Pyramids of Mars

Doctor WhoIn 1910, Egyptologist Marcus Scarman makes his greatest find ever – a crypt said to be the tomb of the god Sutekh. It is also Scarman’s last find. His life as he has known it ends and his body becomes an obedient servant to the still very-much-alive Egyptian god Sutekh, in fact an alien consciousness trapped on Earth.

The TARDIS brings the Doctor and Sarah to Britain that same year, after a close call in the time vortex and the appearance of Sutekh’s face in the console room – a psychic breach of the time machine’s most important defenses. The Doctor follows the source of the interference to Scarman’s mansion, where strange things are afoot – including the shadowy appearance of walking mummies. With Scarman’s brother Lawrence in tow, the Doctor and Sarah stumble upon the force behind the unusual happenings: Sutekh is planning a strike, from Earth, against a mechanism on the surface of Mars which hold him captive on Earth. Even the primitive state of rocketry isn’t holding Sutekh’s effort back: he’s lending Scarman and his robot mummies advanced technology. Sutekh hopes to dominate the Earth with his immense willpower and then take revenge upon his fellow Osirans on Mars – even if it means wiping out the human race to avenge his centuries of captivity.

Order the DVDDownload this episodewritten by Lewis Griefer (a.k.a. Robert Holmes)
directed by Paddy Russell
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Bernard Archard (Professor Macrus Scarman), Vik Tabian (Ahmed), Peter Mayock (Namin), Michael Bilton (Collins), Peter Copley (Dr. Warlock), Michael Sheard (Laurence Scarman), George Tovey (Ernie Clements), Gabriel Woolf (Sutekh / voice of Horus), Nick Burnell, Melvyn Bedford, Kevin Selway (Mummies)

Broadcast from October 25 through November 15, 1975

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green Read More

Dangerous Game

Far-Out Space NutsA strange space vortex appears in the path of the lander, and when Barney and Junior investigate, a werewolf-like creature boards their spaceship. They are taken to Salana, a woman who tells them they will compete in games and play to win…or face spending eternity as her living trophies. Her wolf-like minions, Lycos and Lobos, are free to pursue them and ensure that they are not victorious. And simply not playing, as Junior suggests, isn’t an option.

teleplay by Sam Locke and Paul Roberts
story by Duane Poole and Dick Robbins
directed by Al Schwartz
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), John Caisse (Lobos), Lynn Cartwright (Salana), Mickey Morton (Lycos)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Mission Of The Darians

Space: 1999An advanced spacecraft identifying itself as the Daria drifts close to the Moon, sending out a distress signal requesting medical and technical help. Commander Koenig leads a rescue mission to the Daria, but when the Eagle from Moonbase Alpha is in close proximity to the Daria, the smaller ship’s systems are overpowered and it is drawn inside and docked to the Daria. As the Alpha crew explore the devastated interior of the ship, they encounter several dwarf-like beings, but Koenig and Bergman are overcome by taller, spacesuited guards. And yet a third group seems to make itself frighteningly apparent when a large, burly man attacks the guard accompanying Dr. Russell. When Koenig regains consciousness after being stunned, a woman named Kara explains that the city-ship has been overrun by primitives. Dr. Russell witnesses the primitives’ society first-hand when she is forced to watch as first one of the dwarves, and then her own security guard, are executed for being declared mutants by one of the larger beings. Her relief is short-lived when she learns that the primitives have been seeking a perfect victim for sacrifice to their god, Neman. Neman is also the name of Daria’s captain, who proposes an alliance with Koenig. Daria is a generational ship, launched hundreds of years ago, which is now closing in on its destination – a world that the Alphans could share with the Darians. But are the humans, whether from Moonbase Alpha or from the lower decks of Daria itself, being invited to be the Darians’ neighbors…or their food source?

Order the DVDswritten by Johnny Byrne
directed by Ray Austin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Joan Collins (Kara), Dennis Burgess (Neman), Aubrey Morris (Darian), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Paul Antrim (Lowry), Robert Russell (Hadin), Gerald Stadden (Male Mute), Jackie Horton (Female Mute)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Go Directly To Jail

The Invisible ManThe Klae Corporation’s cleaning lady begs the Westins for help: her son has been arrested in Texas on drug charges, despite never having had any prior offenses. Against Walter’s wishes, the Westins set out to see what they can find out, discovering that she’s telling the truth…as far as she knows it. Her son is a federal agent working undercover to bring down a heroin smuggling operation run from the prison warden’s office…and by going undercover (and invisible) to investigate, Daniel may blow the agent’s cover.

written by Steven Bochco
directed by Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), James McEachin (Leland McCallister), Pat Harrington (Warden), John Crawford (Coner), Gregory Walcott (Police Officer), Pauline Myers (Mrs. McCallister), Eric Mason (Senor Robles), Ed Call (1st Prisoner), Gus Peters (2nd Prisoner), Tony B. Burton (3rd Prisoner), George “Buck” Flower (Bunker Guard), Nicholas Worth (Guard with shoes), Jason Johnson (Farmer)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Secrets Of The Hexagon

Far-Out Space NutsWhen Barney accuses Junior yet again of being a useless idiot, Junior is vulnerable to the new intergalactic con man who offers him the ability to turn his fortunes around. But this scam artist isn’t selling space snake oil: he’s offering something called the Hexagon, which can fulfill nearly any wish its owner desires. And the asking price? The space travelers’ lander. When Barney and Junior discover that they’ve been had, the race is on to out-scam the scammer.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Rudy Diaz (voice of the Hexagon), Howard George (Flam), Gus Peters (Tride), Hal Smith (Komak)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Black Sun

Space: 1999A large but harmless asteroid is detected, but its course won’t even bring it close to the moon – until it suddenly changes direction and heads straight for the moon, coming close enough to extert tidal gravity on Moonbase Alpha itself before diverting again and exploding. The cause of the unusual gravity influence is discovered: a black hole close enough to divert even the moon from its path. With only three days left until the moon is swallowed, Professor Bergman devises a force field that could theoretically repel the immense gravitational stresses…but as a backup plan, Koenig has one Eagle stocked up with supplies and ready to ferry six people to safety as a lifeboat. And as the moon draws closer to the black hole, it begins to look as though the lifeboat plan offers the only chance of survival for anyone.

Order the DVDswritten by David Weir
directed by Lee H. Katzin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Paul Jones (Mike Ryan), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Jon Laurimore (Smitty)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The New Original Wonder Woman

Wonder WomanArmy Air Forces flying ace Major Steve Trevor sets off to intercept an experimental German plane at the height of World War II in 1942. The Allies have received intelligence that the Nazis have built a trans-Atlantic bomber capable of attacking American soil, and Major Trevor must either confirm and engage, or disprove and return to base. The rumors are true, but Trevor takes out the enemy by colliding with it. As the two pilots bail out via parachute, the Nazi pilot shoots Trevor…and then himself plummets into shark-infested water. Trevor’s parachute drifts over land, bringing him down safely to an uncharted island in the Bermuda Triangle.

The island is inhabited by an isolated tribe of Amazon women who have chosen to remain apart from the rest of humanity, and certainly apart from the war consuming the rest of the world. Diana, the daughter of Queen Hippolyta, is fascinated by the man in her tribe’s midst, but her mother forbids her to interfere in his destiny. Any Amazon who takes Major Trevor back to America can never return, and may surrender the near-immortality enjoyed by the Amazons remaining on Paradise Island; Hippolyta decides that tests of athleticism and endurance will determine who is best suited for this one-way mission. Diana assumes a disguise and wins the competition, only revealing her identity to her mother at the end. In her invisible plane, and with a new outfit made of a material impervious to primitive weaponry, Diana sets out to return Major Trevor to Washington. But once she begins her new life, her incredible abilities draw attention from all kinds of people…including a cadre of Nazi sympathizers operating within American borders. Worse yet, the experimental Nazi plane wasn’t the only one of its kind…

Download this episode via Amazonwritten by Stanley Ralph Ross
directed by Leonard Horn
music by Charles Fox

Wonder WomanCast: Lynda Carter (Diana Prince / Wonder Woman), Lyle Waggoner (Major Steve Trevor), John Randolph (General Blankenship), Red Buttons (Ashley Norman), Stella Stevens (Marcia), Eric Braeden (Captain Drangel), Severn Darden (Bad Guy), Fannie Flagg (Amazon Doctor), Henry Gibson (Nikolas), Kenneth Mars (Colonel Von Blasko), Cloris Leachman (Queen Hippolyta), Helen Verbit (Nurse), Tom Rosqui (Cop #2), Fritzi Burr (Saleslady), Ian Wolfe (Bank Manager), Inga Neilson (Rena), Maida Severn (Teutonic Woman), Jean Karlson (2nd Amazon), Anne Ramsey (Taxi Cab Driver)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Captain Torque Space Pirate

Far-Out Space NutsCaptain Torque’s attempts to find an intergalactic treasure map have proven far too dangerous for his inept henchmen. He decides to enlist the help of the next two fools he happens across, and naturally Barney and Junior are the easiest choices. To ensure their cooperation, captain Torque holds their spaceship hostage…with no guarantee that he’ll give it back even if they do accomplish the mission he has given them.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Walter G. Miller
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Rudy Diaz (Captain Torque), Gus Peters (Henchman), Hal Smith (Intergalactic Patrol)

Notes: Many online resources place a comma in this episode’s title; the on-air title as broadcast contains no punctuation. Junior accidentally calls Captain Torque “Captain Turk” numerous times.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Guardian Of Piri

Space: 1999The moon nears a colorful planet, but Moonbase Alpha’s scanners can’t indicate whether or not the planet sustains life. An Eagle is dispatched to investigate, and the two pilots aboard make a remarkable find – a “forest” of spherical shapes. When they begin flying recklessly among the spheres, exhibitng almost intoxicated behavior, Carter furiously orders the pilots to return to the moon – and then contact is lost. Carter blames the incident – and presumably the death of two pilots – on a rapid-fire series of computer failures on Moonbase Alpha. As the head of the moonbase’s computer division, Kano is at a loss to explain, and the failures continue: a patient dies during a routine (but computer-supervised) blood transfusion, and computer-maintained life support drops the oxygen level within the moonbase (causing Bergman’s artificial heart to fail momentarily). A second excursion, in an Eagle with no computer control, reveals that the first Eagle didn’t crash – it’s suspended in mid-air above the planet’s surface. To find the source of the computer glitches, Kano interfaces himself with the moonbase’s mainframe via an implanted connection, but he vanishes before Dr. Russell’s eyes. Koenig and Alan Carter visit the planet for themselves, where Koenig finds Kano and the missing pilots. They can’t tell him what’s happened – until a beautiful woman appears, offering Koenig and the other humans eternal happiness. All they need to do is pledge their loyalty to the Guardian of the planet Piri. Koenig refuses, and when he returns to the Eagle, finds that Alan has received a visit from the woman as well – and he seems to have accepted her offer. It also seems that the rest of Koenig’s crew has accepted the invitation from Piri, as he discovers when he returns.

Order the DVDswriter not credited
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Catherine Schell (The Woman), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Michael Culver (Pete Irving)

Notes: Technically, Christopher Penfold is credited only as the story consultant, and no writer is actually credited for this episode. However, it’s worth noting that Kano’s human-computer interface is very similar conceptually – right down to the plug-in jack implanted into the back of his head – to Crewman Maddox’s computer connection in the 1984 Doctor Who story Warriors Of The Deep, which was written by Space: 1999 veteran Johnny Byrne. Actress Catherine Schell would join the show’s regular cast in season two, although in a very different role.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Vanishing Alien Mystery

Far-Out Space NutsA meteor storm forces Barney, Junior and Honk down on a derelict space station. They find that Lantana has also docked there, as have many others, for the reading of a space will. The deceased promises his entire fortune, including the station itself, to all present, and implores them to ignore legends that the station is haunted. But when the visitors to the station begin disappearing, one by one, it looks like someone wants to be the sole surviving benefactor of that space will…

written by Jack Mendelsohn
directed by Wes Kenney
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Eve Bruce (Lantana), Mitchell Young-Evans (Spector), Michael Hawes (Zomar), Stan Jenson (Crakor)

Notes: Possibly the only instance of anything resembling continuity in Far-Out Space Nuts, this episode features a Gromek (It’s All In Your Mind), a Pippet (Flight Of The Pippets, a Crystallite (The Crystallites), and Lantana herself (The Robots Of Pod).

LogBook entry by Earl Green

End Of Eternity

Space: 1999The moon passes an asteroid which shows signs of something unusual beneath its surface. Using explosive charges, an expedition led by Koenig and Professor Bergman unearths a door of artificial origins. An attempt to open a door further inside the underground installation results in a huge explosion, and while the second door opens, someone who was standing behind it is critically injured. Koenig and his landing party return the humanoid to Moonbase Alpha, where he dies on the operating table. And yet, when Dr. Russell prepares to conduct an autopsy, she finds that the humanoid is unharmed – in fact, his body is regenerating. Before long, the fully-restored alien visitor is on his own two feet again, exploring the Moonbase, despite security’s best efforts to restrain him. Though he expresses his gratitude to Koenig for freeing him from the asteroid, the entity known as Balor soon all but takes over Moonbase Alpha in a display of power and pure evil.

Order the DVDswritten by Johnny Byrne
directed by Ray Austin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Peter Bowles (Balor), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Jim Smilie (Baxter)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Android Invasion

Doctor WhoThe Doctor and Sarah arrive near a village that Sarah recognizes as Devesham,but it’s immediately apparent that something is very wrong. Spacesuited robot guards patrol the countryside, firing guns built into their fingers at any intruders they see (including the time travelers), and they watch helplessly as a UNIT soldier bolts straight toward a cliff, and over the edge to his death. And yet he shows up later at the village pub, alive and well – and zombielike, until the clock strikes a certain hour. The Doctor has theories about the strange behavior, but nothing accounts for all of the variables until he realizes he’s not on Earth. Sarah is captured by androids disguised as UNIT troops, and taken to a ship manned by Kraal invaders, who have copied everyone from the villagers to Harry Sullivan as part of their plan to take over Earth.

Download this episodewritten by Terry Nation
directed by Barry Letts
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Ian Marter (Harry Sullivan), John Levene (RSM Benton), Martin Friend (Styggron), Roy Skelton (Chedaki), Max Faulkner (Adams), Peter Welch (Morgan), Milton Johns (Guy Crayford), Stuart Fell (Kraal), Patrick Newell (Faraday), Dave Carter (Grierson), Heather Emmanuel (Tessa), Hugh Lund (Matthews)

Broadcast from November 22 through December 13, 1975

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green Read More

Episode One

The Legend Of Robin HoodEngland, before the Crusades: the Earl of Huntingdon entrusts his infant son to his close friends and allies, Sir Cedric and Father Ambrose. As his only heir, the child will be in danger. When the boy is of age, he is to be told of his true identity, and instructed to claim his inheritance. Until then, he is to live the life of a commoner.

The boy, Robin, is brought up and well-educated, especially for the son of the King’s forester, John Hood. But it’s not until after he’s already developed a taste for standing up to the landed gentry that Robin learns that he, too, is of noble blood. With his late father’s ring, and proof of his identity, Robin Hood heads to London to claim his birthright. Along the way, he assists an entourage led by Sir Kenneth Neston, who is taking his niece, Marion, to marry Sir Guy of Gisbourne – one of Robin’s least favorite people, due to the cruelty with which he treats those under his rule. Robin arrives in London and proves his identity to King Richard, who welcomes him as the rightful Earl of Huntingdon. Robin’s true identity is a problem for some of Sir Guy’s allies, including the Sheriff of Nottingham. Together, Sir Guy and the Sheriff are planning to manipulate Prince John in the event that he ascends to Prince Regent in his brother’s upcoming absence to lead the Crusades from the front in the Holy Land. And as Robin rides alone toward the Huntingdon estate, other men lie in wait for him…

written by Alistair Bell
directed by Eric Davidson
music by Stanley Myers

The Legend of Robin HoodCast: Martin Potter (Robin Hood), Diane Keen (Lady Marion), John Abineri (Sir Kenneth Neston), William Marlowe (Sir Guy of Gisbourne), Paul Darrow (Sheriff of Nottingham), Michael-John Jackson (Richard I), David Dixon (Prince John), David Ryall (Abbot of Grantham), Geoffrey Russell (Longchamp), Miles Anderson (Will Scarlet), Stephen Whittaker (Ralph Gammon), Anthony Garner (Earl of Huntingdon), Michael Fleming (Sir Cedric Usher), David King (Father Ambrose), Trevor Griffiths (John Hood), Geoffrey Greenhill (Norman Soldier), John Caesar (Norman Soldier), Geoffrey Jackman (Landlord), Tony Doyle (Norman Sergeant), Sheelah Wilcocks (Old Woman), Robert Russell (Robber Chief), Martin Duncan (Blondin)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Stop When Red Lights Flash

The Invisible ManPassing through the small town of Docker Junction en route to an assignment, the Westins pull up behind a parked and apparently abandoned school bus whose red lights are nonetheless flashing. After confirming that no one is in or near the bus, Daniel drives around it, only to be given a ticket for doing so. Appearing in court that afternoon, Daniel balks at the exorbitant fine announced by the city judge, and grows suspicious when he discovers that the fine can be paid in cash only – no checks. Daniel doesn’t have that kind of cash on him, and he and Kate are promptly thrown in jail; he uses his one phone call to summon help from Walter Carlson at the Klae Institute. Worse yet, the police check the Westins’ vehicle for any signs of “contraband” that could result in an even higher fine, and they discover Daniel’s supply of faces and hands. Is the invisible man’s cover about to be blown by a small-town rigged court scam?

written by Seeleg Lester
directed by Gene Nelson
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Roger C. Carmel (Judge Jones), Scott Brady (Sheriff Bentley), Frank Aletter (Charles Hooten), Eddie Firestone (Town Lush), Ted Hartley (Craig), Dean Santoro (Benoit), Kasey Rogers (Gert), Pearl Shear (Ethel), Harold Ayer (Jeb), John Furlong (Riley), Donald Elson (Compositor), Kristin Larkin (The Girl)

Notes: Roger C. Carmel is a face well known to Star Trek fans for repeatedly playing interplanetary con man Harry Mudd, a character who had the rare distinction of appearing in both the live action and animated versions of Star Trek.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Alien Lover

StarstruckAfter becoming orphaned and spending three months in a mental institution, Susan arrives at her aunt and uncle’s home to move in with them. Her Uncle Mike is only too pleased to be receiving a slice of Susan’s inheritance to pay her expenses, and when Susan begins mentioning that she’s having conversations with someone named Marc through a television set, Mike sees an opportunity to have Susan committed and legally gain full access to that inheritance. Mike and Marian’s son, Jude, comes home from college with his roommate for a visit, and Susan learns that Jude has seen and spoken to Marc as well – and that he’s scared to death of the handsome man on the TV. Lonely and lovesick, Susan refuses to accept Jude’s disturbing warning that Marc is the leader of an alien invasion force…but if her crush finds a way to step out of the TV, it could be the beginning of humanity’s end.

written by George Lefferts
directed by Lela Swift
music by Robert Cobert

Alien LoverCast: Pernell Roberts (Mike), Susan Brown (Marian), Kate Mulgrew (Susan), Steven Earl Tanner (Jude), John Ventantonio (Marc), David Lewis (Dr. Steiner), Harry Moses (Richard), and Herman

Notes: This was Kate Mulgrew’s first television job, filmed sometime around her 20th birthday, though it was beaten to the punch by her debut in the series regular role of Mary on Ryan’s Hope (a daytime soap which went into production after Alien Lover). Just four years later, she was starring in her own series, Mrs. Alien LoverColumbo. She was later a series regular on the late ’80s hospital series Heartbeat, the short-lived early ’90s James Garner series Man Of The People, 2007’s The Black Donnellys, Cartoon Network’s live-action series NTSF:SD:SUV, and most recently was Red in the Netflix series Orange Is The New Black, though anyone reading this site likely knows her best from her seven-year stint as Captain Kathryn Janeway on Star Trek: Voyager, a role she reprised (with a promotion) in 2002’s Star Trek: Nemesis. Alien Lover was a TV movie-of-the-week aired as part of the NBC Mystery Movie, an anthology series that ran from 1973 through 1978, usually leaning on crime/mystery stories, but occasionally dipping into – as was the case here – the paranormal.

LogBook entry and review by Earl Green Read More

A Matter Of Life And Death

Space: 1999An Eagle is launched to reconnoiter a promising planet which the Moonbase Alpha crew has dubbed “Terra Nova” – new Earth. The two men aboard the ship return with good news – they’ve found a planet with an Earthlike atmosphere and almost unlimited resources – but just as they make their final approach back to the moon, an electrical discharge envelops the Eagle, incapacitating the crew. The ship is still brought in for a safe landing, with the crew alive but unconscious – and carrying an extra passenger who Dr. Russell says is her husband, missing and presumed dead after his last space mission ended in disaster five years ago. Though he is breathing and seems to be alive, none of the medical instruments indicate life signs. Commander Koenig decides to postpone any further visits to Terra Nova, let alone any colonization operations, until the mystery of Russell’s husband. When the long-lost astronaut awakens, Helena tells him of Koenig’s plans to colonize Terra Nova – and then he lashes out at her with the same energy that almost brought the Eagle down.

Order the DVDswritten by Art Wallace & Johnny Byrne
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Richard Johnson (Lee Russell), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Stuart Damon (Parks)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Pin Money

The Invisible ManWalter’s aunt comes to the Klae Corporation headquarters for a rather disjointed visit, just as Walter is headed to Washington for an important meeting. The Westins offer to let her stay with them, only to discover that Aunt Margaret has an affinity to late night poker games…where she loses heavily. To cover her losses, she’s been “borrowing” money from the bank where she works, and this has been discovered by a man who works there and demands a cut of whatever money she takes illegally. Daniel is determined to help Aunt Margaret not only return the money, but clean up at the poker table to clear her name…and he just has to stage a bank robbery to do it. What could possibly go wrong?

written by James D. Parriott
directed by Alan J. Levi
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Helen Kleeb (Aunt Margaret), John Zee (Arnold), James Blendick (Sanders), Wayne Grace (Baldy), Wayne Taylor (Big Nose), Thom Carney (Mersky), Larry French (Tex), Jim Mills (Lawyer), Ray Ballard (Poker Player), G.J. Mitchell (Carter), Arline Anderson (Teller), Karl Lukas (1st Truck Driver), Mickey Gatlin (2nd Truck Driver), Gene Borkan (Cabbie), James Whitworth (Bruiser)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Earthbound

Space: 1999As Commissioner Symonds, stranded on Moonbase Alpha since the moon was thrown free of Earth’s orbit, chides Commander Koenig for not trying to find a way to reverse the moon’s course, an small alien spacecraft is detected hurtling toward the moon. The ship crash-lands, and Koenig leads an expedition to see if there are any survivors. What his team finds is a number of humanoids in suspended animation, though the first attempt to revive one of them proves disastrous – and an automatic security system awakens the others, who naturally want to know why one of their crew is dead. Koenig manages to convince the aliens to move their vehicle to Moonbase Alpha for repairs, but is annoyed when Symonds tries to pull rank upon meeting the alien visitors. As it happens, Captain Zantor and his crew happened to be mounting a peaceful exploration of Earth, and Helena’s examination reveals Zantor’s people to be perfectly compatible with humanity. Forgiving the death of his crew member, Zantor even offers the vacant stasis chamber to one member of Koenig’s crew, and Symonds jumps at the chance to go back to Earth, even though it’s a 75-year trip. Helena insists on testing the aliens’ equipment to ensure suitability for a human passenger, but she is put into a deeper state of suspended animation by accident – and with the open seat to Earth now filled by accident, Symonds wants to take Zantor’s entire ship by force.

Order the DVDswritten by Anthony Terpiloff
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Roy Dotrice (Commissioner Symonds), Christopher Lee (Captain Zantor), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter)

Notes: Some of the background atmosphere sounds heard as Koenig’s crew enters the alien spacecraft are well-known to viewers of other British SF staples – namely as part of the background sound loop of many a Dalek control center in Doctor Who.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Klae Dynasty

The Invisible ManNormal day-to-day operations at the Klae Corporation are turned upside-down when the three Klae siblings, the corporation’s founders and benefactors, want to host a summit meeting of great minds at the institute. At the top of their agenda is security, and they immediately want the “Klae resource” deployed without knowing what it is, only knowing that the Westins are somehow in charge of it. There is good reason to worry about security, too: as preparations are being made, Caroline Klae is kidnapped. In the chaos, Dan slips away to go invisible, trying to follow the kidnappers, only to discover that their getaway doesn’t add up: it’s a staged decoy, and Caroline must still be somewhere on the Klae Corporation grounds. In the meantime, a power play ensues between her two very different brothers regarding what becomes of her share of the family fortune.

written by Philip DeGuere, Jr.
directed by Alan J. Levi
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Nancy Kovack Mehta (Caroline Klae), Farley Granger (Julian Klae), George Murdock (Captain Scopes), Peter Donat (Morgan Klae), Joe Maross (Ryan), Rayford Barnes (Pierce)

The Invisible ManNotes: George Murdock would go on to play the recurring role of the doctor aboard the 1970s incarnation of Battlestar Galactica, and would gain further sci-fi infamy as the face of “God” in 1989’s Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, redeeming himself among Trek fans a year later as Admiral Hansen in the fan-favorite Star Trek: The Next Generation two-parter The Best Of Both Worlds. Peter Donat would resurface as the villain in another cult sci-fi classic, as recurring enemy Dr. Mordecai Sahmbi in the 1990s syndicated series Time Trax.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Into Infinity (Gerry Anderson’s The Day After Tomorrow)

Into InfinityAt Space Station Delta, the starship Altares is preparing for an unprecedented mission: the first manned interstellar mission, utilizing a photonic drive that will create a time dilation effect relative to Earth; any messages the Altares crew sends back from Alpha Centauri will reach the descendants of the mission controllers who helped launch the ship. The Altares is crewed by two families, and even the children are fully trained in the technical and scientific aspects of the mission.

Activation of the photonic drive goes off without a hitch, but contact with Earth is now measured in years instead of minutes or hours. Altares’ visit to Alpha Centauri takes place on schedule, but an unexpected fault activates the photon drive again, throwing the ship off-course at nearly the speed of light and completely out of touch with Earth. With a star threatening to go supernova at any moment, and a black hole that might crush the Altares, the mission and the crew are in jeopardy.

Into Infinitywritten by Johnny Byrne
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Derek Wadsworth and Steve Coe

Cast:

Brian Blessed (Tom Bowen), Joanna Dunham (Anna Bowen), Nick Tate (Captain Harry Masters), Don Fellows (Jim Forbes), Katharine Levy (Jane Masters), Martin Lev (David Bowen), Ed Bishop (Narrator)

Notes: A pilot that never made it to series, Into Infinity first aired in the United States as part of NBC’s occasional “Special Treat” program, and then aired in the UK a year later under the title Gerry Anderson’s Day After Tomorrow). Devised by Gerry Anderson (of Supermarionation, UFO, and Space: 1999 fame) and Space: 1999 script editor Johnny Byrne (also responsible for a few episodes of Doctor Who, including Into InfinityThe Keeper Of Traken and the character of Nyssa), Into Infinity was made between the first and second seasons of Space: 1999. As the Altares plunges into the event horizon of the black hole toward the end of the show, a psychedelic sequence ensues which eerily anticipates – in great detail – the bizzaro ending of the 1979 Disney movie The Black Hole. The producers of the later movie were aiming for something cerebral, quasi-spiritual and ambiguous a la 2001: a space odyssey, but the similarities in the hallucinatory sequences near the end of Into Infinity and The Black Hole are striking.

LogBook entry and review by Earl Green Read More

The Full Circle

Space: 1999Eagle 6 is launched to explore an Earthlike planet, but when the landing party doesn’t report back to Moonbase Alpha for hours, Koenig orders the ship returned by remote control…but Eagle 6 returns with no one aboard except for a dead caveman. A full-scale rescue operation is launched, with only three days to find the missing Eagle crew before the moon moves out of range. The rescue mission goes disastrously wrong, though – Commander Koenig and Dr. Russell go missing, along with the rest of their Eagle’s search party, while Carter is attacked by more cavemen when he lands a second Eagle and begins his own search for Koenig. Carter narrowly escapes being killed when the cavemen are too fascinated by his communicatior to deliver the fatal blow. Back at the Moonbase, the autopsy of the caveman turns up something very disturbing: he was originally a member of the first Eagle crew.

Order the DVDswritten by Jesse Lasky Jr. & Pat Silver
directed by Bob Kellett
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Oliver Cotton (Spear man)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Another Time, Another Place

Space: 1999A cloud of dust and brilliant lights draws the moon into its center and then keeps moving past it. Moonbase Alpha sustains moderate damage, but it also seems to have been thrown far from where its normal wanderings would have taken it. One member of the grew, Regina Kesslann, hasn’t quite recovered from the collision with the dust cloud, insisting that she saw the moon vanishing into the distance – from inside the Moonbase. She also seems to think that Commander Koenig and Alan Carter died during the incident. As the moon approaches a solar system, instruments seem to indicate that the star is Earth’s sun – and that the third planet orbiting that star is Earth itself. Koenig grows skeptical as the moon slips into its old orbit without incident, though the rest of the crew is eager to return home without asking too many questions. The one person who continues to have difficulty is Regina, and Dr. Russell is at a loss to explain her condition. When Professor Bergman does a closer inspection, he discovers something even more disturbing: the Earth is now a radioactive wasteland, incapable of supporting human life.

Order the DVDswritten by Johnny Byrne
directed by David Tomblin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Judy Geeson (Regina Kesslann), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter)

Notes: Judy Geeson later appeared in early seasons of Star Trek: Voyager as Sandrine, the proprietor of Tom Paris’ holodeck pool hall.

LogBook entry by Earl Green