America hasn’t seen a solar eclipse like this since WW1

Hailing frequencies open… Forums Science Fiction Sci Minus Fi America hasn’t seen a solar eclipse like this since WW1

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  • #2109
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    From Ars Technica:

    America hasn’t seen a solar eclipse like this since the end of World War I

    Soon, the United States will have a chance to see an eclipse of our own (and assign cultural value as we please). Mark your calendars: the next total solar eclipse comes to the USA one year from today, on August 21, 2017.

    Modern Americans probably don’t know exactly what to make of a total solar eclipse—because most of them have never seen one. The last total solar eclipse in the contiguous United States, 37 years ago, only clipped the northwestern United States, mostly rural areas of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and North Dakota. According to Eclipse2017.org, the day of Feb. 28, 1979, was cold and dreary in the Northwest, and most people in the path of totality did not see the eclipse due to clouds and rain. The last eclipse to traverse much of the United States came all the way back in 1918, on June 8.

    FULL ARTICLE HERE

    #9529

    If everyone can just please stop tweeting this and handing links around, I bet the folks around here won’t hear about it, and I can take over as the village shaman when this happens by summoning and then fending off the giant space goat that wants to eat our sun!

    PH33R M3

    #9530
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    So what will this eclipse foretell when it happens? Well, if Trump is president it will foretell the END OF THE WORLD!

    If Clinton is president it will foretell the END OF THE WORLD! It will just happen in a different manner (Trump: Nuclear war since we all know how unstable he is. Clinton: By bringing in “Third World” Immigrants which will destroy America followed by the end of the world.)

    A couple years ago we had an annular eclipse and I did not prepare for it at all. What I should have done is build a quick pinhole camera obscura (cardboard box, a small square from an aluminum can with a pinhole in it) but instead I tried taking a picture directly with my camera at its fastest shutter speed (1/8000 second, I believe). It didn’t work: one big white blur. 🙁 So I think I will do that next year since I can easily get those materials (worst case, buy a six pack and ask the local grocery store for a unused box).

    Here’s a picture of the track:

    Hmmm. No where near my location but I’m sure if I stayed in ABQ I’d see some kind of partial eclipse. I’d rather see a total eclipse so maybe I should consider a trip to Nashville or Carbondale?

    #9531
    ZLoth
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    This would be a good road trip…. if it wasn’t on the same week as the TM International Conference in Vancouver, BC. Thinking, thinking, thinking…. I could fly out to Portland the day before, stay overnight, rent a car, get into one of the zones, watch the eclipse, then fly out that night to Vancouver.

    Or Boise. THere is always Boise.

    #9532
    ubikuberalles
    ubikuberalles
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    It appears (from the picture) that the further East you go, the better the totality. Which is why I would favor Nashville over Kansas City, even though it is further away. Also, I’ve never been to Nashville. 😉

    #9533
    Steve W
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    I’d like to see a full eclipse, but that’s a long way to go for it. I think I need another reason or two to drive all that way. On the plus side, my oldest sister has taken a private chef job in northern Arkansas about an hour northwest of Memphis, so I could at least drop by and see her.

    I think I need more information to go on before planning a trip. A larger map with the area containing the best central eclipse viewing would help. It’d suck to drive up near Columbia, MS and end up being outside the prime viewing region.

    I’ve witnessed a couple partial eclipses when I was young, it’s about time I see a full one. But I wonder if it’ll be worth the effort.

    #9534
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    Try this Google Map from Eclipse 2017.

    #9535
    Steve W
    Steve W
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    Thanks for that link! I might just wait until 2024, that eclipse seems to be going right over my patch of ground. No two day long drive involved.

    #9536
    ZLoth
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    Phase I Complete! I have a hotel room booked just north of the path, and at a decent rate too! That means all I have to do is travel to Boise the day before, rent a car, see the eclipse, return to airport, flyu to Vancouver, BC.

    #9537
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    OK, plan A scrapped since I’m no longer a Toastmaster. Instead, I’m turning this into a road trip to Idaho.

    #20927
    ZLoth
    ZLoth
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    From Astronomy Magazine:

    20 hot spots to view the solar eclipse

    The total solar eclipse that will happen August 21, 2017, will dazzle everyone who views it. Potential observers may have some questions, however. Where in the United States does totality happen? That’s easy to answer with a detailed map. Where are the best spots to view the event? That isn’t as straightforward.

    Except for knowing that you want to be on, or at least near, the eclipse’s center line — where totality will last the longest — what makes for a good viewing location? Here are 20 sites you should consider, starting in the Northwest and working to the Southeast.

    FULL ARTICLE HERE

    I’m headed to spot #3. And, here is the first weather forecast.

    #20928
    Steve W
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    Well, if I did decide to use up another week of vacation time to see the eclipse, I would have gone the day before to my sister’s place in Newport, Arkansas to stay the night, and the next day drive up to a little park area just south of Elkhurst, Missouri. Nicely out of the way so I wouldn’t have to deal with a million yahoos, directly in the maximum path of totality, and still a short distance from either Kansas City or St. Louis for a good meal and to burn off the rest of the day.

    I’m instead going to be working that day. At least the eclipse will happen right before I go in to work, and we’ll be getting 75% here.

    #20978
    Earl
    Earl
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    I’ve got my eclipse glasses ready…

    Eclipse glasses Eclipse glasses

    …these were part of a package that you could get from the Planetary Society, and the glasses are really nice. They’re made by Celestron, a company that actually makes telescopes and sun filters, and have actual optics rather than just film – they have 2x magnification. The only disappointing part of the package: it comes with a T-shirt, which I asked them to send in E’s size…and instead they sent it in the size they have on file for me (2X).

    Eek! Lips!

    See you on the dark side of the moon.

    #20984
    Earl
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    My best photos of the eclipse from Van Buren, AR. We reached approximately 88% totality here.

    12:22:29pm CDT – Mr. Blue, you did it right…

    12:52:52pm CDT- …but soon comes Mr. Night…

    1:02:48pm CDT – …creepin’ over, now his hand is on your shoulder…

    1:11:45pm CDT – …never mind, I’ll remember you this…

    1:13:10pm CDT – …I’ll remember you this way.

    The last picture was as “covered” as the sun got.

    Photos taken through a welding shield borrowed from the guys in the shop at work. The Celestron solar glasses were awesome – I wish I could’ve photographed through those.

    #20985
    ZLoth
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    It was two minutes of AWESOME! My buddy and I lucked out as Smith’s Ferry was cloudless. There was plates from Oregon, Washington, California, Colorado, Montana, Minnesota, and West Virginia that we saw, and we ran into a couple from England who missed the eclipse in France because of cloud cover, and vowed to make this one. Nothing can quite describe the final minute of darkness followed by two minutes of the ring of fire.

    You can bet I will be there for the 2024 eclipse.

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