How Arcade1Up found a sweet spot for scaled-down home game cabinets

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  • #26296
    ZLothZLoth
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    From Ars Technica:

    How Arcade1Up found a sweet spot for scaled-down home game cabinets

    Back in June 2017, Tastemakers CEO Scott Bachrach was at a meeting discussing a hole in the ever-expanding market for retro games. Specifically, there was no cheap and easy middle ground for a generation of classic arcade fans who wanted an authentic cabinet in their home.

    “We looked and said there are ‘under $100’ solutions, [but they] don’t really feel like a real arcade,” Bachrach began in a recent phone interview with Ars. “There are $3,000 solutions that feel like a real arcade, but they’re $3,000 and 300 pounds. How do we make something that is affordable to the masses but gives you the same play as a real arcade?”

    From that meeting, the Arcade1Up line was born. Beginning in 2018, Tastemakers launched a series of 3/4-scale replica arcade cabinets, each with a handful of emulated games and a $300 to $400 price tag. The initial batch focused on Bachrach’s personal wheelhouse: ’70s and ’80s classics from companies like Namco (Pac-Man, Galaga), Midway (Rampage, Defender), and Atari (Asteroids, Tempest). Soon though, the line expanded into the ’90s with Street Fighter II and Mortal Kombat-themed machines, a move Bachrach called a “natural progression.”

    “We looked and said, ‘What are the best-selling arcade games?'” Bachrach said. “‘Who had them? When did they come out? What audiences did they go after?’ And [we] made a strategic line on each one of them.”

    FULL ARTICLE HERE


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #26308
    EarlEarl
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    I’m really jonesing for the one they just released that plays Atari’s 1983 Star Wars arcade game, complete with the original controller – that’s one hurdle that MAME has never been able to overcome with emulating that game.

    If they’re really smart, they might follow it up next year with a machine that can play Tron and Discs of Tron.


    #26319
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    My personal solution to the problem was to purchase a mini-cab at MGC in Milwaukee back in 2014. That had a 60-in-1 Jamma board and the cost was $750? Something like that.

    Nevertheless, when the Arcade1Up systems started popping up in various Walmarts across town, I was intrigued and interested in getting one. I didn’t get one because of that voice in my head (or Angel on my shoulder) that told me I already had all the games these new machines offered.

    There are a couple cabs, however, that have games my mini-cab does not. The one with Asteroids, for example. I think what I will do is compare the games in my mini cab with what Arcade1up has, figure out which cab is the best fit and, come this holiday season, buy one of the cabs. I have room (barely) in my dining area for it so that will work for me.

    Star Wars and the cab featuring Defender and Joust are the leading candidates. The Star Wars one appears to be $200 more expensive (according to Amazon) so I might not get that. We’ll see.

    I’m torn

    #26327
    ZLothZLoth
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    I still have yet to unpack the DVD boxes from my move.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

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