Ready Player One

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  • #1338
    ZLothZLoth
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    As usual, unabridged.
    @Publisher Summery wrote:

    At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, Ready Player One is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

    It’s the year 2044, and the real world is an ugly place.

    Like most of humanity, Wade Watts escapes his grim surroundings by spending his waking hours jacked into the OASIS, a sprawling virtual utopia that lets you be anything you want to be, a place where you can live and play and fall in love on any of 10,000 planets.

    And like most of humanity, Wade dreams of being the one to discover the ultimate lottery ticket that lies concealed within this virtual world. For somewhere inside this giant networked playground, OASIS creator James Halliday has hidden a series of fiendish puzzles that will yield massive fortune—and remarkable power—to whoever can unlock them.

    For years, millions have struggled fruitlessly to attain this prize, knowing only that Halliday’s riddles are based in the pop culture he loved—that of the late 20th century. And for years, millions have found in this quest another means of escape, retreating into happy, obsessive study of Halliday’s icons. Like many of his contemporaries, Wade is as comfortable debating the finer points of John Hughes’s oeuvre, playing Pac-Man, or reciting Devo lyrics as he is scrounging power to run his OASIS rig.

    And then Wade stumbles upon the first puzzle.

    Suddenly the whole world is watching, and thousands of competitors join the hunt—among them certain powerful players who are willing to commit very real murder to beat Wade to this prize. Now the only way for Wade to survive and preserve everything he knows is to win. But to do so, he may have to leave behind his oh-so-perfect virtual existence and face up to life—and love—in the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

    A world at stake.
    A quest for the ultimate prize.
    Are you ready?

    ©2011 Ernest Cline (P)2011 Random House Audio

    Hello lot and lots of 1980s references.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #6828
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    I have the book in my Kindle. I started reading it back in March-April time frame. It didn’t hold my attention the first few pages. I’ll try again sometime. In the meantime I’m reading book three of Pratchett’s Long Earth series: The Long Mars.

    #6829
    ZLothZLoth
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    Here is the Ready Player One Wiki for all of the references.

    I will have to admit, this book does start out slowly as the author sets all the pieces up. The pace does not pick up until the protagonist, Wade Watts, actually gets the second key. However, the setup is key in enjoying the book, and I enjoyed all of the references from the 1970s/1980s and early computer history. Not only the obvious references are there, but some of the more obscure ones as well (Supaidāman anyone?). More importantly, it got all of the references RIGHT, and, as a child of the eighties, it was very hard for me to spot errors. I do have to admit that the author went overboard near the end with the final battle. They are actually working on adapting this to a movie, although I have to wonder how they are going to get all the rights.

    OK, I had to smile as Wil Wheaton, who is the narrator of this book, references himself and Cory Doctorow at one point.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by ZLoth.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by ZLothZLoth. Reason: Updated Short URL
    #6830
    ZLothZLoth
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    From Ars Technica:

    Spielberg on board for film adaptation of geek-centric Ready Player One
    Director who grew to fame in the ’80s fittingly tapped to direct ’80s-obsessed story

    According to an exclusive report by Deadline, director Steven Spielberg is headed back to the big chair to direct the film adaptation of Ernest Cline’s ’80s-geek-gasm novel Ready Player One. The movie will be Spielberg’s first for Warner Brothers in 14 years; the last time he made a movie at the studio was 2001’s A.I.

    The novel Ready Player One, released in 2011, is set in a near future obsessed with ’80s pop culture thanks to a treasure hunt in a global MMORPG/MUD/MUSH called “The OASIS.” The treasure hunt is centered around clues cloaked beneath layers of ’70s and ’80s ephemera—mainly movies, TV, video games, and music—with a multi-billion dollar prize waiting for the first person to solve all the puzzles. Centered on the character Wade Watts, a poor kid who rockets to fame near the beginning of the book when he solves the first major clue in the “Egg Hunt,” Ready Player One is a non-stop barrage of movie and TV quotes and references—at times coming so heavily that it’s hard to see the plot forest for the (Day-Glo green) trees.

    FULL ARTICLE HERE


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #26915
    ZLothZLoth
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    I still haven’t watched the Ready Player One movie. However, I did download the Ready Player Two audiobook on release day (November 24th), and thanks to work, I wasn’t able to listen to until this past week. I took a trip to Uncertain, TX and back, then to Tulsa, OK to the Center of the Universe and back just for some alone time to listen to the book. Yes, it does build upon from the first book, although it does take put away some of the possible plot crutches from the first book. The is a very interesting twist that occurs in the middle of the second book that I won’t spoil here. Needless to say, if you enjoyed the first book, you will enjoy the second book. I’m just hoping there isn’t a Ready Player Three.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #26919
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    Been a while since I visited this thread. Since then I’ve read the book and watched the movie. I liked he book but I was getting weary of the constant 1980s references. Obviously this book was written for those in Earl’s and Rob O’Hara’s generation, who grew up in the ’80s. I was in my 20s in the ’80s and therefore less nostalgic for that era (I’m not much of a nostalgic person, in general). I would think Rob would like all the 80’s references. Perhaps he and Earl are the target audience. Stranger Things is big on the 80’s references too but not as much, I think, as Ready Player one.

    I liked the movie too, though not as much as the book. Not as many 80’s references in the movie, for obvious licensing reasons. Consequently, video game and pop culture characters that were in the book were not in the movie and vice versa. The book had lots of exposition, especially dialogue about how the protagonist went about solving some of the puzzles in the game. That would not do in a movie so a different approach was required. I found the movie’s approach clever but I felt cheated out of how the protagonist figured this stuff out.

    I’m not in a hurry to read the second book since I felt the first book tied everything up in a nice little bow. I also heard the book got some poor reviews. No doubt, if I hear that the movie is being worked on and is imminent, I’ll start reading the book. I thought I had it on my Amazon wish list when I first heard about the book. It’s on the list now.

    #26921
    ZLothZLoth
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    I will admit that I went into the book “blind” partially because I pre-ordered it to take advantage of a Audible promotion. Yup, there are more 80s references, including one where I was heading off to Wikipedia to look up Ninja Princess and the artist Rieko Kodama. Is it better than the first book? No, and I see where the criticisms are based upon. I still enjoyed it, but if, at the end, I’m really not wanting more, that’s a bad sign.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

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