Freddie Prinze Jr.'s Star Wars fandom rant…is he right?

Hailing frequencies open… Forums Science Fiction Star Wars Freddie Prinze Jr.'s Star Wars fandom rant…is he right?

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  • #26259
    EarlEarl
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    Freddie Prinze Jr. played rogue Jedi Kanan Jarrus on Star Wars: Rebels, and he’s apparently gotten his share of hate mail for voicing an animated Star Wars character. And he has things to say. [LINK]

    Prinze Jr. begins by telling Dye how “even I get hate from Star Wars fans,” stating that these upset fans failed to realize that they were not the target demographic for the series.

    “I did a Star Wars cartoon, so even I get hate from Star Wars fans when I’m like ‘Look dog, you’re just mad the franchise isn’t aging with you.’ But that ain’t how it works. The first one was for f—-ing kids. The second three, were for different f—ing kids, and this one is for kids. You’re just pissed off that Han Solo gave the f—ing Millenium Falcon to a girl. That’s it.”

    And while some of what he says afterward gets even more ranty and profanity-laden, I think he’s hit upon what I actually like about the stuff that I like. And why I have so much trouble with fandom raging against new iterations of existing properties when I seem to be enjoying them just fine.

    I avoid spoilers and ridiculous amounts of overanalysis because, deep down, I want this stuff to help me escape, tell me a story, and let me be thrilled like a kid again. I don’t want Star Wars to age with me. I want Star Wars to de-age me, just for a little bit. Maybe this makes me some kind of unsophisticated media consumer or something, but…I think what people take in is what they’re going to end up taking out. If you go in expecting something to suck, and you’re primed and ready to complain about how much it sucks…guess what, it’s going to suck. That’s the filter you’re viewing it through from the outset.

    Would I have said it with the same number of F-bombs as Prinze did? Probably not. But I think he’s landed on something valid there.


    #26260
    ZLothZLoth
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    Sign…. the “fan” part of “fanatic” bites again and claim another victim. The problem is that the actor has limited input in their roles. They are given the lines to read, and receive the paycheck.

    At least I can say is that his life went much better than his father, Freddie Prinze who starred in the short-lived series Chico and the Man before taking his own life. He also married Sarah Michelle Geller, and from all appearances, they are very happily married. Both has pretty good post-Hollywood careers.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #26261
    Steve WSteve W
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    It’s also not the fan’s fault entirely. It’s that so many people at LucasFilm actively attack the Star Wars fan base on social media for not liking their poorly written movies. And I hate that people keep saying that Star Wars was a kid’s film – George Lucas fought against pretty much everybody while making the original movie because the crew thought it was a kiddie movie and wouldn’t put out all that much effort. All the strain he was under getting all these people to take the film seriously is one of the reasons he had to be hospitalized in that time. He was trying to make a movie that captured the spirit of the serials he grew up on, but appealed to everyone. Hearing idiots nowadays say “it’s a kid’s film” makes that person come across as an unobservant, condescending asshat.

    There wouldn’t be a backlash against LucasFilm if they wouldn’t keep railing against the fanbase rather than thinking “hey, maybe we aren’t doing very good jobs at creating movies since everybody online is telling us they aren’t good”. And Han Solo didn’t give the Millenium Falcon to a girl as he puts it, she was in the ship once or twice and she just gets it handed to her for no reason other than she’s a Mary Sue. The all-female Story Group at LucasFilm are attractive, young women and they wrote a character with their own sense of entitlement, the character’s young and pretty so people just give her everything and everybody should like her. The character hasn’t earned a thing or learned any lesson. How much did Luke get the crap kicked out of him and lost so much by the beginning of the third film? Did any of that happen to Rey? Again, it’s bad writing that upsets the fans, not that the protagonist is female. Look at Mad Max: Fury Road. Nobody gave a damn that the main protagonist was a woman, because she was written realistically and that made the viewers love the character. That’s good writing – the Disney Star Wars films are examples of terrible writing. Up until now I’ve watched every Star Wars movie in the theater… after the atrocious Last Jedi (which almost beats out the Doctor Who episode “Kill the Moon” for terribleness) I will not go see another one. They keep insulting me and my intelligence, and I won’t give them my money. And I’m not even a Star Wars fan.

    #26262
    EarlEarl
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    The all-female Story Group at LucasFilm are attractive, young women and they wrote a character with their own sense of entitlement, the character’s young and pretty so people just give her everything and everybody should like her.

    I wasn’t aware that Pablo Hidalgo had undergone gender reassignment surgery…oh, wait, he hasn’t. According to Wookieepedia [LINK], the following people make up the Lucasfilm Story Group:

    • Rayne Roberts
    • Carrie Beck
    • Diana Williams
    • Leland Chee
    • Pablo Hidalgo
    • Matt Martin
    • Steve Blank
    • James Waugh
    • Josh Rimes
    • Stephen Feder
    • Cara Pardo

    …and these people haven’t been writing the movies. The Story Group more or less serves the same function for the Star Wars (and, if the property is ever revived, Indiana Jones) universes as Mike & Denise Okuda and Larry Nemecek did for Berman-era Star Trek: they mind the P’s and Q’s of established continuity, offer solutions and recommendations to writers who might want to bend it a bit, and, also according to the above page:

    …the story group tends to encourage content creators to create new elements instead of using pre-existing ones.

    So…not sure where you were getting your information, but that list of 11 names looks to me like it contains at least 7 men, and in any case, they’re the canon-keepers, not the script-writers. I doubt they can override Dave Filoni or Larry Kasdan, for example. The Story Group’s function really seems to primarily be keeping the novels and comics in line with the movies and TV series.

    Oh, by the way, back to Mr. Prinze – Zloth, were you aware that Sarah Michelle Gellar had a recurring voice role in one season of Rebels? [LINK] (As one of the bad guys no less!) So for a while there, using the Force was the family business. 😆


    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by EarlEarl.
    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by EarlEarl.
    #26266
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    And I hate that people keep saying that Star Wars was a kid’s film – George Lucas fought against pretty much everybody while making the original movie because the crew thought it was a kiddie movie and wouldn’t put out all that much effort.

    If Lucas truly believed his Star Wars movies were not kiddie movies, he’s guilty of sending out mixed signals about it. Back in 1976, before the movie was released, George was peddling licenses for Star Wars action figures, which eventually got picked up by Kenner. One generally doesn’t market action figures to adults, at least not in the 70’s. Lucas was obviously aware that there was a kiddie appeal to the movie before production completed. Getting upset that others didn’t treat the film as adult seems disingenuous to me.

    Don’t forget that George originally was going to make Endor a Wookie planet but decided to cut the Wookies in half and call them Ewoks just so he could make the move more appealing to kids and – surprise! – sell more kiddie toys. If George truly thought the Star Wars franchise was not kiddie material, he abandoned that notion by the time “Return of the Jedi” came out.

    No doubt Star Wars – and Empire Strikes Back – had very adult themes in it. That was a big factor of what made Star Wars appealing to me when I first saw it at 17 years of age. More so when I watched an even more adult Empire Strikes Back movie when I was 20 years old. Those themes, however, got frequently subjugated not only by scenes clearly designed to appeal to the kiddies but also by Kenner and other companies advertising Star Wars toys on TV.

    I’m sorry to hear that George was hospitalized by the strain of his employees misconceptions of his work but he set himself up for it by trying to eat his cake and have it too.

    #26268
    ZLothZLoth
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    Oh, by the way, back to Mr. Prinze – Zloth, were you aware that Sarah Michelle Gellar had a recurring voice role in one season of Rebels? [LINK] (As one of the bad guys no less!) So for a while there, using the Force was the family business. 😆

    See what happens when you spend six years of your life in the dark.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

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