The Orville

This topic contains 33 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by ubikuberalles ubikuberalles 1 month ago.

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  • #21220
    Earl
    Earl
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    “the internet’s need to sling critisizm and put everything down as much as possible.”

    ^^ bingo.

    I’ve noticed on my Twitter feed a lot of pre-emptive bashing of Star Trek Discovery; I’ve also noticed it from sites like io9 too. After a few retweets I realized a frequently-cited source was emerging as the person making claims that got everyone riled up…

    …and it’s none other than the guy who was going to direct Axanar.

    You know…if I were to make something new…I’d probably just put it on Youtube with no fanfare. See if anyone discovers it and spreads the word. But announce its existence beforehand and let people have time to form opinions for or against something they’ve never seen? Nope.

    #21261
    Steve W
    Steve W
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    CBS isn’t allowing critics to see it and review it ahead of its air date. That’s upsetting a few people, since that’s traditionally a way for studios to protect a bad movie or show from terrible word-of-mouth before it airs.

    I still haven’t joined up to CBS’s site. Maybe I’ll support them if the first episode turns out to be promising.

    #21345
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    Ugh. I just posted a three or four paragraph post on the Orville and criticisms about Seth’s lack of Originality and it never showed up here. What’s going on?

    #21350
    Earl
    Earl
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    You were trying to post that shortly before I updated bbPress today (which was necessary due to a major WordPress update a day or so ago). It’s possible that the board was broken in the interim, or you may have tried to post at exactly the same time I triggered the update.

    #21468
    Steve W
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    Episode 4 was the most Star-Trekky episode yet. A giant generational ship that the people inside have forgotten was a spaceship, a lunatic with crazy religious ideals oppressing the people, and a happy ending tied up in a nice bow. I’m confused by how McFarlane keeps getting unexpected guest-stars in to do a little cameo. This episode it was Liam Neeson, of all people. Plus, the gruff voiced town elder was played by James Morrison, who played Lt. Colonel McQueen from Space: Above and Beyond. I really like seeing actors from various sci-fi shows pop up like that.

    #21474
    Earl
    Earl
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    Just watched this one.

    MacFarlane just totally did his own Starlost here, didn’t he? I always said it was a fantastic premise if produced properly.

    Don’t anybody tell Harlan.

    #21496

    k8track
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    Earl, I’m of the same mind. I remember when I first heard of The Starlost when some hard core sci-fi nut friends of mine were telling me about it. I remember thinking what an incredible concept that would be. I’ve never seen it, so I can’t judge as to the quality of the produced episodes. I really loved this newest episode of The Orville, very well done. I bet Harlan would like it.

    #21497
    Earl
    Earl
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    I bet Harlan’s attorneys would like it. :p

    #21502
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    All Seth’s lawyers have to say in response to Harlan’s lawyers is: “We didn’t steal the idea from Starlost, we stole it from Heinlein’s novel Orphan’s of the Sky! Suck it!”

    Then it devolves into a shouting match: “Then maybe Heinlein’s estate should sue you!” “Well, maybe, Heinlein’s estate should sue Harlan too!” And so on.

    —–

    The only thing missing from the latest episode is a crazy old man talking about when he climbed the tallest mountain in the land and he was able to touch the sky.

    —–

    I always said it was a fantastic premise if produced properly.

    By my count there are at least three versions of this premise on TV. If I had the energy or the motivation, I’m sure I could find more.

    Here are the four I know about:
    – “For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky” from Star Trek is the earliest TV version I can think of.
    – Starlost, of course.
    – Episode 4 of the Orville (I forget the name of the episode)
    – “Ascension” a recent TV series where a multi-generation ship is launched by the U.S.A. in the early 1960’s.

    All three feature these themes (or elements):

    – Multi-generational spaceship that is adrift or off course.
    – Population ignorant that they live in a spaceship and that what they see is their entire universe.
    – Population is ruled by a dictatorship that uses religion to keep the population ignorant.

    Starlost, I think, does the best job of introducing the situation to the audience. We, the audience, are just as ignorant of what is going on as the protagonists. Through a series of events, we slowly discover what is going on. What this does is help us relate more to, not only the protagonist, but also the other characters in the show.

    In the other two shows, we know immediately what is going on. The inhabitants are immediately pigeonholed as religious dolts living in ignorance. It diminishes them and that makes me a little sad. At least, in Star Trek, we can see how the population is ignorant as the dictatorship is very effective weaving mythology, technology and religion to keep the populace from finding out the truth. The dictatorship in Orville? Not so much. It’s a small area (790 square kilometers) so they should easily find the encampment of the opposition which sits in plain sight. The end result is I don’t fully believe the current regime would have lasted as the opposition would have taken over decades ago.

    It is one of the better shows, however. Production values are high and some of the scenes were effective. I think they wasted valuable script on dumb gags like the blob trying to seduce the doctor and Seth spitting into a napkin. Filler space that could have been done more effectively.

    ——

    If you like this sub-genre, there are a bunch of novels that use it. The earliest one I can think of is Heinlein’s “Orphans of the Sky” (1941). A more recent example is Greg Bear’s “Hull Zero Three”. Other novels that have some of the elements I described – but not all – are “Rendezvous with Rama” by Clarke and “Solaris” by Kim Stanley Robinson. Hugh Howey’s “Wool” series has all the ear marks of this sub-genre except they’re not in a spaceship but a great underground complex. There are plenty more, I’m sure, but those are the ones that come immediately to mind.

    #21503
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    One more thought on that episode: when they opened the skylight and darkness descended, Asimov’s novella “Nightfall” came to mind. Anyone else think that? Anyone? Bueller?

    #21508
    Steve W
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    And yet, in Nightfall, the people set their houses on fire just to have light, whereas in this episode the artificial sunlight shuttered away and you could see the little city was instantly lit with torches or something. From people who had never seen night before. That jumped right out at me. It looked nice, but it really should have been dark. Nobody was expecting that to happen, so they couldn’t have had alternative lighting ready to go.

    #21546
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    Who’s to say they didn’t light their houses on fire? After all, we only see the lights from a great distance.

    #21553
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    I can say without hesitation that “Pria” has been the best episode to date. I really can’t find any fault with it. I really enjoyed it.

    #21679
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    So the Krill episode was interesting. The main issue with the episode – which is my main criticism of the show – is the juxtaposition of the infantile humor with the seriousness of the subject matter. Here we have the captain and the helmsman acting like a bunch of frat boys and dumb guys in front of the Krill and the Krill don’t seem to notice. In a more realistic show, the Krill would have been immediately suspicious of those two acting in a very non-Krill manner and would throw them in the brig just in case. No doubt they did that for comedic effect but I don’t think it worked so well. Nevertheless, I liked this episode. Can’t go wrong when the last words spoken was a direct quote from Yoda.

    I think they definitely hit their stride with “Majority Rule”. The juxtaposition I was complaining about was put to good use when Lt. LaMarr got arrested for doing his frat boy shtick in public. Stinging social commentary, I must say. As good as – if not better – than the episode in Black Mirror that slammed social media (Episode 1 in series 3 titled “Nosedive”).

    #21692
    Steve W
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    I have been watching The Orville, but I find myself fast-forwarding through it in places. I’m not really all that engaged with it, mainly because of the frat-boy humor that falls flat sometimes. On the other side of the coin though, I think Discovery has gotten better now that they’re getting a stride going.

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