Hyperspace (Don Davis / Dragon’s Domain Records)

Hailing frequencies open… Forums Media Music Soundtracks Hyperspace (Don Davis / Dragon’s Domain Records)

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    Earl
    Earl
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    This is an utter obscurity whose soundtrack I would never have expected to get a commercial release. [LINK]
    Hyperspace

    One of the first feature length STAR WARS parodies, HYPERSPACE came out in 1984. Known in England as GREMLOIDS and as GREMLORDS in France and Germany, HYPERSPACE was writer/director Todd Durham’s second and last film as director, working with ambitiously cost-conscious low-budget producer Earl Owensby. The movie was released in September 1984, but it wasn’t until 1988 that the film received a wider release on home video.

    Starring comedians Chris Elliott and Paula Poundstone and filmed in North Carolina, HYPERSPACE imitates STAR WARS in context and execution from its opening text crawl into infinity to its inscrutable helmeted monarch of menace, Lord Buckethead (played by Robert Bloodworth, but voiced by Barry Cooper).

    “Obviously the movie was a parody of STAR WARS, so the only approach to music I could logically take was similarly a parody of John Williams’s work,” said Davis in an exclusive new interview for the album notes. “I got as close to STAR WARS as I could get without it being STAR WARS.” Davis provided the right kind of feeling to the music which gave the score a suitably grandiose dynamic and aided in the film’s parodist nature.

    The composer’s approach to supporting the film’s inherent humor was based on “not writing funny music,” but scoring the movie with absolute seriousness, thereby allowing the parody to exist within the film and among its characters in a world where even the most farcical of circumstances are treated with genuine integrity. “The concept of playing it straight, as if the show were not a comedy, was what we wanted to do with our movie,” said Davis. “We treated it as if it really was STAR WARS and everything was completely serious.”

    I have to admit, I’m curious.

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