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True Or False Face

BatmanThe theft of foreign crown jewels from beneath the noses of Commissioner Gordon and Chief O’Hara signal the return of masked criminal mastermind False Face, who just as quickly gives Gotham’s finest the slip. Batman and Robin are summoned to ponder False Face’s latest cryptic clue, deducing that an armored car will be his next target, but it’s too late – False Face is already impersonating one of the truck’s guards, and escapes the hatch the next part of his scheme by kidnapping impersonating Chief O’Hara.

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Stephen Kandel
directed by William Graham
music by Nelson Riddle / Batman theme by Neal Hefti

BatmanCast: Adam West (Batman), Burt Ward (Robin), Alan Napier (Alfred), Neil Hamilton (Commissioner Gordon), Stafford Repp (Chief O’Hara), Madge Blake (Mrs. Cooper), Malachi Throne (False Face), Myrna Fahey (Blaze), Billy Curtis (Midget), Joe Brooks (Fat Man), Chuck Fox (Thin Man), S. John Launder (Mr. Ladd), Patrick White (Curator)

Notes: Holy Star Trek personnel crossover, Batman! Writer Stephen Kandel was the creator of Harry Mudd, the original Star Trek‘s sole Batmanrecurring adversary, though he had already completed his work on the early Trek episode Mudd’s Women by the time this episode of Batman premiered. Special guest star Malachi Throne – credited simply as “?” here – was a fixture of 1960s and ’70s TV, and of genre TV in general, appearing in both Star Trek and Star Trek: The Next Generation as well as Ark II and Babylon 5.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Holy Rat Race

BatmanWith Chief O’Hara in his clutches and the Caped Crusaders tied to the tracks in the path of an oncoming train, it seems that False Face has engineered the downfall of the Dynamic Duo. But a betrayal within the ranks of his hangers-on results in an about-face for Batman’s fortunes. Can someone as utterly scrupulous as Batman beat False Face at his own game of planting traps within traps?

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Stephen Kandel
directed by William Graham
music by Nelson Riddle / Batman theme by Neal Hefti

BatmanCast: Adam West (Batman), Burt Ward (Robin), Alan Napier (Alfred), Neil Hamilton (Commissioner Gordon), Stafford Repp (Chief O’Hara), Madge Blake (Mrs. Cooper), Malachi Throne (False Face), Myrna Fahey (Blaze), Billy Curtis (Midget), Joe Brooks (Fat Man), Chuck Fox (Thin Man), Gary Owens (TV Announcer), Mike Ragan (Cowboy)

Notes: Yes, that is the true face of famed radio and television announcer Gary BatmanOwens (1934-2016). Guest star Mike Ragan (1916-1995) began appearing in westerns about as soon as Hollywood started making them, with his first such credit in 1947’s Buffalo Bill Rides Again; his enormous list of TV credits includes The Adventures Of Wild Bill Hickok, The Roy Rogers Show, The Gene Autry Show, The Lone Ranger, Cheyenne, Wagon Train, The Life And Legend Of Wyatt Earp, Rawhide, and a dozen separate appearances on Bonanza. It is not until the end credits of this episode that Malachi Throne is credited with playing False Face.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Menagerie – Part I

Star Trek ClassicStardate 3012.4: The Enterprise is summoned to Starbase 6, apparently by Captain Pike, who commanded the ship before Kirk. Commodore Mendez shows Kirk, Spock and McCoy, however, that Pike was recently paralyzed in an accident and could not have signalled the Enterprise. Spock creates false messages from Kirk and sends them to the ship, instructing the crew that Spock and Pike will beam up immediately, the Enterprise will be piloted by computer to its next destination, and that Kirk will be staying behind. Kirk and Mendez follow the Enterprise in a shuttle, which runs out of fuel when Spock refuses to slow the Enterprise down so the shuttle can come aboard. Spock finally allows Kirk to catch up and then places himself under arrest. Kirk is unable to disconnect the computer from the helm, and Spock’s court-martial begins. Spock offers, as evidence, visual records of a voyage on the Enterprise on which Spock and Pike served 13 years earlier. The bridge then informs Kirk and Mendez that the recording is being sent to the Enterprise from Talos IV – a planet that, according to Starfleet regulations, is absolutely off-limits to all vessels, punishable by death.

Order this episode on DVDDownload this episode via Amazon's Unboxwritten by Gene Roddenberry
directed by Marc Daniels
footage from The Cage directed by Robert Butler
music by Alexander Courage

Guest Cast: DeForest Kelley (Dr. Leonard McCoy), James Doohan (Mr. Scott), George Takei (Lt. Sulu), Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura), Sean Kenney (Captain Pike), Malachi Throne (Commodore Mendez), Hagan Beggs (Ensign Hansen), Julie Parrish (Miss Piper)

Appearing in footage from The Cage: Jeffrey Hunter (Capt. Christopher Pike), Susan Oliver (Vina), Majel Leigh Hudec (Number One), Peter Duryea (Lt. Tyler), John Hoyt (Dr. Boyce), Meg Wylie (The Keeper), Adam Roarke (CPO Garrison)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Menagerie – Part II

Star Trek ClassicStardate 3013.1: Spock reveals that the Keeper of Talos IV has control of the viewscreen and the evidence being presented. The screen shows the events that occurred during Pike’s visit to Talos IV in great detail, but Spock has difficulty convincing Kirk and Mendez of the validity of what they are seeing as well as the tremendous power of the Talosians. When the evidence suddenly stops, Mendez orders Kirk and Pike, the ranking officers forming Spock’s trial board, to make their verdict, and all find Spock guilty. The final part of the record of Pike’s adventure then continues, and then Commodore Mendez vanishes from the Enterprise. The Keeper himself tells Kirk that the Mendez that accompanied him in the shuttle and the trial was an illusion projected from Talos IV, and that Pike is welcome to return to the planet and be restored, as Vina was, to his former strength and health.

Order this episode on DVDDownload this episode via Amazon's Unboxwritten by Gene Roddenberry
directed by Marc Daniels
footage from The Cage directed by Robert Butler
music by Alexander Courage

Guest Cast: DeForest Kelley (Dr. Leonard McCoy), James Doohan (Mr. Scott), George Takei (Lt. Sulu), Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura), Sean Kenney (Captain Pike), Malachi Throne (Commodore Mendez), Hagan Beggs (Ensign Hansen)

Appearing in footage from The Cage: Jeffrey Hunter (Capt. Christopher Pike), Susan Oliver (Vina), Majel Leigh Hudec (Number One), Peter Duryea (Lt. Tyler), John Hoyt (Dr. Boyce), Meg Wylie (The Keeper), Adam Roarke (CPO Garrison)

Notes: Both parts of The Menagerie used footage of the original series pilot The Cage as the visual evidence of Pike’s early mission; in truth, the framing story was hurriedly written by Gene Roddenberry and was designed to be shot quickly so the re-use of the already-produced (and already paid for) pilot episode could fill a critical gap in the schedule caused by production delays.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Bullet

SearchAfter an attempt to extract an eastern European weapons designer from behind the Iron Curtain fails, it falls to PROBE to help him defect and get him out alive, along with his designs and formulas for a poison-coated bullet that can kill a target even if it only grazes them. Lockwood ventures into enemy territory, and finds that his arrival has been anticipated. The defector whose life Lockwood means to save is killed, and when he himself is grazed by a bullet, Lockwood finds that the poisonous ammo is already in use in the eastern bloc.

written by Judy Burns
directed by William Wiard
music by Dominic Frontiere

SearchCast: Hugh O’Brian (Hugh Lockwood), Burgess Meredith (Cameron), Ina Balin (Alexia Trepov), Malachi Throne (Colonel Nobokov), Alan Bergman (Rolf Wentzel), Peter Von Zerneck (Bremer), Robert Boon (Balzak), Byron Mabe (Eagan), Genadii Biegouloff (Lieutenant), Stafford Morgan (Martin), Ron Castro (Carlos), Byron Chung (Kuroda), Amy Farrell (Murdock), Ginny Golden (Keach), Albert Popwell (Griffin), Walter Beakel (Harrison)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Flies

Ark IIIn the 25th century, centuries of human progress have taken their toll. Pollution and war have left the Earth a desolate wasteland. The scientific community, reduced to a small enclave hiding away from the scavengers and savages that roam the planet’s surface, puts all of its hopes into a mobile laboratory called Ark II, commanded by Jonah and crewed by young scientists Ruth and Samuel, and the sentient chimpanzee Adam.

Word reaches the Ark II crew of a marauding band of orphaned children pillaging weaker communities and preying on travelers. The only group in the area that wields more power is a group of well-armed warlords. Jonah ventures out on his own, discovering that an adult named Fagon is guiding the Flies, and he discovers something else even more disturbing: the Flies’ most recent looting “find” includes at least one canister of a poisonous gas. With the children willing to do whatever Fagon says, Jonah knows time is running out to keep the Flies from stepping up from petty crime to something far deadlier – to themselves and to the warlords.

The Flieswritten by Martin Roth
directed by Ted Post
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Jonathan Harris (Fagon),Tierre Turner (Tick), Malachi Throne (War Lord Brack), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: Filmation Associates, famous for its numerous early ’70s cartoons (including Star Trek: The Animated Series), took The Fliesa bold step into live-action SF with Ark II. The centerpiece and home base of the show was Ark II itself, a custom-built vehicle on an existing truck chassis; contrary to urban legend, Ark II was a new vehicle, and was not the same vehicle as the Landmaster from Damnation Alley. Another new vehicle making an appearance here was the very real jetpack, developed and then abandoned by Bell Helicopter, which wound up in the hands of a hi-tech Hollywood prop rental service. It could only fly for thirty seconds before its fuel ran out, sending its pilot (a costumed stuntman, not actor Terry Lester) plummeting to the ground on at least one occasion. The production rented the jetpack for only eight of these brief flights, each of which was filmed by four cameras at the same time, ensuring a variety of stock footage. Ark II’s smaller “convertible SUV” The Fliesvehicle was called the Roamer.

Actor Jonathan Harris – famous for his role as the villainous (but hardly competent) Dr. Smith on Lost In Space, is the episode’s main guest star, but Filmation would hire him as the adult star of their next live-action genre show, Space Academy (which later morphed into Jason Of Star Command). Malachi Throne (a veteran of ’60s and ’70s TV fondly remembered for his appearances in early episodes of Star Trek) also guest stars.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Ali Baba – Part 1

Electra Woman & Dyna GirlAs Electra Woman and Dyna Girl are covering an international gathering of influential scientists in their plain-clothes journalist alter egos, the diabolical criminal mastermind Ali Baba and his genie accomplice pluck an airplane out of the sky. That plane was carrying Professor Nabokov to the scientists’ conference, but Ali Baba wants the professor to hand over a formula that can change a person’s personality completely. When the two superheroines arrive to free the professor, Ali Baba uses the formula to turn Dyna Girl from Electra Woman’s greatest ally to her adversary.

written by Dick Robbins and Duane Poole
directed by Walter Miller
music not credited

Cast: Deidre Hall (Lori / Electra Woman), Judy Strangis (Judy / Dyna Girl), Norman Alden (Frank Heflin), Malachi Throne (Ali Baba), Sid Haig (The Genie), Ian Martin (Nabokov)

Electra Woman & Dyna GirlNotes: When you want flamboyant, exotic villainy, you want to cast Sid Haig. Perhaps best known for his stint as Dragos, the primary enemy of Jason Of Star Command, Haig has also appeared on Star Trek, Mission: Impossible, Batman, The Six Million Dollar Man, Buck Rogers In The 25th Century, Automan, and Sledge Hammer!, among countless others, with big screen roles in THX-1138, Diamonds Are Forever, Kill Bill Vol. 2, and more.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Ali Baba – Part 2

Electra Woman & Dyna GirlUnder the control of Professor Nabokov’s formula, Dyna Girl leads Ali Baba and his genie to Electra Woman’s secret headquarters, freezing Frank in the process. Electra Woman and Professor Nabokov escape from Ali Baba’s hideout and return to base, where they free Frank but discover that Dyna Girl is still in league with Ali Baba. Nabokov frantically tries to devise an antidote to his own formula, even as Ali Baba and Dyna Girl plan to use that formula to turn Electra Woman to a life of crime.

written by Dick Robbins and Duane Poole
directed by Walter Miller
music not credited

Electra Woman & Dyna GirlCast: Deidre Hall (Lori / Electra Woman), Judy Strangis (Judy / Dyna Girl), Norman Alden (Frank Heflin), Malachi Throne (Ali Baba), Sid Haig (The Genie), Ian Martin (Nabokov), Marvin Miller (Narrator)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Mind Group

Ark IIActing on information that three children with unusual telepathic powers have gone missing from a nearby village, Ark II ventures into dangerous territory. Jonah brings the vehicle to a stop when all of the members of his crew hear one of the children talk in their minds. (Just to be sure, Adam looks under the table, but doesn’t find anyone there.) The children have been capture by Warlord Brack, someone who Jonah knows all too well from a previous encounter. One of the children escapes and Jonah takes him back to the Ark, where Ruth learns that the children have powers of telekinesis as well as telepathy. Brack lies to his remaining captives, convincing them that the Ark II crew are even worse than he is. After Samuel, Adam and Jonah take the Roamer to look for the other children, Ruth finds herself in trouble, and trusting in the children’s telekinetic abilities is her only hope.

The Flieswritten by Robert Specht
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael and Horta-Mahana

Cast: Terry Lester (Jonah), Jean Marie Hon (Ruth), Jose Flores (Samuel), Malachi Throne (War Lord Brack), Johnny Avery (Aaron), Dawn Lyn (Bina), Billy Simpson (Caleb), Lou Scheimer (voice of Adam)

Notes: A valuable lesson from this episode – telepaths can always talk with their mouths full. For once, a science fiction series manages to not treat a force field as a miraculously selective porous surface: the whole complication of the plot is that there’s limited air in the space inside the force field. Brack was last encountered in the series pilot, The Flies, alongside the only other recurring characters in the series, Fagon and Tick (who reappeared in The Drought).

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Empire Strikes Back

The Adventures Of Luke Skywalker: The Empire Strikes BackIn the latest installment of the Adventures of Luke Skywalker, Luke and his fellow Rebels are on the run from the Empire following the destruction of the Death Star. With Ben Kenobi gone, Luke has nowhere to turn for more Jedi training, until he sees an apparition of Ben on the ice planet Hoth, instructing him to seek out Dagobah and Yoda, the last of the Jedi Masters. Leia and Han, in the meantime, escape an Imperial attack on Hoth and, after a near-suicidal dash through an asteroid belt in the Millennium Falcon, seek help from Han’s old friend (and fellow scoundrel) Lando Calrissian. Luke goes to Dagobah, meets Yoda and begins his training, finding that the path to becoming a Jedi Knight is anything but easy. When Luke uses the Force and sees a vision of Leia and Han in trouble, he leaves Yoda to help his friends, unaware that Darth Vader is waiting for all of them.

LogBook entry and TheatEar review by Earl Green Read More

Unification I

Star Trek: The Next GenerationStardate 45233.1: One of the Federation’s most valued advisors, Spock, has been seen on Romulus. Picard is assigned to go to Romulus undercover and find out if Spock has defected from the Federation. The Enterprise goes to Vulcan, where Picard visits Sarek, and Riker investigates the recovered wreckage of a Vulcan ship. Sarek, near death, suggests that Spock may have gone to visit Pardek, a Romulan peace advocate Spock met at the Khitomer peace conference decades ago. The next stop is the Klingon planet, where Picard borrows a cloaked ship to cross the Neutral Zone. Picard and Data, equipped with disguises, head for Romulus. Federation shipyard operator Dokachen assists Riker in the wreckage investigation. They find an unidentified ship receiving supplies from the shipyard without authorization. The ship fires at the Enterprise, which fires back at minimum power – yet the other vessel explodes. Data and Picard, having just received news of Sarek’s death, beam to Romulus and find Pardek, but before they can follow him, guards stop them and lead them to Pardek…and they discover that Spock is indeed alive and well on Romulus.

Order the DVDsteleplay by Jeri Taylor
story by Rick Berman and Michael Piller
directed by Les Landau
music by Dennis McCarthy

Guest Cast: Leonard Nimoy (Spock), Mark Lenard (Sarek), Joanna Miles (Perrin), Stephen Root (Neral), Graham Jarvis (Dokachen), Malachi Throne (Pardek), Norman Large (Captain K’vada), Daniel Roebuck (Jaron), Erick Avari (B’ijik), Karen Hensel (Admiral Brackett), Mimi Cozzens (Soup Woman), Majel Barrett (Computer Voice)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Unification II

Star Trek: The Next GenerationStardate 45245.8: Spock is promoting the idea of reunification of Romulus and Vulcan. Pardek gains Spock an audience with the Proconsul, Neral, who says he will endorse reunification. Picard is skeptical, to the annoyance of Spock, who thinks Picard’s impression of him has been colored by Sarek. Neral is plotting with Sela to invade Vulcan with stolen Vulcan ships in the guise of a peace envoy and escorts. Riker gets the truth about the vessel destroyed in the shipyard out of the Ferengi accomplice of the ship’s pilot. An intact Vulcan ship was to be delivered to the Neutral Zone border to Romulans for the invasion fleet. Picard, Spock and Data are taken prisoner when betrayed by Pardek. Sela prepares a hologram of Spock to read a statement about the peaceful mission of the Romulans. When Sela leaves to see the ships off, Data and Spock program the hologram to warn the Federation. The Enterprise intercepts the ships, but a Romulan Warbird destroys the Vulcan ships instead of allowing any evidence to remain of the invasion plot. Picard, Data and Spock escape, and rejoin Spock’s Romulan followers in a new hiding place. Spock insists on staying so that he may continue to influence opinions on Romulus, even if only on a small scale.

Order the DVDsteleplay by Michael Piller
story by Rick Berman and Michael Piller
directed by Cliff Bole
music by Dennis McCarthy

Guest Cast: Leonard Nimoy (Spock), Denise Crosby (Sela), Stephen Root (Neral), Malachi Throne (Pardek), Norman Large (Captain K’vada), Daniel Roebuck (Jaron), William Bastiani (Omag), Susan Fallender (Shalote), Vidal Peterson (D’Tan), Harriet Leider (Amarie)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Coming of Shadows

Babylon 5When the Emperor of the Centauri decides to pay a surprise visit to B5, G’Kar decides to assassinate him. And he’s not the only one with designs on the throne. Refa, a power-hungry associate of Londo’s, wants Londo to deliver an address that will decry the Emperor’s politics, a speech which will be remembered after the Emperor’s death, already planned by Refa and his backers. But before the Emperor can even be touched by either party, he falls ill for the final time. In medlab, he entrusts Franklin to deliver a pledge of peace to G’Kar. Meanwhile, Refa panics, fearing that a competing assassin has struck first. Londo offers to summon the Shadows to conquer a Narn colony in quadrant 14, and Refa sends a flotilla of Centauri warships to claim the territory. Arriving Narn ships are shot down by the Centauri, and the Narn respond by declaring war on the Centauri. And it is revealed – though only to Garibaldi – that Sinclair is on Minbar, preparing for the coming of the Shadows. His warning, though it cannot be revealed to anyone else is to beware…and stay close to the Vorlon.

Order now!Download this episodewritten by J. Michael Straczynski
directed by Janet Greek
music by
Christopher Franke

Guest Cast: Michael O’ Hare (Ambassador Jeffrey Sinclair), Fredric Lehne (Ranger), Malachi Throne (Centauri Prime Minister), Jeff Conaway (Zack Allen), William Forward (Refa), Turhan Bey (Centauri Emperor), Neil Bradley (Kha’Mak), Ardwight Chamberlain (Kosh), Jonathan Chapman (Narn Pilot #2), Bryan Michael McGuire (Customs Guard #1), Kim Strauss (Narn Pilot #1)

John Copeland, Douglas Netter and J. Michael StraczynskiNote: This episode won the Science Fiction Society’s Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation in 1996, beating out the films Toy Story, Apollo 13 and 12 Monkeys and the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode The Visitor. This was the first Hugo awarded to a television series other than Star Trek (or one of its spinoffs) or Twilight Zone, and only the seventh Hugo to be given to a television series in 43 years of the Best Dramatic Presentation category.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

In Harm’s Way

Star Trek: Phase II

This is an episode of a fan-made series whose storyline may be invalidated by later official studio productions.

The Enterprise, under the command of Captain Christopher Pike, is destroyed with all hands by a Doomsday Machine, which has somehow found its way into the past.

Stardate not given: The starship Farragut, commanded by Captain James T. Kirk, is summoned to the planet of the Guardian of Forever, where Spock, a Vulcan (a species thought to have been rendered extinct in the 16-year war with the Doomsday Machines) in Starfleet uniform, tries to convince Kirk, Dr. McCoy and their Klingon science officer Kargh that history has been altered. Kirk and his officers are extremely skeptical of Spock’s explanation of how he alone escaped the effects of the changes to the timeline, but he is able to back up his claims with purely scientific evidence. Kirk, Spock and McCoy track the disturbance in history back to Earth on the early 21st century, traveling there via the Guardian and discovering that Commodore Decker – presumed to have been killed in action against the Doomsday Machines – was in fact thrown back in time in his shuttlecraft. He lived out his life in the late 20th century and died of old age, but not before videotaping a message for Kirk and his crew, trying to explain what went wrong.

Watch Itstory by Max Rem (a.k.a. Doug Drexler) and Erik Korngold
screenplay by Erik Korngold
with respectful acknolwedgement to Norman Spinrad and Harlan Ellison
directed by Jack Marshall
music tracked from original episodes / movies

Cast: James Cawley (Kirk), Jeffery Quinn (Spock), John Kelley (McCoy), Charles Root (Scott), Julienne Irons (Uhura), Meghan King Johnson (Rand), Ron Boyd (DeSalle), Shannon Quinlan (Number One / Chapel), Jay Storey (Kyle), William Windom (Commodore Decker), BarBara Luna (Veronica), Malachi Throne (Korogh), Becky Bonar (MacGregor), John Carrigan (Kargh), Simon Judas Raye (Guardian’s Voice), Kurt Carley (Captain Pike), James Larson (Jose Tyler), Charles Holloway (Dr. Boyce), Rose Montessano (Com Officer), Tim Giles (Engineer), Leslie Hoffman, Pearl Marshall, Jeff Mailhotte, Robert Mills, Randy Davis, Mike Magin, Jessica Mailhotte, Ed Abbate, Brian Hudon, Doug Hutchings, Patrick Bell, John Lim, Timothy Sheffield, Chris Lunderman, Jerry Yuen (Starfleet Personnel)

Review: The second outing for New Voyages, In Harm’s Way is entertaining enough if you’re a fan, but even then it seems like an exercise in throwing in Everything Plus Two Kitchen Sinks. As much as I enjoy the output of the New Voyages cast and crew, it’s always mystified me why Come What May was relegated to “pilot” status and withdrawn from the official site as a download – because in some ways, I regard this as the most extraneous New Voyage that has seen the light of day so far. Read More