End of Owning Music: How CDs, Downloads Died

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  • #26521
    ZLothZLoth
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    From Rolling Stone:

    The End of Owning Music: How CDs and Downloads Died
    Physical formats are cratering, but vinyl’s niche is growing. Jack White and other experts explain the future of listening.

    If you visited Austin’s Waterloo Records recently, you might have noticed a construction project that was unthinkable not so long ago: The 36-year-old Austin music staple was replacing 24 feet of CD racks with space for more vinyl. “After 30 years of CDs, a lot of people are moving on from that format,” says Waterloo owner John Kunz. “Whether they’re going back to vinyl, or streaming, people are selling off those CDs.”

    FULL ARTICLE HERE

    I can understand the migration from CD to downloadable format, but…. vinyl?


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #26522
    ubikuberallesubikuberalles
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    We’ll see how long this vinyl thing goes. It’s got legs so I think it will last a while. Streaming will be with us forever, I think, unless there is a network failure apocalypse down the road.

    For me it’s all about the MP3s. Sure, I have a large CD and vinyl collection (and a modest cassette collection) but most of my music is in MP3 format. The majority are MP3’s ripped from the CDs (some from the vinyl and cassettes).

    A while ago Amazon offered to allow us to upload our MP3s into their Music cloud storage and I did just that. About 400 CDs worth. It was great. Before, I could only hear my MP3s via computers that were connected to my file server at home. After the great upload I could hear it at work or even on my phone (as long as it was on WiFi because it ate up my phone bandwidth very quickly).

    And then a couple years ago Amazon announced that they will no longer allow uploads of MP3 files. But hey! We can still play the mp3s we uploaded in the past, that’s not going away. Also, Amazon has lots of free music tracks for Amazon Prime subscribers. Well, it wasn’t long before those free tracks dried up and I would have to purchase those tracks if I want to hear them on the Amazon music player. Also, you can tell which tracks were uploaded because they were much lighter shade than the purchased tracks. At first I thought they were grayed out and unusable but they worked just fine. Just a hint from Amazon that those uploaded tracks are unwanted. If they expect me to re-purchase those tracks (which would cost me a fortune), they have another thing coming.

    One of the early promises (I thought) of streaming is that I could play whatever I want wherever and whenever I want. With NetFlix increasingly dropping and adding titles almost seemingly on whim, that promise (or maybe hope on my part) quickly evaporated. I’m not sure if the same is true with music streaming but it would not surprise me.

    Watching or listening to something whenever I want is a big deal to me and it urks me when I am ready to watch a show to find it was yanked by NetFlix. I refuse to abide by a streamers schedule so, when I hear a series or movie is to leave NetFlix, I purposely refuse to watch it before it is gone (exception: Friends. Even then I got tired of the show – hate Ross – and stopped watching mid-way through season three before the exit deadline).

    In the meantime, I’ll hang on to my DVDs, CDs, MPs and other physical media so I can play what I want whenever I want. Childish? Perhaps, but there is a certain satisfaction of being able to play a song whenever I want.

    #26523
    ZLothZLoth
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    And this is why I prefer to have my own Plex media server. And because I’m paying a good chunk of change for high upload speeds (35mb up in Richardson verses 20mb down in Citrus Heights, not to mention either 1 or 3 mb up), it’s allowing me to play back music or video while I’m at work.


    “All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can’t get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer.” —IBM Manual, 1925

    #26525
    EarlEarl
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    I don’t eat out a whole lot, but with the recent push to support small businesses, the irony is that I just recently bought a few digital albums and preordered two CDs. Some soundtracks, some not. (I do occasionally buy vinyl, but usually for display – last November, before everything went nuts on my end, I ordered both the CD and the vinyl of the new ELO album. The LP joined the rest of ELO’s LPs on the “ELO wall”…all of which is, sadly, currently still in storage.)

    If I stream music…it’s usually from my Plex server, which is where everything immediately gets ripped into. So…still very much invested in the “owning music” world. Because sooner or later, the network’ll be down, at least for a little bit.


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