NES Classic Edition

This topic contains 29 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Flack 6 months ago.

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  • #2026

    This will sell ELEVENTY BRAZILION UNITS. [LINK]

    REDMOND, Wash.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–If you see a Nintendo Entertainment System on store shelves this holiday shopping season, you haven’t entered a time machine. (Unless everyone around you is wearing acid-washed jeans and neon leg warmers. If that’s the case, you may have unknowingly walked through a rift in the space-time continuum.) The most likely scenario is you are setting eyes on the Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition, launching in stores on Nov. 11 at a suggested retail price of $59.99. That’s right: The NES is back! But this isn’t the same NES that you fondly remember. This new nostalgia-fueled system is a near-identical, mini replica of Nintendo’s original home console and plugs directly into your high-definition TV using an included HDMI cable. The console comes complete with 30 NES games built in, including beloved classics like Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Metroid, Donkey Kong, PAC-MAN, and Kirby’s Adventure.

    “We wanted to give fans of all ages the opportunity to revisit Nintendo’s original system and rediscover why they fell in love with Nintendo in the first place,” said Nintendo of America President and COO Reggie Fils-Aime. “The Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition is ideal for anyone who remembers playing the NES, or who wants to pass on those nostalgic memories to the next generation of gamers.”

    The system comes packaged with an HDMI cable, an AC adapter and one NES Classic Controller, which is patterned after the iconic design of the original NES controller. But you really just want to know the full list of 30 games, right? Feast your eyes on the fantastic collection of NES classics included with each and every system:

    Balloon Fight™
    BUBBLE BOBBLE
    Castlevania™
    Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest™
    Donkey Kong™
    Donkey Kong Jr. ™
    DOUBLE DRAGON II: THE REVENGE
    Dr. Mario™
    Excitebike™
    FINAL FANTASY®
    Galaga™
    GHOSTS’N GOBLINS®
    GRADIUS™
    Ice Climber™
    Kid Icarus™
    Kirby’s Adventure™
    Mario Bros. ™
    MEGA MAN® 2
    Metroid™
    NINJA GAIDEN
    PAC-MAN™
    Punch-Out!! ™ Featuring Mr. Dream
    StarTropics™
    SUPER C™
    Super Mario Bros.™
    Super Mario Bros. ™ 2
    Super Mario Bros. ™ 3
    TECMO BOWL
    The Legend of Zelda™
    Zelda II: The Adventure of Link™

    There’s a little something for everyone: a nice mix of timeless favorites, cult classics and maybe even some games that you never got around to playing. Each is sure to bring back memories and produce plenty of new ones. You can even enjoy playing several of these games with two players by attaching a second NES Classic Controller, which will be sold separately at a suggested retail price of $9.99. A Classic Controller or Classic Controller Pro can also be used (each sold separately).

    When connected to a Wii Remote controller, the NES Classic Controller can also be used to play Virtual Console NES games on a Wii U or Wii system. Playing these retro games using a retro controller makes the experience that much more authentic. And if you ever need to step away from the NES Classic Edition in the middle of a tough level (or take a break to call one of Nintendo’s helpful Game Counselors*), don’t worry about losing any hard-earned progress. Each game has multiple suspend points, so you can start where you left off at a later time, no passwords needed.

    What’s old is new again with the Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition. Relive past glories. Finish off that boss you never beat. Save the galaxy and rescue the princess!

    *Please only call if you have indeed entered a time machine. The Game Counselor program no longer exists in 2016.

    Since Nintendo can afford to license stuff like Mega Man and Pac-Man and Bubble Bobble, this is the strongest game lineup I have ever seen on a plug-and-play. And since the NES is now the epicenter of what people regard as classic gaming, I bet this’ll be on the hot Christmas toy list.

    Wouldn’t it be funny if THIS is the Nintendo NX? No new groundbreaking tech. Screw ’em. They just want to play Mario and Kirby and Zelda and stuff? Give ’em what they want. 😆

    #9212
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    No Duck Hunt…so FORGET IT! 👿 👿 👿

    Ya, well, I’ll probably get it, but only after I get my portable Atari Flashback.

    The timing is perfect for Nintendo as the interest in NES games has gone way up in the past few years. No doubt those who spent their childhood playing NES now have real jobs and are willing to spend their disposable income on NES stuff and relive their childhood. This NES classic will appeal to those who don’t want to go through the effort of scanning eBay listings, thrifting, perusing garage sales or attending video game conventions.

    The criticisms of the new NES have already been flying: non-standard USB connections, lack of slot for carts and so on. There was already talk of hacking the machine so new ROMs could be added to hold even more games. At the very least Nintendo has sparked a lot of interest in the NES.

    #9213
    Steve W
    Steve W
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    This is how you put out a Flashback-style retro game console.

    If you want to sell it to more than just game enthusiasts, put the effort out and license games for it. Don’t just throw a bunch of ancient, forgotten titles that you just happen to own on it as filler, make deals with publishers and get the highest quality games that came out for the original console and put the cream of the crop on your retro machine. I’m estimating that this thing will sell more units by Christmas than the Atari Flashback series has in all its variations. Why? Because they’re concentrating on games that people actually want to play, not just games that are cheap or free to license.

    #9214

    Well, you say that, but I’m already hearing complaints mounting about how there’s Super C with no Contra, Castlevania I & II but not the third game, and so on. I will admit that the omission of Contra is a little surprising considering what else they did license for inclusion here. Perhaps Konami decided to be the holdout and tried to hold that title ransom.

    #9215
    Steve W
    Steve W
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    @earl wrote:

    Well, you say that, but I’m already hearing complaints mounting about how there’s Super C with no Contra, Castlevania I & II but not the third game, and so on. I will admit that the omission of Contra is a little surprising considering what else they did license for inclusion here. Perhaps Konami decided to be the holdout and tried to hold that title ransom.

    I thought Castlevania III was one of those titles that never seemed to work with Famiclone technology. I would imagine that’s what they’re using in this, since it’s readily available and has been refined over a couple decades for maximum cost savings. And who knows, the original Contra might be a secret, hidden game or something. But most likely, they had a certain amount of memory to use on games so they couldn’t include every game in a series and instead chose one game from it that is considered the best from that line. So, instead of Mega Man 1 through 6, it’s just 2. Double Dragon II instead of the original. That kind of thing. Or whatever games used the same strain of enhancement/memory chip.

    #9216

    Flack
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    I’ve been chewing on this news story for a couple of days now, trying to process it.

    We, or at least I, tend to view these things from a different point of view than other people. My knee jerk reaction was, “who in their right mind would pay $60 for a Nintendo on a Chip emulating a few games?” We’ve done this before and it didn’t go well. I then went into my old man mode about how anyone who wants to play these games either (a) already owns an NES and already has them, or (b) has downloaded an emulator and the ROMs and is playing them for free. Between computers, Raspberry Pis, tablets, phones, and modded consoles, I could easily have a dozen people over and let them all play Super Mario Bros. 3 on their console of choice.

    After convincing myself that Nintendo wouldn’t sell a single one of these things, I showed it to my wife. Her two words were “awesome” and “cute!” She rattled off a few games and a couple of her favorites were missing (Gauntlet and Tetris, for obvious Atari-related reasons) but the rest (Bubble Bobble, Dr. Mario, and Super Mario Bros.) were all there. She sees the systems built in game library as a plus, not a minus (like me) and likes that it’s HDMI so “there won’t be cords everywhere.” Harumph.

    To me $60 sounds high, but my head is stuck in old day pricing. I just checked Craigslist and the cheapest NES I found was $75. Ones with new pin adapters are $100, and there are bundles with a few games for $200. I’m sure not all of those will sell at those prices, but suddenly $60 seems… affordable? Especially if you were planning on buying these particular 30 games.

    I guess the market is non-computer fans of Nintendo, and people with wives and kids who don’t want to jump through hoops to play these games. I’m sure these will fly off the shelves and end up in stockings everywhere this holiday season.

    #9217

    @flack wrote:

    After convincing myself that Nintendo wouldn’t sell a single one of these things, I showed it to my wife. Her two words were “awesome” and “cute!” She rattled off a few games and a couple of her favorites were missing (Gauntlet and Tetris, for obvious Atari-related reasons) but the rest (Bubble Bobble, Dr. Mario, and Super Mario Bros.) were all there. She sees the systems built in game library as a plus, not a minus (like me) and likes that it’s HDMI so “there won’t be cords everywhere.” Harumph.

    You and I are not the target audience for this. I have a PC that outputs to my HDTV, that runs NEStopia, that can probably run 300 NES and Famicom games. If I want, I have a USB NES controller that I can plug in for absolute controller fidelity.

    Will I wind up getting one of these? Almost certainly, because the emulator, though already set up and optimized for this display and these controllers, is one more hoop than my kid wants to jump through to play SMB3. I’ll almost certainly wind up buying one.

    All Nintendo had to do was wait a few years for emulation to become a serious-hobbyist-only thing – let’s face it, configuring an emulator on a PC or even a phone is a set of hoops too many for most people to jump through – and then they win the emulation war.

    #9218

    Flack
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    AtGames has announced they are re-releasing their Sega Genesis console this Christmas as well.

    Details are a little sketchy at the moment depending on the source, but it sounds like it will contain 40 built in games, and a cartridge slot, AND an SD CART SLOT. I’m getting conflicting reports as to whether or not it will play roms off of that SD cart slot but if so… yowza!

    Also one thing to note is that on the previous AtGames Genesis console, the sound was really bad. I’m hoping they fix it this time around.

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/gaming/sega-portable-plug-and-play-genesis/

    #9219
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    @earl wrote:

    You and I are not the target audience for this.

    This.

    Us and the people we see and know who are interested in NES games go to thrift stores, hunt for NES rarities on eBay (or forums or other sites), talk about NES games and emulators on forums, go to video game conventions and so on. These are high end NES fans who have gone the extra mile to enjoy their hobby. The target audience are the vast majority of people who would just like to relive their childhood a little and would buy the NES Classic Edition if they saw it in a store or online and would not go much further than that to play old NES games. Does the emulated game play different than the original? They wouldn’t know or care about that. The colors of the emulated game could be different from the original and most of the buyers wouldn’t notice. They are not into it like we are.

    You probably knew that from reading Earl’s brief sentence on the matter but I just wanted to make sure the horse was dead (/me puts away beating club).

    #9220
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    Just saw this story on how Amazon will handle the sales on Friday at 2 PM.

    Hmmmm….. I wonder if Nintendo is creating an artificial shortage in order to make this the “hot-but-hard-to-get” toy of this Christmas season… all to the ire of parents everywhere. This will help keep it at the list price too.

    #9221

    Either that, or they’re underestimating/misunderstanding the audience for this.

    As everyone seems to be. *shrug*

    #9222

    Flack
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    Whatever they’re doing, it’s working. I’m seeing people on my FB feed who are camping out for the thing.

    #9223
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    🙄

    😆

    After New Years, surprise the price drops and the stock is more available.

    [attachment=0:2rjadfic]Schwarzenegger-JingleAllTheWay-595×347.png[/attachment:2rjadfic]

    #9224
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    From Ars Techica:

    Low supply, high demand drives NES Classic Edition resale price up 200%
    $60 system, which didn’t offer pre-orders, reselling for $180 or more online

    Anyone who doubts the huge market power of Nintendo nostalgia would do well to look at the resale market for the miniature NES Classic Edition today, on the morning of the console’s release. Ars’ analysis of the 100 most recent successful eBay sales sees the tiny HDMI-powered unit, which comes pre-loaded with 30 classic NES games, going for an average price of $183.52.

    That’s a more than 200-percent markup over the Classic Edition’s $59.99 retail price (the median resale price on eBay is a comparable $179.99). And that average doesn’t even include the single most lucrative auction we’ve seen for the console, which drew $499.99 from at least one buyer.

    FULL ARTICLE HERE

    #9225

    Amazon is having…difficulties…offering this item right now. 😆 I pulled the page up just to watch, and holy cow, they’re having problems.

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