Star Trek: Discovery – it’s another prequel

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This topic contains 88 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  k8track 1 week, 1 day ago.

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  • #2051

    See the SDCC trailer here.

    So… is this named after or ?

    And if you’re thinking the ship looks familiar… it’s because it kinda does.

    A series set between Enterprise and Kirk-era Trek certainly puts a different complexion on the lawsuit over Axanar, doesn’t it?

    #9256

    Right on cue, Robert Meyer Burnett, the guy who was going to direct Axanar is already being an asshole on Twitter.

    RMB @ #SDCC ‏@BurnettRM
    I’m very, very excited about @BryanFuller’s new STD. I can’t wait to experience everything it has to offer.

    David Mack ‏@DavidAlanMack
    @BurnettRM – For future reference, the preferred abbreviation for the new series is DSC — sans context, some folks misinterpret “STD.”

    RMB @ #SDCC ‏@BurnettRM
    I’ve just been schooled. Officially, TREK abbreviations are TOS, TNG, DS9, VOY, ENT and now…DSC. I’d loved to have been in THAT meeting.

    #9257
    Steve W
    Steve W
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    It’s not identical to McQuarrie’s design, but it’s close. They at least made it slightly more Star Trek-ky. It has a Klingon vibe to it, which is interesting. It’d be unusual if it were a joint creation of the Klingons and Federation. I just wish it didn’t look like it was made of brass. I prefer the clean, white ship hulls of TMP Enterprise and Reliant, personally.

    I don’t care about prequels or anything, the Trek universe is a rich setting to create a space opera in, no matter what time period it’s set in. I hope they still go with the idea to change ships, crews, and eras with each season. It’s a good way to keep from stagnating the creative pool and tell better stories.

    #9258

    As already pointed out, we’ve seen the discovery before – the design is based heavily on Ralph McQuarrie designs (ultimately abandoned) for the refit Enterprise that would’ve been seen in a movie called Star Trek: Planet of the Titans sometime in 1976 or ’77.

    But wait – there’s evidence of this class of ship on screen already! Paramount build a study model of McQuarrie’s ship way back when.

    Not only was it deployed as part of the Wolf 359 fleet (its “wreckage” was filmed as a distant background object for Best of Both Worlds Part II), but you can see the same study model in spacedock in Star Trek III.

    Which brings us to some of the data points we know about Discovery (the show, not the ship):

    • It takes place in the “Prime Timeline” of TOS, TNG, DS9, Voyager, Enterprise, not the “Kelvin Timeline” of the Abrams movies (specifically confirmed by Fuller in yesterday’s SDCC panel).
    • Writers on board already: Bryan Fuller (showrunner), Nicholas Meyer (Star Trek II / VI co-writer/director), Kirsten Beyer (Voyager novelist), Joe Menosky (TNG/Voyager writer), Aron Eli Coleite (Heroes, Crossing Jordan)
    • Following the current format of “binge-worthy” TV such as Game Of Thrones, etc., it will be one continuous story “told in chapters like a novel” (said by Fuller in yesterday’s SDCC panel).
    • David Semel (The Man In The High Castle, Madam Secretary, American Horror Story, House, Buffy, Hemlock Grove, many others) directs the pilot. Semel was also a producer on Heroes, which seems to be the linchpin of Fuller’s handpicked staff, but he was also the director of the godawful unsold NBC pilot “Rex Is Not Your Lawyer” starring…David Tennant with an awful, awful American accent. Small world, yeah? 😆
    #9259
    Steve W
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    But this isn’t going to be the same ship design – there are differences. For one, the warp nacelles don’t look like toilet paper tubes. They seem to be integrated into the “wings” rather than offset above them. And the secondary hull isn’t a delta shape, it’s a little better. All in all, it has a bit of a Klingon design, which the harsh music playing in the background emphasizes. I wonder how relevant that is.

    #9260

    CBS’ official Engage podcast has done something really neat for once and has dropped the full audio of the SDCC panel here.

    #9261

    k8track
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    You know, why even set it in the “Prime” timeline or “Kelvin” timeline at all? Those are but only two of an infinite number of quantum realities. (See the excellent TNG 7th season episode “Parallels.”) Why not explore a completely different reality? It could be an “alternate” 24th century (“alternate” is relative; everything else compared to your own reality is always an alternate possibility).

    The thing that really bothers me is that if you do yet another prequel in the “prime” universe, you are automatically constrained and mostly beholden to the continuity of said timeline. There is some wiggle room, but you would have far more freedom if you had a series set in the far future that we’ve never seen before. Then it really would be where no bag of mostly water has gone before. Or as I’ve said, set a series in a completely different quantum reality.

    #9262

    It would be advantageous to the budget to set it in a quantum reality where, instead of humans, Starfleet consists mostly of sentient Doritos.

    I love Parallels. They could’ve stretched that out to four parts and it wouldn’t have worn it out.

    I think the safety valve here is that it isn’t the Enterprise or a Enterprise (an Enterprise?). It would be the height of hubris to assume that Jim Kirk or Jonathan Archer, et al., got all the important assignments, or that we’ve even seen the most important developments of that era (or just before it) unfold. This is why, honestly, I preferred the “original” fan film crews – Exeter, Farragut, Intrepid, etc. – to the “we’re doing season 4 of TOS” efforts. The basic parameters of the universe are known, but other than that the sky’s the limit.

    #9263
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    You’d think they’d learned their lesson from ST:ENT, the nadir of the Start Trek franchise in both story telling and ratings.It’s why – I think – they went with the alternate time-line with the new movies: it opens up the possibilities (which they ruined with ST:Into Darkness). I suppose it is possible to open the possibilities with a prequel. They made an attempt in ST:ENT by having that time war thing. But it seemed like they were unwilling to change the original time-line and so, in the end, everything went back to what it was before. If someone had the balls to say “Screw the original time-line! Let’s make this thing our own!” we would have had a lot more interesting TV series and – despite the controversy it would have caused – it would have improved ratings. The Xindi bit looked like one of those things that would radically changed the time-line but that got boring surprisingly fast.

    If they can get the new show to open up the possibilities (time travel, alternate universe etc. etc.) then I think they’ll be able to get good ratings.Of course, the characters and stories have to be good too which is another problem ST:ENT had but I digress.

    #9264

    I think it’s worth pointing out that the Temporal Cold War was one of those things that UPN imposed upon Enterprise. The network broke out in a cold sweat about it being a prequel, so they wanted it to also be a sequel to TNG/DS9//VOY.

    By the way…the official account for Axanar is frantically retweeting their Loyal True Believer Followers’ tweets that Discovery is ripping off Axanar by taking place in that same between-Enterprise-and-TOS-but-closer-to-TOS time frame. 🙄 Though I will admit to some slight discomfort about which is the chicken and which is the egg. Did CBS ask Bryan Fuller to set it in that point in the timeline specifically to torpedo Axanar, or did Fuller see a story that he felt needed telling in that time frame, and offing Axanar was just an unintended beneficial side effect for CBS?

    #9265

    k8track
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    I’ve always regarded Parallels as one of the major linchpins in the entire Trek universe (as well as being one of the very few bright spots of a dismal seventh season of TNG). To me, it was the Rosetta Stone that finally explained pretty much everything. Now that we know that there are an infinite amount of parallel, quantum realities (each differing from the other ever so slightly, such as, for example, when two of them share exactly the same history for billions of years except that one time when someone had chocolate cake in Reality X vs. when someone had yellow cake in Reality Y, on just a single occasion), this neatly explains every single episode ever. In other words, don’t worry if there are slight (or not so slight) continuity glitches from one episode to the next… every single episode could just be considered to be set in a slightly different quantum reality. There is no “prime” universe!

    I loved it so much, and it also totally explained, to me, every other TV show and movie ever. It totally reconciled continuity errors in all my favorite TV shows, particularly The Simpsons, where the location of Springfield is fluid, and the characters never age. Each and every episode simply takes place in a different quantum reality.

    Also, they’re just TV shows so it doesn’t really matter.

    #9266

    @k8track wrote:

    every single episode could just be considered to be set in a slightly different quantum reality. There is no “prime” universe!

    Damn. You pretty much just guessed one of the essays from WARP!2 (the TNG book).

    I’m just trying to put enough stuff into the blender to come up with enough dekyon particles to escape the Trumpiverse.

    #9267

    k8track
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    @earl wrote:

    enough dekyon particles

    Three.

    #9268
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    Yep. You nailed it, Kevin. It’s all a bunch of different universes and we, as an audience, don’t really know which one a particular episode is set in. We really shouldn’t worry our little heads about it and shut up and just watch the show (and buy their sponsors products).

    EDIT: Or maybe, the writers are from different versions of our universe. In their universe, the scripts they wrote are entirely consistent with the show in their universe. But then, just before they submit the scripts, they shifts into our universe! D’oh! The script writers don’t realize what has happened until long after the episodes have gone into production and by then it is too late, especially if (or when) the writers slip back to their original universe or yet another universe.

    Yes! That’s what’s going on! That’s the ticket! By the way, have you met my lovely wife? Morgan Fairchild?

    #9269
    Steve W
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    I would personally love to see the Four Years War storyline that Axanar was going to be about instead be developed on Discovery. That’d be a big ol’ middle finger to the Axanar guys for one, and we’d finally get to see a professional take on that moment in Starfleet history. It would also explain why the Discovery looks a bit Klingon, because it might be designed with stolen Klingon technology and its sole purpose is to destroy Klingon heavy cruisers.

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