Doctor WhoThe Doctor and Melanie land at a kind of toll booth in space, but instead of exact change, they wind up winning a trip to Earth in 1959 for being the ten billionth visitors to the station. Joining the chartered trip is Delta, queen of the Chimeron, and the last of her race who hasn’t been hunted down by genocidal Gavrok and his army of Bannermen. Gavrok’s forces trail the tourists to Wales, intent on killing Delta, who carries with her an egg that will soon hatch the first child in a new generation of Chimerons. Billy, a local boy with rock ‘n’ roll aspirations, falls in love with Delta, while the Doctor tries to prepare the Welsh locals for a mercenary attack from space.

Order the DVDwritten by Malcolm Kohll
directed by Chris Clough
music by Keff McCulloch

Guest Cast: Don Henderson (Gavrok), Belinda Mayne (Delta), David Kinder (Billy), Sara Griffiths (Ray), Richard Davies (Burton), Stubby Kaye (Weismuller), Morgan Deare (Hawk), Hugh Lloyd (Goronwy), Johnny Dennis (Murray), Anita Graham (Bollit), Ken Dodd (Tollmaster), Leslie Meadows (Adlon), Brian Hibbard (Keillor), Martyn Geraint (Vinny), Clive Condon (Callon), Richard Mitchley (Arrex), Robin Aspland, Keff McCulloch, Justin Myers, Ralph Salmins (The Lorells), Jessica McGough, Amy Osborn (Young Chimeron), Laura Collins, Carley Joseph (Chimeron Princess), Tracy Wilson, Jodie Wilson (Vocalists)

Broadcast from November 2 through 16, 1987

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green

Review: Though it’s probably the most deliberately, shamelessly goofy Doctor Who installment in the history of the series, I love Delta And The Bannermen. More than any other segment his first year in the role of the Doctor, Sylvester McCoy truly shines in this three-parter, especially in the scene where he magnificently confronts Gavrok, accusing him of genocide. It’s also the best use of Bonnie Langford’s Melanie, a character that never really developed any distinguishing features aside from her spunky attitude, a perfect match for this story. The guest stars are also notable, including American theater veteran Stubby Kaye, Sara Griffiths as the wistful Ray, and especially Don Henderson as Gavrok. Contributing a perfectly fitting 50’s style rock music score, complete with covers of several oldies, is Keff McCulloch, who also puts in a cameo appearance as a member of Billy’s band.

Some die-hard fans don’t like Delta And The Bannermen because it has a number of humorous elements and a rather simplistic love story, but those are among the very reasons that I do like it so much. Highly recommended, especially for those who want to initiate younger kids into the world of Doctor Who.