Tar Pit

Land Of The LostTar pits are nothing new where/when the Marshalls come from – dinosaur fossils aplenty have been found there in the 20th century, after all – but they have an urgent dilemma when Dopey finds himself sinking into a tar pit from which he doesn’t seem to be able to escape despite their best efforts. Unless the Marshalls and the Paku can rescue Dopey, the most inoffensive of the local dinosaurs may become a fossil himself.

Order the DVDDownload this episodewritten by Margaret Armen
directed by Gordon Wiles
music by Michael Lloyd

Land Of The LostCast: Spencer Milligan (Rick Marshall), Wesley Eure (Will Marshall), Kathy Coleman (Penny Marshall), Phillip Paley (Cha-Ka), Scutter McKay (Ta), Sharon Baird (Sa)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Lights of Mystery Mountain

IsisCindy surprises Andrea and Rick with clear photos of UFOs spotted near Mystery Mountain, as well as photos showing burn marks on the ground near the sightings. When a report comes in that someone renting a cabin on Mystery Mountain has disappeared, Andrea and Rick decide to investigate. They witness the spectacle of the UFOs themselves when they arrive, and Cindy’s photos attract the attention of a couple of teenagers who seem to have a great deal of interest in the UFO sightings. But are they interested in seeing the UFOs…or in covering something up?

Get this season on DVDDownload this episode via Amazon's Unboxwritten by Russell Bates
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

Cast: Joanna Cameron (Andrea Thomas), Brian Cutler (Rick Mason), IsisJoanna Pang (Cindy Lee), Kelly Thordsen (Joel Moss), Hank Brandt (Sheriff Harley), Ken Wolger (Art Byron), Mike Maitland (Chick), Albert Reed (Dr. Barnes)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

It’s All In Your Mind

Far-Out Space NutsAfter confusing “lunch” with “launch”, two launch pad employees are blasted into deep space. They frantically try to return to Earth, but are faced with the reality that they’re really just qualified to load food on a spaceship, not fly it.

Having already explored one planet where they found a lonely life form known as Honk, which communicates entirely by honking through a horn-like protrusion on its head, they land on a planet ruled by a mind-controlling computer named G.A.L., only to find that Junior’s thoughts somehow become reality here. That’s the only way they can escape G.A.L. and its sinister cybernetic henchmen.

written by Dick Robbins & Duane Poole
directed by Wes Kenney
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Leo Gordon (Head Dronek), Joan Gerber (voice of G.A.L.)

Notes: The series art director was Herman Zimmerman, who would go on to create the distinctive sets Star Trek: The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Star Trek V, Star Trek VI, Star Trek Generations, and so on. Representing Star Trek’s past was the show’s makeup chief, Fred Phillips, who had created and applied Mr. Spock’s Vulcan ears for the entire run of Star Trek in Far-Out Space Nutsthe 1960s. The name of the all-controlling computer, “G.A.L. 36-24-36”, is both a play on 2001: a space odyssey‘s HAL 9000, and a set of measurements that was likely intended to sail directly over the heads of the show’s young audience. (An almost identical gag was used a few years later as an episode title on Quark.)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Flames Of Doom

Planet Of The ApesThe spaceship Ventura, with its crew of three astronauts, plunges through a time warp as it returns to Earth from a deep space mission to find the whereabouts of a lost expedition (which was itself launched to search for Taylor’s crew). Though it still lands on Earth, its crew has arrived nearly two millennia after they expected to return. The world is now ruled by intelligent apes, and a heated debate rages over whether human beings are dangerous to the dominant ape species, or if they can be preserved as harmless pets. Astronauts Hudson, Franklin and Carter find a settlement of humans, but these humans are primitive at best. The contrast between the native humans and the astronauts attracts the attention of the new rulers of Earth, who consider a more modern human race a threat to their existence, and they set out to capture the three astronauts.

Order the DVDswritten by Larry Spiegel
directed by Cullen Houghtaling
music by Dean Elliott

Voice Cast: Tom Williams (Bill Hudson), Claudette Nevins (Judy Franklin), Austin Stoker (Jeff Carter), Henry Corden (Dr. Cornelius), Tress MacNeille (Dr. Zira), Henry Corden (General Urko)

Notes: It’s nearly impossible to reconcile Return To The Planet Of The Apes with either the movies that started the saga, or the short-lived live-action series that attempted to continue it. It’s probably wisest to view Return as a retelling of the Apes saga for a younger audience, rather than any kind of continuation. The depiction of humans at a stone-age level, the inclusion of Cornelius, Zira and Dr. Zaius, and the mentions of Brent and Nova from Beneath The Planet Of The Apes, are appropriated from the films, but the apes in Return have far more advanced technology, including motorized vehicles and television. The character of General Urko is borrowed from the live-action television series, again serving as a persistent nemesis for the humans. The exterior of the three-person Ventura is represented by artwork of the single-seater Mercury capsules of the 1960s, rather than a depiction that’s anywhere near the vehicles seen in the Apes movies or live-action TV series; the design of the American space shuttle was finalized by the time Return To The Planet Of The Apes went into production, but wasn’t used.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

894X2RY713 I Love You

Sense8A flying saucer from the planet ZR-3, piloted by the androids Fum and Fi, lands in an American city in the 1970s (despite the fact that the spaceship itself hails from the year 2369). Inquisitive Jerry and his teenage babysitter, Alice, wander aboard the saucer and find themselves whisked away as Fum and Fi make a hasty escape from Earth authorities.

But their first stop away from Earth isn’t much more hospitable, as Alice and Jerry find themselves arrested on an alien planet where everyone except them covers their faces and is required by law to wear a number. To appear in public unmasked and unnumbered is a combination of two of this world’s worst crimes, and it’s up to Fum and Fi (and their half-horse, half-dog pet, the Dorse) to help the kids escape.

The Lost Saucerwritten by Si Rose
directed by Jack Regas
music by Michael Lloyd

Cast: Jim Nabors (Fum), Ruth Buzzi (Fi), Alice Playten (Alice), Jarrod Johnson (Jerry), Edson Stroll (456Y3Z1843), Duncan McLeod (136B76Q128), Jerry Holland (321Y3Z1848), Annmarie (361X2RYT13), Larry Larsen (The Dorse)

Notes: Production illustrator Mike Minor (1940-1987) had done design work on three episodes of the original Star Trek’s final season, and would later go on to work on the aborted attempt to launch a new Star Trek series as the cornerstone of a new Paramount network in 1978 (frequently referred to as Star Trek Phase II), and was The Lost Saucerresponsible for many of the early illustrations of that planned series’ new bridge set and other locales, as well as contributing designs to Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan. He also worked on The Powers Of Matthew Star, The Winds Of War, The Man Who Saw Tomorrow, Spacehunter: Adventures In The Forbidden Zone, The Beastmaster, Meteor, Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins, and, in contrast to his work on The Lost Saucerthis Saturday morning series, also worked on the decidedly less family-friendly 1974 adult film sci-fi spoof Flesh Gordon. Jim Nabors (1930-2017) was best known for starring as Gomer Pyle USMC, a military comedy built around a character Pyle originated on The Andy Griffith Show in the early 1960s. (His trademark Gomer Pyle catchphrase, “Well, gaw-lee!”, is heard here as well.) On the subject of how many actors with SAG cards could possibly be named Duncan McLeod, there can presumably be only one.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Klae Resource

The Invisible ManSome time after the incident that caused him to be rendered permanently invisible, Dr. Daniel Westin and his wife, Dr. Kate Westin, are in the employ of the Klae Corporation, and are hired out as a team of “specialists” to take on particularly difficult tasks. One such task will require both invisibility and cunning: an inventor named Parks has gone missing, and the government is concerned that he might sell his latest energy breakthrough to the highest bidder in the Middle East. His last known location is a Vegas casino hotel, but no one has actually seen him recently…and solving the mystery of his whereabouts will require the skills of someone else who no one can actually see.

written by Steven Bochco
directed by Robert Michael Lewis
music by Henry Mancini

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Robert Alda (Fielder), Conrad Janis (Homer), Barry Sullivan (Lionel Parks), Scott Walker (1st Guard), Paul Kent (Kelly), Dick Balduzzi (Agent Stern), James Karen (Hotel Manager), Joseph George (2nd Guard), Jackie Russell (Female Operator), David Knapp (Casino Drunk), Dennis Robertson (Technical Expert), Jack Frey (Bellman), Gary Pagett (Croupier), Chuck Courtney (Limo Driver), Richard Geary (Boone)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Force Of Life

Space: 1999Technician Anton Zoref starts his day on Moonbase Alpha like any other, but unknown to him, the rest of the base has been frozen in time – an event corresponding with the arrival of a glowing blue cloud of energy. It simply passes through the moonbase’s walls and takes Zoref over. When the rest of the crew begins moving again, they have no memory of the blue energy that they observed approaching the moon. When Zoref awakens, even he seems normal – until he shorts out a medical monitor as Dr. Russell gives him a routine checkup. That’s just the beginning of the strange signs Zoref exhibits. He now seems to be able to drain energy from any source on the moonbase, and his hunger for that energy is beyond his control. When Zoref’s abilities grow to include draining energy from other living beings, Koenig declares him a deadly threat and reluctantly orders his termination. But when Koenig powers down Moonbase Alpha’s reactors to starve the creature that is now stalking the corridors, will he really risk the lives of everyone on the base to carry out one death sentence?

Order the DVDswritten by Johnny Byrne
directed by David Tomblin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Ian McShane (Anton Zoref), Gay Hamilton (Eva), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), John Hamill (Mark Dominix), Eva Reuber-Staier (Jane)

Note: This is the first episode (in the original broadcast order) to mention Professor Bergman’s artificial heart.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Zarn

Land Of The LostTaking shelter in a cave when they’re cornered by a dinosaur, Rick and Will find a vast cavern containing something that may or may not be a spaceship. They find another human being in a coffin-like container, and it turns out to be a woman from Rick’s home town, and they share many experiences and memories from years before he was marooned here. Rick invites her to join the Marshalls for dinner, though Will and Holly are suspicious of their guest, and how quickly she gains Rick’s trust. Is she too good to be true?

Order the DVDDownload this episodewritten by Dick Morgan
directed by Bob Lally
music by Michael Lloyd

Cast: Spencer Milligan (Rick Marshall), Wesley Eure (Will Marshall), Kathy Coleman (Penny Marshall), Brooke Bundy (Sharon), Marvin Miller (Zarn voice), Van Snowden (Zarn)

Land Of The LostNotes: Brooke Bundy has played guest roles on Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea, Mission: Impossible, Circle Of Fear, Night Gallery, Search, Wonder Woman, and Starman, as well as being the first chief engineer of the new Enterprise in the second episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation (whose first season seemed to have a new chief engineer nearly every week). Marvin Miller would go on to be the omnipresent voice of the narrator throughout another Sid & Marty Krofft series, Electra Woman & Dyna Girl a year later.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Fool’s Dare

IsisA string of car thefts with no clues has the police puzzled. When her own car is stolen, Andrea is perplexed as well, though an oily rag left where her car was parked provides a clue. Cindy is challenged by two of her fellow students to climb into an abandoned junk lot, but sprains her ankle as she climbs down from the fence…and she’s sure she sees Andrea’s car getting a new paint job. Now she must alert Isis to the presence of the chop shop without blowing her cover.

Get this season on DVDDownload this episode via Amazon's Unboxwritten by David Dworski
directed by Hollingsworth Morse
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

Cast: Joanna Cameron (Andrea Thomas), Brian Cutler (Rick Mason), IsisJoanna Pang (Cindy Lee), Charles Cyphers (Sam Miles), Frank Whiteman (Cy Kahn), Joshua Albee (Ernie Rothchild), Jeffrey Tyler (Frank Iverson), Albert Reed (Dr. Barnes)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Crystallites

Far-Out Space NutsAt their latest destination, Junior and Barney discover that they’re out of water. Junior and Honk go exploring to try to find a water source, but instead, Junior finds gourd-like fruit whose innards taste like chocolate. But he’s allergic to the fruit, and every time he sneezes, he turns into a giant green hairy beast without realizing it. But the locals aren’t worried about that…until they decide Junior is their next ruler.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), John Carradine (Ruler)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Escape From Ape City

Planet Of The ApesBill has been captured by the apes and taken back to their city, where the ape scientists, Cornelius and Zira, express an interest in him. That interest keeps Bill from being subjected to brutal slave labor or taking part in ape war games, but when he learns that Zira and Cornelius plan to perform surgery on his brain, Bill voices his objections…which stuns his captors, who have never met a human intelligent enough to speak. Bill plots not only his own escape, but plans to free the rest of the humans captured by the apes.

Order the DVDswritten by Larry Spiegel
directed by Cullen Houghtaling
music by Dean Elliott

Voice Cast: Tom Williams (Bill Hudson), Claudette Nevins (Judy Franklin), Austin Stoker (Jeff Carter), Henry Corden (Dr. Cornelius), Tress MacNeille (Dr. Zira), Henry Corden (General Urko)

Return to The Planet Of The ApesNotes: The first few minutes of this episode basically repeat some of the major plot points of the original Planet Of The Apes movie; Bill is called “Blue Eyes” (as opposed to Taylor being called “Bright Eyes” in the film), and the revelation that he can speak plays out similarly to that of Taylor in the movie, again making it easier to regard this as a reboot from the ground up, rather than a part of the original film and TV continuity.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Fine Art Of Diplomacy

The Invisible ManWhen priceless pieces of art go missing, replaced by forgeries, the Klae Resource is called into action. Daniel is happy to help try to solve the mystery, but he’s less thrilled with the plan that calls for his wife to distract the suspected art thief, a foreign ambassador, by any means necessary. Unfortunately for both of them, the ambassador has quite lethal ideas on protecting his stash of priceless paintings, and evil Daniel’s invisibility may not see things through.

written by James D. Parriott
directed by Sigmund Neufeld Jr.
music by Henry Mancini

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Ross Martin (Ambassador Diego Devega), Michael Pataki (Tandi), Paul Stewart (Mr. Wood), Vincent Beck (Gregario), Pepe Callahan (Manuel), Gwil Richards (Capitol Guard), Nicholas Lewis (1st Embassy Guard), Raymond O’Keefe (2nd Embassy Guard)

Invisible ManNotes: This is one of the earliest professional writing credits for James D. Parriott, who returned to pen several more Invisible Man scripts. He also wrote episodes of The Bionic Woman, The Incredible Hulk, and The Six Million Dollar Man before embarking on a stellar career of creating and running his own shows, from Voyagers! to Misfits Of Science to Forever Knight to Defying Gravity.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Collision Course

Space: 1999An asteroid is plummeting toward the moon, and a last-ditch effort is underway to plant nuclear explosives on the rock to destroy it before it collides with Moonbase Alpha. During the flight to deposit one of the last bombs, Alan Carter’s Eagle runs into technical problems, delaying the all-important timed blast. Commander Koenig is forced to detonate the asteroid before Carter is clear of the blast radius. Despite Bergman’s warnings about debris and residual radiation, Koenig insists on leading a recovery mission to find Carter – dead or alive. Aboard the rescue ship, Koenig begins hearing a female voice he doesn’t recognize, but the voice gives him the precise coordinates of Carter’s ship. Alan, still alive, hears the voice as well – and thinks he sees a veiled figure in the cockpit of his Eagle. But a new danger presents itself when a massive planet appears in the path of the moon – and this time, there’s no getting around it or going through it. Bergman and Paul Morrow concoct a plan to recreate the cataclysmic blast that originally threw the moon out of Earth’s orbit to divert its course, but Koenig continues to hear the mysterious voice, and this time it’s telling him not to change the moon’s course. The voice was right once before, so how far will Koenig trust it this time?

Order the DVDswritten by Anthony Terpiloff
directed by Ray Austin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Margaret Leighton (Queen Arra), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Robots Of Pod

Far-Out Space NutsThe lander is trapped on a planet where a full-scale robot uprising is taking place. Barney and Junior have to disguise themselves as robots to survive in the tyrannical rule of Mercurial, the robots’ overlord, and they have to stay alive long enough to help the other robots overthrow him.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Claudio Guzman
music by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Far-Out Space NutsCast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Eve Bruce (Princess Lantana), Earle Doud (Mercurial)

Notes: Both of the creators of Far Out Space Nuts appear in the flesh in this episode: Chuck McCann appears in every episode as Barney, while Earle Doud put in an appearance as the robots’ ruler.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Man Of Influence

The Invisible ManThe Klae Corporation is asked to investigate reports that a shady “medium” is holding seances to allow a senator to speak to his dead wife, but is using that illusion to influence the senator’s votes. The Westins go to visit the medium, but when it appears their cover might be blown, Daniel announces that Kate is a powerful psychic with telekinetic powers. He then ducks out of sight and uses his invisibility to lend that claim some credence, winning Kate an invitation to the senator’s next seance…but until then, someone is trying to kill the Westins before they can make another appearance. It’ll be no small matter for Daniel and Kate to expose the fraudulent medium at large.

teleplay by Seeleg Lester and Rick Blaine
story by Rick Blaine
directed by Alan J. Levi
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), John Vernon (Mr. Sheed), Gene Raymond (Senator Hanover), Jack Colvin (Mr. Williams), Shirley O’Hara (Margaret Hanover), Loni Anderson (Andrea Hanover), Dorothy Love (Woman), Donald Gentry (Policeman), James Standifer (Policeman), Alan Mandell (Senator Baldwin), Robert Douglas (Dr. Theophilus)

Notes: This is one of the earliest professional acting credits for Loni Anderson, just a few years before she won a starring role in WKRP In Cincinnati.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

War Games

Space: 1999As the moon swings close to a habitable planet, it is greeted by that world’s warships – not the friendly greeting Koenig hoped for. Eagles are launched to intercept them, loaded for bear…and the attacking ships are destroyed far too easily for Alan Carter’s tastes. Another attack wave is launched, and this time Moonbase Alpha takes heavy damage and suffers heavy casualties. Three additional Eagles are destroyed before they can even lift off, and now Alan Carter’s fleet of three armed ships are the moon’s only defense. One of them is taken out by the still-unknown assailants, and Koenig’s crew scrambles to keep up with the damage on Moonbase Alpha. Carter succeeds in eliminating the new attack wave, but his own ship is disabled in the process…and another wave arrives, this time targeting Alpha’s main mission control center and medical bay directly. Koenig orders the entire crew to move as deep underground as possible, and Carter musters just enough power from his Eagle to fend off the attackers. With a momentary reprieve in the action, Koenig and his team assess the damage – and there’s no way Moonbase Alpha will survive without outside assistance. And the only nearby civilization lies on the planet from which the hostile ships have been launched…an unlikely candidate for humanitarian aid.

Order the DVDswritten by Christopher Penfold
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Anthony Valentine (Male alien), Isla Blair (Female alien), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Sound Of Silence

IsisA classroom demonstration of a portable force field powered by a uranium pellet impresses Andrea’s friends, and intrigues the troubled student Bill, whose failure to win a recent science fair has left him without the means to buy a car. Desperate to overcome this obstacle, Bill steals the force field and offers to sell it to a local criminal, but rather than buying it from Bill, that criminal wants to pay Bill to be the one to use it. Worse yet, Andrea finds that the uranium pellet powering the device is leaking. Whoever has the force field device is in danger of radioactive contamination…but can she walk through the field by changing into Isis?

Get this season on DVDDownload this episode via Amazon's Unboxwritten by Sid Morse
directed by Arnold Laven
music by Yvette Blais & Jeff Michael

Cast: Joanna Cameron (Andrea Thomas), Brian Cutler (Rick Mason), IsisJoanna Pang (Cindy Lee), Leigh McClocskey (Bill Cady), James Canning (B.J. Tanker), Philip Bruns (Jack Evans), Wayne Storm (Jocko), Albert Reed (Dr. Barnes)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Fantastic Journey

Far-Out Space NutsBarney and Junior are surrounded by mad scientists when one scientist, clearly a few test tubes short of a laboratory, asks for their help in finding another, who turns out to be just as insane. Can either one be trusted?

written by Buddy Atkinson & Dick Conway
directed by Claudio Guzman
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Kay E. Kuter (Dr. Kala), Stanley Ralph Ross (Dr. Drone), Whitney Rydbeck (Prof. Rundspock)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Planet of Evil

Doctor WhoOn the planet Zeta Minor, an expedition from a neighboring planet is doomed. Their ship is unable to lift off from the surface, and something is stalking and killing the crew one by one. The TARDIS arrives and the Doctor and Sarah offer their help, but they’re also suspected of causing the difficulties. The Doctor discovers that an attempt to bring a sample of antimatter back has attracted the unwelcome, but instinctively protective, attention of Zeta Minor’s native antimatter life forms. Worse yet, Professor Sorenson, hell-bent on keeping the sample aboard, continues his experiments with antimatter, slowly transforming himself into a hybrid matter-antimatter creature with no control over his actions.

Order the DVDDownload this episodewritten by Louis Marks
directed by David Maloney
music by Dudley Simpson

Guest Cast: Terence Brook (Braun), Tony McEwan (Baldwin), Frederick Jaeger (Sorenson), Ewen Solon (Vishinsky), Prentis Hancock (Salamar), Michael Wisher (Morelli / voice of Ranjit), Graham Weston (De Haan), Louis Mahoney (Ponti), Haydn Wood (O’Hara), Melvyn Bedford (Reig), Mike Lee Lane (Monster)

Broadcast from September 27 through October 18, 1975

LogBook entry & review by Earl Green Read More

Eyes Only

The Invisible ManA woman with access to some of the most sensitive information in Washington is believed to be selling those secrets somehow, and bodies are piling up in her wake. The Klae Resource is called into action, with Kate posing as a would-be employee interviewing for a job, while quietly allowing the invisible Daniel to investigate the leak of vital secrets. He discovers that the “spy” is herself a victim of circumstances being exploited by someone with a much darker agenda…but Carlson insists that, rather than whisking her away to safety, she has to remain visible, and vulnerable, as a decoy to draw the real villains out.

written by Leslie Stevens
directed by Alan J. Levi
music by Henry Mancini

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Barbara Anderson (Paula Simon), William Prince (Dr. Kenneth Maynard), Bobby Van (Tony Bernard), John Kerr (Kirk), Thayer David (Jack Pierson), Frank Christi (Nick Palanzi), Vince Martorano (Joe Palanzi), Tony Swartz (Guard with dog), William Bronder (Marty), Gregory Bach (Dino), Bob Hackman (Project Worker), Vern Rowe (Cab Driver)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Tower Of Tagot

Far-Out Space NutsUsing his “future machine”, the mad tyrant Tagot sees a future in which Barney, Junior and Honk threaten his reign. The Sarians, who seek to end Tagot’s reign by rescuing their kidnapped queen, equip the wayward space travelers with such weapons as an inviso-ray and a bravery belt, because they’re equally sure that Barney and Junior pose a threat to Tagot. The only missing piece of the puzzle? Nobody knows how they’ll overthrow Tagot.

written by Earle Doud & Chuck McCann
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Robert Quarry (Zarlam), Barbara Rhoades (Pulma), Paul Wexler (Tagot)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Death’s Other Dominion

Space: 1999Passing close to the icy world of Ultima Thule, the moon receives a signal from a lost Earth expedition claiming to have created a paradise – one in which human beings can live forever. When Koenig, Dr. Russell, Alan Carter and Professor Bergman take an Eagle down to the surface, however, they find the most forbidding icy landscape imaginable – one in which they almost don’t survive. The humans on Ultima Thule find them just in time, except for Carter, who stumbles back to the Eagle and manages to get back inside. Dr. Cabot Rowland and the seemingly insane Colonel Tanner lead two discrete factions of survivors from a failed mission to Uranus, but they’re not exactly locked in a struggle for survival. Beneath the surface of Ultima Thule, coniditions are tolerable – and all indications are that the “Thulians” are indeed impervious to disease or old age. What’s more, Rowland is eager for the Alphans to join them, promising the entire crew immortality of their own. Tanner, himself a former command office despite his disheveled appearance and behavior, takes Koenig into his confidence and reveals that the immortality promised by Rowland has come at a tragic price in wasted lives, and the process is by no means guaranteed to succeed. But even with this information, will Koenig’s crew opt for eternal life on Ultima Thule, or their uncertain existence on Moonbase Alpha?

Order the DVDswritten by Anthony Terpiloff & Elizabeth Barrows
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Brian Blessed (Dr. Cabot Rowland), John Shrapnel (Colonel Jack Tanner), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Mary Miller (Freda)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Barnard Wants Out

The Invisible ManDaniel and Kate are assigned to visit a scientific conference in Geneva, where Daniel’s old mentor, Dr. Barnard, is expected to announce his latest breakthrough. Barnard defected to a Communist country several years ago, but the CIA has asked the Klae Resource to contact him to see if he wants to return to the western world. Going invisible and contacting Barnard is easy for Daniel, but getting himself, Kate, Barnard and his daughter back to America alive is the hard part…especially when it seems that Anna Barnard’s loyalties lie with the country in which she has grown up.

written by James D. Parriott
directed by Alan J. Levi
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Nehemiah Persoff (Dr. Leon Barnard), Jane Actman (Anna), Paul Shenar (Alexi Zartov), Cliff Osmond (Elevator Guard), George Fisher (Yuri), Joe Rainer (Guard), Peter Colt (Petra), Ralph Anderson (Bell Boy), Charles Stewart (Man), Inga Neilsen (Swedish Bombshell), Macon McCalman (Consul)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

The Three Spaceketeers

Far-Out Space NutsAfter some simple housekeeping tasks go awry, Barney declares Junior “useless”…and Junior decides to strike out on his own, leaving Barney and Honk behind. Trouble immediately finds him in the form of two alien freedom fighters seeking to free their queen, who is imprisoned in a nearby fortress. These aliens believe that a great leader named “Junio” will guide them in their hour of greatest need…but, since they don’t know any better, “Junior” is drafted into their plan.

written by Dick Robbins & Duane Poole
directed by Wes Kenney
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Bob Basso (Junio), Al Checco (Sporian #1), Robert Dunlap (Sporian #2), Howard George (Lizard #1), Jason Kincaid (Lizard #2), Kathryn Loder (Royal Helona)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Voyager’s Return

Space: 1999Two Eagles are sent to intercept an unknown artificial object on a direct course for the moon. The object emits an unusual energy which cripples both Eagles. Alan Carter is able to pull his ship away and return to Moonbase Alpha, while the second Eagle is destroyed. Then a remarkable signal is received: the object is none other than the Earth-launched Voyager 1 unmanned probe. Powered by the Queller atomic drive, Voyager 1 overpowers everything that comes in close contact with it – leaving Koenig with mere hours before the probe destroys Moonbase Alpha. Bergman is unable to find any way to shut down the Queller drive from a distance. But Koenig is stunned when an Alpha scientist, Dr. Linden, comes forward and quietly admits that he is actually Queller, the inventor of the overpowered drive. Queller thinks he can find the means to shut down Voyager 1’s engine without destroying the probe or its wealth of information gathered in deep space. But some members of Alpha’s crew, including Paul Morrow, would have a grudge to settle with Queller is Koenig released the man’s identity: Queller’s Voyager 2 probe exploded after liftoff, killing many innocent civilians, including Morrow’s father and the parents of “Linden”‘s own lab assistant. Even if Queller can figure out how to disable his nuclear engine, will he live to put his idea into practice when his assistant learns his identity?

Order the DVDswritten by Johnny Byrne
directed by Bob Kellett
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Jeremy Kemp (Dr. Linden), Barry Stokes (Jim Haynes), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Alex Scott (Aarchon), Lawrence Trimble (Pilot Abrams)

Voyager 1Notes: This episode features a Voyager 1 unmanned probe, but it’s not the real thing. This episode’s Voyager 1 probe is a bulky craft (resembling, more than anything, the Viking Mars-landing probes of the 1970s) launched in 1985, powered by atomic engines. The real Voyager 1 (seen at right) was launched in 1977 alongside its sister ship, Voyager 2. It had small maneuvering engines, but it did, in fact, draw its operating power from three radioisotope thermonuclear generators which passively generated power from the decay of radioactive material (since the Voyager probes’ distance from the sun makes solar power generation impractical). So, while the shape and specifics of Space: 1999’s Voyager probes are off, this episode anticipated the NASA/JPL Voyager probes with a fair degree of accuracy. (It’s also worth noting, however, that the Voyager probes had been in planning since the late 1960s.) This episode is also notable for featuring Jeremy Kemp, who played Captain Picard’s brother Robert in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Flight Of The Pippets

Far-Out Space NutsA tiny flying saucer buzzes Junior while he naps, and he soon meets the crew, who can make themselves as big as he is – or shrink themselves (and him) – with a device they carry. When Honk arrives to rescue the miniaturized Junior, the aliens flee…and Junior is still tiny. He may have to become even tinier to thwart the Pippets’ plan to be the big species on the block.

written by Earle Doud & Check McCann
directed by Al Schwartz
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), Robert Dunlap (Pippet Captain), Michael Hawes (Pippet), Mickey Morton (Pippet)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Alpha Child

Space: 1999The first child since the moon left Earth’s orbit is born, and Dr. Russell happily reports that the delivery took place with no complications. But within an hour of the birth, something remarkable and inexplicable happens: the child seems to age several years in the blink of an eye. All of his motor skills suddenly seem to be on a par with those of a five-year-old, until Dr. Russell discovers he’s deaf and mute – sparking fears that the radiation and other effects experienced by the moon since it left the solar system may mean that normal childbirth isn’t possible on Moonbase Alpha. Despite this, Koenig and the entire crew take great delight in helping to raise little Jackie (named after his late father, a deceased crew member), and Bergman discovers that the boy has an aptitude for artwork …and perhaps more than just artwork, as he sketches a detailed drawing of an enormous spacecraft just as that very ship approaches Moonbase Alpha.

Order the DVDswritten by Christopher Penfold
directed by Ray Austin
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Julian Glover (Jarak), Cyd Hayman (Sue Crawford), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Wayne Brooks (Jackie)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Sight Unseen

The Invisible ManA wealthy man’s blind daughter is kidnapped and held for ransom, all because he was on the verge of divulging all of his ties to organized crime. Believing this assignment to be particularly dangerous, Dan and Kate are instructed to simply find out where the girl is being held, but are ordered not to rescue her themselves. When the girl’s kidnappers grow suspicious, however, Dan and Kate are left with no choice but to get directly involved, and for once, Dan finds himself helping someone to whom his invisibility doesn’t matter.

teleplay by Brian Rehak
story by Brian & Kandy Rehak
directed by Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
music by Pete Rugolo

The Invisible ManCast: David McCallum (Dr. Daniel Westin), Melinda Fee (Dr. Kate Westin), Craig Stevens (Walter Carlson), Jamie Smith Jackson (Laurie Capas), David Opatoshu (Mr. Capas), Richard X. Slattery (Griggs), Harry Davis (Jimmy James), Rod Colbin (Agent Wells), Al Ruscio (Mannie Hallman), Brett Hadley (1st Agent), Jack Garner (Pedestrian), Ken Del Conte (Gate Guard), Tom Geas (3rd Guard), Richard Reed (1st Guard)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Birds Of A Feather

Far-Out Space NutsA group of Motrons – chicken-like birdmen – abduct Barney and Junior. Their leader, Falco, intends to force Junior to sit on the sovereign egg of the Motrons’ aerie. The egg contains the Motrons’ next ruled, but unknown to the hapless humans, they’ve become pawns in a Motron power struggle. Falco’s underlings intend to take the egg out of circulation, removing Falco’s family from power, but to save their own skins, Barney and Junior hatch a plan of their own.

written by Earle Doud & Check McCann
directed by Al Schwartz
Far-Out Space Nutsmusic by Michael Lloyd / arranged by Reg Powell

Cast: Bob Denver (Junior), Chuck McCann (Barney), Patty Maloney (Honk), John Myhers (Falco), Paul Wexler (Motron #1), Robert Dunlap (Motron #2)

LogBook entry by Earl Green

Dragon’s Domain

Space: 1999Tony Cellini, a member of the Moonbase Alpha crew, suffers from recurring visions that he is under attack. But on this occasion, he finds an axe imbedded in one of the walls of his quarters, convincing him that the attack was real. Cellini is soon detected breaking into one of the Eagle launch pads, and when Carter tries to stop him from stealing an Eagle, Cellini attacks him. Koenig has to stun Cellini to stop the hijack attempt, and Dr. Russell criticizes Cellini’s very presence on Moonbase Alpha. Prior to taking command of the moonbase, Koenig and Cellini were fellow astronauts competing for command of the Ultra Probe, which was the furthest-ranging manned mission of its day. Cellini won the captain’s seat on that mission, but returned over a year later having lost his crew to what he says was a hideous alien creature that boarded the probe – but the black box recorder never confirmed his story, and Cellini was cast aside, saved from discharge by Koenig’s insistence alone. But now Cellini says that the creature that attacked the Ultra Probe and killed his crew is still pursuing him – and when a graveyard of spacecraft is detected, including the jettisoned service module of the Ultra Probe (light years from where that module was actually left behind), it seems like Cellini’s discounted monster story may be terrifyingly real.

Order the DVDswritten by Christopher Penfold
directed by Charles Crichton
music by Barry Gray
additional music by Vic Elms

Guest Cast: Gianni Garko (Tony Cellini), Douglas Wilmer (Commissioner Dixon), Prentis Hancock (Paul Morrow), Clifton Jones (David Kano), Zienia Merton (Sandra Benes), Anton Phillips (Dr. Mathias), Nick Tate (Alan Carter), Barbara Kellerman (Dr. Monique Bouchere), Michael Sheard (Dr. Darwin King), Susan Jameson (Professor Juliet Mackie)

Notes: This is the first instance of Helena Russell doing a log entry in the series; it would become a staple feature of the second season. As of this episode, the Moon left Earth’s orbit 877 days ago.

LogBook entry by Earl Green