The hazards of live launch coverage

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  • #26030
    EarlEarl
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    We’ve all gotten used to the really slick live launch coverage from the likes of SpaceX, Blue Origin, and so on. Europe’s ArianeSpace has tried to hump the leg of that trend, but this launch coverage from July 7th shows that, in trying to stick to the tightly-scripted coverage complete with CG rockets showing what’s going on once the booster is no longer visible to cameras…the PIO doing the announcing needs to be kept abreast of major developments such as the fact that the rocket has exploded, destroying the payload, and that all is not going as well as the animation shows.

    The actual launch occurs about 14 minutes in, and the whole thing is just kind of forehead-slappingly painful to watch by the time you reach the end.


    #26230
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    The PIO should also monitor the launch graph in the upper right of the screen to see right away that there was an issue. Right away you can see the rocket was not gaining altitude after a certain point.

    I still think the most awkward moment was during the Challenger disaster when, after we all saw the shuttle explode, NASA personnel reacting and the crowd confused and sobbing, we hear: “RSO reports vehicle exploded.”

    #26231
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    Also, apologies for the necro bump. I obviously don’t visit this site as much as I should.

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