Bartlett Mullins (Chairman), Michael Miller (Number 93), Joseph Cuby (Member of social group), June Ellis (Number 48), John Hamblin (Woodland man), Michael Billington (Woodland man)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling

The PrisonerNumber Six learns of a manhunt for a scientist who has perfected a means of transferring one subject’s mind to the body of another – a technology which the Village already possesses. When a foreign dignitary visits the Village, Number Six is forced to undergo the procedure, placing his knowledge and personality in the foreigner’s body, and is unleashed in the outside world on a mission to find the scientist. If Number Six fails in his assignment, he will never return to his own body.

written by Vincent Tilsley
directed by Pat Jackson
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Clifford Evans (Number Two), Nigel Stock (The Colonel), Zena Walker (Janet), Hugo Schuster (Seltzman), John Wentworth (Sir Charles), James Bree (Villiers), Lloyd Lamble (Stapleton), Patrick Jordan (Danvers), Lockwood West (Camera shop manager), Frederic Abbott (Potter), Gertan Klauber (Waiter), Henry Longhurst (Old guest), Danvers Walker (New man), John Nolan (Young guest)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Living in Harmony

The PrisonerNumber Six is subjected to an intense series of drug-induced hallucinations about a wild west saloon. Number Six is urged repeatedly to don the badge and revolver of the local sheriff, a job he refuses to take. But the choice is made painfully clear for him – if he does take the job, he will have to kill, and if he doesn’t, others will die. Even Number Six’s refusal to do exactly what is expected of him doesn’t save any lives this time.

written by David Tomblin
directed by David Tomblin
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), David Bauer (Judge), Alexis Kanner (Kid), Valerie French (Cathy), Gordon Tanner (Town Elder), Gordon Sterne (Bystander), Michael Balfour (Will), Larry Taylor (Mexican Sam), Monti de Lyle (Dignitary), Duglas Jone (Horse dealer), Bill Nick (Gunman), Les Crawford (Gunman), Frank Maher (Gunman), Max Faulkner (Horseman), Bill Cummings (Horseman), Eddie Eddon (Horseman)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Girl Who Was Death

The PrisonerNumber Six desperately tries to defuse a mad scientist’s attempt to launch a missile into the heart of London. But Number Six is also being pursued by the scientist’s daughter, who hatches a number of elaborate schemes to destroy him. Even if Number Six manages to foil the diabolical plot, he will still end up in the Village when it’s all over.

written by Terence Feely
directed by David Tomblin
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Kenneth Griffith (Schnipps), Justine Lord (Sonia), Christopher Benjamin (Potter), Michael Brennan (Killer Karminski), Harold Berens (Boxing M.C.), Sheena Marsh (Barmaid), Max Faulkner (Scots Napoleon), John Rees (Welsh Napoleon), Joe Gladwin (Yorkshire Napoleon), John Drake (Bowler), Gaynor Steward (Little girl), Graham Steward (Little boy), Stephen How (Little boy)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Once Upon A Time

The PrisonerNumber Two – actually one of the first men of that rank to interrogate Number Six – returns in a final desperate attempt to break his mind. Number Two forces Number Six through a brutal regression into his own childhood, but the prisoner still doesn’t break – and finally, his interrogator does. Number Six’s reward for surviving the encounter is, at long last, a confrontation with Number One.

written by Patrick McGoohan
directed by Patrick McGoohan
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Leo McKern (Number Two), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), John Cazabon (Umbrella man)

Original Title: Degree Absolute

Note: According to numerous sources, actor Leo McKern suffered a nervous breakdown during the production of this episode, citing the show’s intense content as the cause.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Fall Out

The PrisonerHaving triumphed against Number Two, Number Six is finally on his way – so he thinks – to meet Number One. But first, he has one more trial to undergo, though he can’t tell if he is the defendant…or the judge. The impetuous Number 48 is brought before him, held in contempt for his youthfully rebellious attitude. Number Two is miraculously brought back from the dead, though he seems unaware that his reign has ended. Number Six finally embarks on the final leg of his quest, but he is unprepared for the revelation that he may, in fact, already be Number One.

written by Patrick McGoohan
directed by Patrick McGoohan
music by Ron Grainer and Albert Elms

Cast: Patrick McGoohan (Number Six), Leo McKern (Number Two), Kenneth Griffith (President), Peter Swanwick (Supervisor), Michael Miller (Delegate), Alexis Kanner (Number 48)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Arrival

The Prisoner (2009 remake)A man wakes up in the desert, with only vague, fleeting memories of his previous life in New York City. He goes into hiding when he spots a hunting party in pursuit of an elderly man; he manages to reach the old man and help him to safety, but the old man is babbling something about 554 and the Village. When his younger rescuer reveals that doesn’t understand this, the old man says it’s a miracle… and dies.

The younger man, still unable to remember much of anything about his life before these events, wanders until he finds signs of civilizations: a grouping of mostly-identical homes. He has found the Village, but he quickly learns that no one who lives in the Village seems to acknowledge even the possibility that there are places beyond the Village. And he can find no escape himself – the Village seems to be surrounded on all sides by vast expanses of desert. Everyone living there has a number for a name, and this quickly leads the man to go looking for 554, who turns out to be a waitress at a diner. She knew the old man as 93, and he constantly talked of escaping the Village. Pursued by the hunting party from the desert, the man tries to make his escape, but is cornered and then wakes up in a hospital. Everyone there knows him as 6, but thanks to his scrambled memories, he can’t correct them with a real name. He only knows that he must escape the Village… and he quickly learns that the Village’s leader, a man known simply as 2, will do nearly anything to stop him.

written by Bill Gallagher
directed by Nick Hurran
music by Rupert Gregson-Williams

Cast: Ian McKellen (2), Jim Caviezel (6), Hayley Atwell (Lucy), Ruth Wilson (313), Lennie James (147), John Whitely (93), Rachael Blake (M2), Jamie Campbell Bower (11-12), Jessica Haines (554)

Notes: With the classic-series-style furniture and jacket, lava lamp and the drawing of Big Ben, 93 is strongly implied to be Number Six from the original series. (Nine minus three also equals six.) In an NPR interview, series star Jim Caviezel says that the intention was to have Patrick McGoohan play the role, but McGoohan, who died in January 2009 several months ahead of the new series’ premiere, was too ill to take part. Over the years, numerous revivals of the series had been mooted, including a big-screen revival starring Mel Gibson, and indeed even this revival of The Prisoner had been dead in the water at one point, with the original UK production partner balking at the expense involved. The original Prisoner has also inspired several shows directly, most notably Nowhere Man (1995-96) and Lost (2004-10), whose creators both admitted to being heavily influenced by McGoohan’s original series.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Harmony

The Prisoner (2009 remake)Having proven obstructive in a series of interrogation sessions thinly disguised as counseling, 6 is introduced to a man known as 16, who is supposedly his brother. Disturbingly, 16 seems to have photographic proof of this family connection, but 6 vehemently denies it: surely 2 has put 16 up to this charade for his own reasons. 16 tries to return 6 to the normalcy of his old job, driving the family-operated tour bus around the Village and for quick sightseeing tours into the desert. On one of these trips, 6 spots what appears to be a large boat anchor in the sand – evidence of a body of water whose existence everyone in the Village denies. One of his passengers is intrigued as well. 16 wins a trip to the legendary Escape Resort and invites 6 to join his family; while there, 16 reveals that he is not, in fact, 6’s brother, and decides to join 6 in his quest for a way out of the Village.

written by Bill Gallagher
directed by Nick Hurran
music by Rupert Gregson-Williams

Cast: Ian McKellen (2), Jim Caviezel (6), Hayley Atwell (Lucy), Ruth Wilson (313), Lennie James (147), Jeffrey R. Smith (16), Rachael Blake (M2), Jamie Campbell Bower (11-12), Jessica Haines (554), Warrick Grier (1955), James Cunningham (70), Leila Henriques (Winking Woman)

Notes: The new Prisoner episode titles hearken back to episodes of the original – in this case, the pointed anti-war western pastiche Living In Harmony – even though there may not necessarily be a direct story correlation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Anvil

The Prisoner (2009 remake)2 recruits 6 to join his legion of “undercovers” – Village residents who spy on other Village residents. The undercovers don’t try to determine if someone is guilty; they assume guilt and then try to find out what their subject is guilty of. 6 vows on the spot to find ways to turn this new assignment against 2, but even 6 is surprised when he learns about the culture of surveillance that exists within the borders of the Village: children are taught spying techniques, and virtually anyone could be a spy. 6 worries about the fate of the dreamers, Village residents who have inexplicably drawn sketches of such things as Big Ben and the Statue of Liberty. Anyone caught remembering the world outside the Village doesn’t have a long life expectancy; anyone caught associating with 6 may have an even shorter life.

written by Bill Gallagher
directed by Nick Hurran
music by Rupert Gregson-Williams

Cast: Ian McKellen (2), Jim Caviezel (6), Hayley Atwell (Lucy), Ruth Wilson (313), Lennie James (147), Jeffrey R. Smith (16), Rachael Blake (M2), Jamie Campbell Bower (11-12), Vincent Regan (909), Warrick Grier (1955)

Notes: The new Prisoner episode titles hearken back to episodes of the original – in this case, Hammer Into Anvil – even though there may not necessarily be a direct story correlation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Darling

The Prisoner (2009 remake)A gaping hole leading to nowhere has opened up in 147’s back yard. 6 is curious as to what caused it – the best explanation anyone seems to have is that it’s not the weather – and even wonders if it’s a mean of escaping the Village. At the same time, 6 is being pressured to take part in the Village’s matchmaking program, and while he’s skeptical at first, he’s stunned to find himself matched to a woman who he remembers encountering in New York City. Only now she’s blind, and has no memory of life before the Village – or of 6. One of 147’s children disappears into the hole while playing, never to emerge again. As it seems as though wedding bells may be ringing for 6, the hole may be ringing in the end of the Village.

written by Bill Gallagher
directed by Nick Hurran
music by Rupert Gregson-Williams

Cast: Ian McKellen (2), Jim Caviezel (6), Hayley Atwell (Lucy), Ruth Wilson (313), Lennie James (147), Jeffrey R. Smith (16), Rachael Blake (M2), Jamie Campbell Bower (11-12)

Notes: The new Prisoner episode titles hearken back to episodes of the original – in this case, Do Not Forsake Me, Oh My Darling – even though there may not necessarily be a direct story correlation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Schizoid

The Prisoner (2009 remake)6 discovers that someone who looks like him is stalking the Village. 313 says that 6 was in her apartment last night, and 147 claims that he and 6 got into a vicious argument. 6 even sees his double and tries to follow him, only to be cornered and attacked. His doppelganger urges him to follow the only course of action that will allow him to escape the Village: kill 2. A warning is issued by 2 that there is also a 2 impersonator on the loose, a disheveled man who looks like him but claims to have no number: one of the highest crimes possible in the Village. 2’s double and 6’s double are on a collision course. Or are they?

written by Bill Gallagher
directed by Nick Hurran
music by Rupert Gregson-Williams

Cast: Ian McKellen (2), Jim Caviezel (6), Hayley Atwell (Lucy), Ruth Wilson (313), Lennie James (147), Jeffrey R. Smith (16), Rachael Blake (M2), Jamie Campbell Bower (11-12)

Notes: The new Prisoner episode titles hearken back to episodes of the original – in this case, The Schizoid Man – even though there may not necessarily be a direct story correlation. That episode of the original Prisoner series proved to be memorable to writer Tracy Torme, who bestowed the same title upon one of his episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Checkmate

The Prisoner (2009 remake)6 is falling ill, and 313 confirms the grim diagnosis: something is slowly killing him. 147 tries to get him help, but 2 seems content to sit back and watch his adversary wither away as more new arrivals – who seem to have no idea that they came from outside the Village – roll in on a bus. But as 2 concentrates all of his time and energy on watching 6 die, his own family is wiped out, and the mysterious holes to nowhere continue opening in the ground. What happens to the Village when 2 doesn’t feel like being in charge anymore?

written by Bill Gallagher
directed by Nick Hurran
music by Rupert Gregson-Williams

Cast: Ian McKellen (2), Jim Caviezel (6), Hayley Atwell (Lucy), Ruth Wilson (313), Lennie James (147), Rachael Blake (M2), Jamie Campbell Bower (11-12), David Butler (Shopkeeper / Access Man), Renate Stuurman (21-16), Hanle Johanna Barnard (23-90), Leila Henriques (Curtis’ PA), Wolfgang Weissenstein (Butler)

Notes: The new Prisoner episode titles hearken back to episodes of the original – in this case, Checkmate – even though there may not necessarily be a direct story correlation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Departure and Arrival

The PrisonerAn agent of the British Foreign Office unexpectedly submits his resignation, setting off a panic among his superiors, who discovered that he is planning to flee the country and go to the Bahamas. Armed agents break into his home and abduct him, and when he awakens, he is in the Village, a gaily-colored, self-contained community whose residents seem to know nothing beyond its boundaries. No one seems to know who he is, and no one knows his name. A man identifying himself as Number Two introduces himself, and welcomes the newly-christened “Number Six” to his surveillance and control center, the Green Dome. The tools at his disposal for watching every moment of every life within the Village unfold is mind-boggling, with cameras, mobile phones, ubiquitous and even portable screens, and a kind of interconnected network tying it all together at Number Two’s fingertips. Number Two makes it clear that no one leaves the Village – and Number Six suspects that the penalty for doing so would be fatal. A former intelligence colleague of Number Six, Cobb, is also on the island, and mounts a valiant escape attempt, but he is captured by a deadly security device called Rover and taken to the Village’s hospital; not long afterward, Cobb is reported to have committed suicide, though Number Six immediately suspects something far more sinister. A chance meeting with a woman named Number Nine leads to another escape plan, but is Nine truly an ally and a fellow victim of the Village…or is she a trap?

written by Nicholas Briggs
directed by Nicholas Briggs
music by Jamie Robertson

Cast: Mark Elstob (Number Six), John Standing (Number Two), Celia Imrie (Number Two), Sara Powell (Number Nine), Helen Goldwyn (Village Voice), Sarah Mowat (ZERO-SIX-TWO), Jim Barclay (Control/Old Captain/Cobb), Barnaby Edwards (Number 34/Danvers/Butler)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Your Beautiful Village

The PrisonerNumber Six awakens to find his quarters in the Village – and indeed the entire Village itself – plunged into darkness. Phones and loudspeakers also seem to be on the fritz, and his attempts to contact Number Nine to check on her well-being are beset by blasts of radio frequency interference, dropped calls, and occasionally an almost unfathomable silence. Occasionally Number Two breaks through and claims that the entire Village is experiencing these problems and they need Number Six’s help. Refusing to give up, Number Six leaves his quarters in pitch blackness and tries to reach Number Nine, but is unable to do so. In addition to the darkness, Number Six finds that his memory of the Village’s layout isn’t as accurate as he thought. Number Two naturally wants to help Number Six reach his goal…and to help Number Six appreciate the beauty of the Village.

written by Nicholas Briggs
directed by Nicholas Briggs
music by Jamie Robertson

Cast: Mark Elstob (Number Six), Michael Cochrane (Number Two), Sara Powell (Number Nine), Helen Goldwyn (Village Voice), Sarah Mowat (ZERO-SIX-TWO)

Notes: Unlike the other three stories in the first Prisoner audio box set, Your Beautiful Village is a story original to Big Finish and not based on a previously filmed episode of the television series. The story deals with sensory deprivation torture, a subject that has been explored in such works as George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four”.

LogBook entry by Earl Green