Here’s what made conditions ripe for destructive storms in Dallas-Fort Worth

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  • #25948
    ZLoth
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    From Dallas Morning News:

    Here’s what made conditions ripe for destructive storms in Dallas-Fort Worth

    Dallas-Fort Worth faced its own sort of perfect storm Sunday.

    “We had everything in place — a very unstable atmosphere, heat, humidity — then, of course, we had the cold front, which cooled us down quickly,” said Patricia Sanchez, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

    The volatility of that mixture shocked the area with a downburst that forced damaging winds to or near the ground.

    During a downburst, the winds have nowhere to go but down, Sanchez said. The result was severe wind gusts across North Texas, from 58 mph in Addison to 71 mph at Dallas Love Field.

    Some of the gusts were equivalent to those produced by a weak tornado. Downbursts occur more frequently than tornadoes, with about one tornado for every 10 downburst reports, according to the weather service.

    FULL ARTICLE HERE

    Here’s why Dallas’ outdoor warning sirens didn’t go off during the Sunday storm

    As North Texas braved perilous storms Sunday afternoon, cities received a severe-storm warning from the National Weather Service.

    But Dallas officials, based on a technicality, decided not to sound the city’s outdoor warning sirens, meant to alert those who are outside to seek shelter.

    In fact, Rocky Vaz, director of Dallas’ Office of Emergency Management, said he didn’t know of any North Texas city that used its sirens — although some on social media reported hearing them in Rowlett. And while one woman drowned after her boat flipped on Eagle Mountain Lake northwest of Fort Worth, no injuries have been reported for people who were outdoors during the storm.

    Still, the thunderstorm, which brought 70 mph winds and flash floods, have prompted some to wonder why the sirens didn’t go off. Vaz said the weather service’s warning didn’t meet the criteria for setting off the sirens.

    FULL ARTICLE HERE


    “You can not operate in this room unless you believe that you are Superman, and whatever happens, you’re capable of solving the problem.” – Gene Kranz

    #25950
    Earl
    Earl
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    Hey, that sounds an awful lot like a humid night in April 1996, when the sirens didn’t go off in Fort Smith because hey, it was only a severe thunderstorm warning.

    Until it wasn’t. But by then the tornado had damaged the communication lines between the sirens and anyone hoping to activate them.

    #25952
    ZLoth
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    It was a bit unusual (at least for me). Sunday morning, it was nice and clear. Sunday afternoon, I received a weather warning from my weather radio, but looked at the radar, and saw it was at the Oklahoma border. I left at 12:30 PM and managed to get my hair cut and pick up some stuff for my mother. At 1:35 PM, I saw that the clouds to the north were extremely dark and some of the rain dropping was a bit thick, thus I high-tailed it home. When I was pulling up to my home at 1:34 PM, it was extremely dark and one minute after I closed the garage door, it was coming down and blowing. One hour later, it was all said and done, and I took my neighbor to pick up his car, and it was a clear evening.

    Most of the damage was to the south of me, including a crane collapse in downtown Dallas that has resulted in the landlord there electing to tear down those building. As for Oncor (the electric distributor), they have stated the following:

    As of the morning of Wednesday, June 12th, we have restored power to more than 300,000 customers in the DFW area. Presently, we have less than 30,000 outages remaining.

    We will continue to work in around the clock until power is restored to all of our customers. Along with our crews, we have utility partners from around Texas and 11 different states engaged in our restoration efforts.

    We continue to target the end of the day Wednesday for the vast majority of power restorations. Some customers in hard-hit areas may see restoration times on Thursday.

    Estimated Restoration Times can vary widely following major storms like this and may not reflect actual work required to restore power.

    Many of the remaining outages we are currently working are the most complex. They require the reconstruction of distribution equipment, which often includes replacing utility poles and transformers before new power lines can be installed, and often this only restores power to a handful of homes and businesses at a time.

    Thank you for your continued understanding and patience.

    Looking at the outage map as of this writing….

    Oncor-Outage-Map-Google-Chrome-2019-06-12-12-15-36

    Yet, I didn’t lose power in Richardson.


    “You can not operate in this room unless you believe that you are Superman, and whatever happens, you’re capable of solving the problem.” – Gene Kranz

    #25953
    Earl
    Earl
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    Sunday morning, it was nice and clear.

    Well…

    If you recall, I had spent the afternoon of April 21st, 1996 working camera and instant replay at a college baseball game. It was sunny then too.

    Feel free to double check this with Jeff, but stormy evenings often arise from sunny days – the heat builds up, the humidity builds up, the clouds form, the cap breaks which takes the upper limits off of cumulonimbus formation, all hell breaks loose starting in the early evening hours, and by midnight you’ve spent some quality time in the closet with your cat(s) and family member(s).

    Or at least that was my routine in Arkansas.

    #25954
    ZLoth
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    As I have stated before, I moved to Texas from California expecting differences in multiple areas. And, one of those side effects is the weather. At least you can predict when there is a possibility of a tornado or hail… the prerequisite is thunderstorms in the area. There are usually no warning signs for a earthquake.


    “You can not operate in this room unless you believe that you are Superman, and whatever happens, you’re capable of solving the problem.” – Gene Kranz

    #25955
    Steve W
    Steve W
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    You won’t have to worry too much about earthquakes, most of this area is limestone and acts as a natural shock absorber. An earthquake happened with the epicenter about five or six miles away a few years ago, around a 4 on the Richter scale, and I didn’t even know it had happened.

    I wasn’t even aware we had bad storms. I tend to sleep late due to (a) being a night owl and (b) a wildly varying schedule, and when I went out with my sister (visiting from Louisiana) I was confused that a lot of restaurants and stores had no internet access or credit/debit card connection. I only found out about the storm the next day. When I went out, the weather was nice and peaceful.

    #25956
    ZLoth
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    Just to clarify…. minor earthquakes occur all over the United States all the time, but are so low in magnitude as to be imperceptible unless you have a major instrument. Major earthquakes tend to be limited to certain areas, such as the West Coast (which is why you have the beautiful coastline) and Japan (where it’s right smack at the intersection of three major faults).

    The California central valley does not lend itself to thunderstorms and tornadoes. It doesn’t mean that they don’t occur, just that they occur so rarely that a EF0 merits major local news coverage.


    “You can not operate in this room unless you believe that you are Superman, and whatever happens, you’re capable of solving the problem.” – Gene Kranz

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