The Orville

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This topic contains 38 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by k8track k8track 3 weeks ago.

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  • #21709
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    I’m not really all that engaged with it, mainly because of the frat-boy humor that falls flat sometimes.

    I think that will be the biggest legitimate complaint of the show. It shows that they haven’t figured out the proper tone for the show. It also shows a major inconsistency in the show and, until they figure out what their tone is, they are going to lose viewers. At the very least the critics will not shut up. In fact, they may become more strident in their complaints.

    I haven’t gone as far as fast-forwarding past all the frat-boy humor but I might consider it in the future.

    #21731
    Steve W
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    Well, the last episode Into The Fold was pretty good. Just enough humor without overstaying its welcome or making my eyes roll. The thing that really stands out about this one was that the Doctor stated “they might not value life, but we do” at the end. But didn’t she stab and shoot a guy who hadn’t really harmed her earlier? A guy who was basically trying to protect her from cannibals? A bit hypocritical, Doc.

    A very Trek-ky episode, I liked it. Didn’t feel the need to fast-forward at all.

    #21735
    Earl
    Earl
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    The Orville has been renewed for a second season.

    #21743
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    Yes, she was harsh in that episode. Bad-ass, even. I did cringe a little when she made that little “value life” speech.

    “Into the Fold” didn’t have the stinging social commentary the previous episode did, but it did have a similar moral to the story. In “Majority Rule”, Lamar pulls a frat boy stunt while on a mission and is prosecuted for it by the native population. In “Into the Fold”, the Doctor’s kids act like, well, kids and cause the shuttle to fly out of control. The moral, of course, is “immature behavior is bad”. Or something like that.

    #22017
    Steve W
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    And here’s a teenage Seth Macfarlane and friends with a camcorder making their own Star Trek fan film.

    #25021
    Earl
    Earl
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    Three episodes into season two…any thoughts? Anyone still watching?

    The season premiere was…well, that was an interesting choice to lead off the season with an episode that barely leaves the ship, focusing almost entirely on relationships and whether or not members of the crew are pairing off. Not saying it was a bad choice, just an interesting one, especially as so little of it seemed to be played for outright laughs.

    The second episode went into some really surprising territory – sort of like the original Barclay episode but with less beating around the bush as to what societal ill was being addressed.

    Also, the state of California is trying to make a case for season 3 [LINK].

    Fox’s The Orville and Freeform’s Good Trouble are yet to launch their second and first season, respectively, but the series look well positioned to get a renewal for another season after that.

    In the latest round of California TV tax credits, Seth MacFarlane’s space dramedy was approved to receive $15.8 million for a third season, up from the $14.5 million incentive it got for Season 2. Good Trouble, a sequel to Freeform’s The Fosters, qualified for a $6.6 million Season 2 credit, up from $4.2 million for Season 1.

    While landing a tax credit does not guarantee a pickup, it makes it more likely. Both The Orville and Good Trouble already had been looking promising, with strong support from their networks.

    #25027
    k8track
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    I was quite taken aback by the latest episode (Home). I was not expecting that dark turn halfway through the episode, and was really shocked at the ending, and super bummed out. I also marveled at the lush visuals of this episode, which were absolutely stunning. I thought they did a remarkable job of the world-building of Xelaya. It was really convincing, both with the incredible scenery and explicitly demonstrating the acute danger of the heavy gravity on anything non-Xelayan — it is seriously no joke and you would instantly die horribly. It really was an emotional roller coaster, quite unexpected.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by k8track k8track.
    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by k8track k8track.
    #25177
    Earl
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    So… not a peep about the recent two-parter? I thought that was quite ambitious.

    My one beef with the basic plotline, however, is that if the Kaylons have “exceeded the informational capacity” of their home planet, doesn’t that basically mean “we need to take over another planet so we can turn it into a giant hard drive”? And if so, why choose somewhere as far away as Earth? I really felt a justification for specifically invading Earth was necessary (as opposed to, say, Moclus or Xelaya), and we didn’t get a good reason.

    #25188
    k8track
    k8track
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    One thing I didn’t find plausible is that after the Krill arrived and helped drive off the Kaylons, they didn’t turn their attention toward Earth and take advantage of their momentary weakness. I mean, it would be ripe for conquest at that point. Still, I like the hint that they may find common ground in the future. I really do appreciate that Seth is keeping it optimistic (and truer to the spirit of Star Trek than Discovery has done).

    It rankles me when I read articles about The Orville which STILL describe it as a comedy and/or parody of Star Trek. I hope that this recent two-parter will make them reassess that.

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